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Discussion Starter #1
YA! I took he to the vet this morning and had her staples taken out, the vet gave her the all clear, she is ready to resume normal activity!!!! Her leg is healing great and should be able to finish healing without further follow up! Now, to get that clip fixed LOL!!!! My friend Amber is going to put her in pattern for me when she gets back from Nationals for her Borzoi.
 

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Sorry I have been away for a bit - what happened to Zoey's leg? I am glad she is on the mend for you, it is so hard keeping a lively poo quiet when they have medical issues :smile:
 

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Thanks for the update on Zoey. So glad that her staples are out and that she is doing so well, but probably not as glad as you are though, and definately not as thrilled as Zoey probably is. Good for you Zoey.........
 

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GREAT!! Good for Zoey and you! Look forward to seeing new groomed pics of her later on. :)

Thank you and I will get them posted as soon as I get it done! It may be a couple weeks though, she is still a little unstable so I don't want to push her.


Sorry I have been away for a bit - what happened to Zoey's leg? I am glad she is on the mend for you, it is so hard keeping a lively poo quiet when they have medical issues :smile:
Zoey has LCP, she had to have FHO Surgery, she is happy and on her way back to her old self!

yay for Zoey!!!
Thanks for the update on Zoey. So glad that her staples are out and that she is doing so well, but probably not as glad as you are though, and definately not as thrilled as Zoey probably is. Good for you Zoey.........

Thank You everyone!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I too must have missed this.
What is LCP and FHO?
In any case,it's good news that she is recovering.
Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCP) is a disorder of hip joint conformation occurring in both humans and dogs. In dogs, it is most often seen in the miniature and toy breeds between the ages of 4 months to a year.

LCP results when the blood supply to the femoral head is interrupted resulting in avascular necrosis, or the death of the bone cells. Followed by a period of revascularization, the femoral head is subject to remodeling and/or collapse creating an irregular fit in the acetabulum, or socket. This process of bone cells dying and fracturing followed by new bone growth and remodeling of the femoral head and neck, can lead to stiffness and pain.

LCP is believed to be an inherited disease, although the mode of inheritance is not known. Because there is a genetic component, it is recommended that dogs affected with LCP not be used in breeding programs.

The degree of clinical severity of LCP varies, and treatment can vary accordingly.

In mild cases, the dog may occasionally resist bearing weight on the affected leg or may exhibit periodic lameness. In these cases, limited activity and treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be sufficient.

In more severe cases as the pain and discomfort experienced increase, the dog may become totally lame and avoid all use of the affected leg. Furthermore, the leg muscles may begin to atrophy after extended periods of non-use. In severe cases, treatment often resorts to excision of the femoral head and neck. By removing the femoral head and neck, the bone on bone contact that is the source of the pain and discomfort is eliminated. Later, through the healing process and with therapy, a new false joint is formed by muscle and tissue, and the dog may have a complete recovery.

I hope this helps explain it, Zoey had a severe case so she had to have the FHO surgery that is explained here, she had gained one point towards her championship before she started exhibiting signs, so she was spayed while in surgery as well.
 

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I'm so glad things have gone well with the surgery and the recovery passion. I imagine that required quite some weeks of keeping her quiet :smile:
 

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I'm so glad things have gone well with the surgery and the recovery passion. I imagine that required quite some weeks of keeping her quiet :smile:
Actually, since she is a toy, no...it has been 2 weeks today lol! Toys tend to recover from this type of surgery alot faster then standards, but the week and a half that I did have to was hard, because she was trying to run after birds and stuff like a week after the surgery! lol. Thank you for the thoughts.
 

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LCP Research Study

I'm so glad to hear Zoey had a successful surgery! How is her recovery going?

I'm involved in canine health research, and we'd love to have her in our genetic research study - all it takes is a quick trip to the vet for a blood draw, filling out the forms and then shipping it to Clemson University. My website with more information is:
Association Mapping Study of Legg-Calve Perthes & Patella Luxation in Poodles

This research is being funded by the Poodle Club of America Foundation and is entirely nonprofit and public. We are not offering any type of treatment; our hope is to eventually offer a genetic test, allowing breeders to stop passing these diseases onto the next generation of dogs. You can contact me thorugh poodle forum, and there is also a contact form on the web page listed above. Please consider participating, and best wishes to you and Zoey.
 
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