Poodle Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,546 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What does your poodle do if someone knocks on your door or rings the bell?

Right now Peggy races to the door, barking ferociously, and then immediately stops when I get to the door. She will step back, give me plenty of room to step out onto the porch, and watch from the window, without making another peep, for as long as I'm out there.

I'm trying to decide if this is acceptable.

It's nice from a security standpoint, but slightly terrifying for innocent visitors (like our poor landscaper today). It's the only time she barks like that.

Would love to hear about your poodle's "door routine."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Diva jumps up gives a few barks. I tell her quiet she sits back down and gives the odd yip. I’ve never told her off for it, just give the quiet command. I like she tells me someone’s there, especially in our noisy house I don’t always hear 😆 So she helps me out. I don’t allow her to run up to the door she will stay where she is (Often on the sofa) just giving out the out low yip 😆
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,032 Posts
I do wonder... Misha's never experienced a knock at the door because we have an outside gate that has to be opened first. He doesn't react at all to my boyfriend getting home and coming in the door. It sounds like Peggy thinks she's doing her job and alerting you and then supervises while you deal with the intruder.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,546 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I do wonder... Misha's never experienced a knock at the door because we have an outside gate that has to be opened first. He doesn't react at all to my boyfriend getting home and coming in the door. It sounds like Peggy thinks she's doing her job and alerting you and then supervises while you deal with the intruder.
Oh that gate sounds nice! And I do agree that Peggy seems to see this as her job. I know I could teach her a different behaviour if I put my mind to it, I'm just not sure I want to.

When I lived in a condo building, the lobby buzzer would ring my iPhone, so I assigned a specific ringtone to it. Gracie got so used to that ringtone meaning "delivery is here!!! yummy food!!!" that half a decade after we moved out of that place and 2,500 miles away, it could still make her dance and yelp.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,546 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Diva jumps up gives a few barks. I tell her quiet she sits back down and gives the odd yip. I’ve never told her off for it, just give the quiet command. I like she tells me someone’s there, especially in our noisy house I don’t always hear 😆 So she helps me out. I don’t allow her to run up to the door she will stay where she is (Often on the sofa) just giving out the out low yip 😆
I think I like that. The rushing to the window is a little intense.

And that low yip sounds so cute!

Peggy sometimes does a funny woof with her mouth closed, after she's been shushed or when she knows she's about to be shushed.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Pogo is quite ferocious to new visitors. He barks and throws himself at the door. If the person is a relative who blows off my request to wait and sidles through the screen door, he will lunge at them. He will settle if I make everyone, dog and human both, take the time for a proper introduction. I make Pogo step away from the door and sit. I invite the visitor in. I let Pogo get up and inspect them for contraband. After that is done then we can all proceed to the living room or den, and he will either go to sleep or present them with a snobbery tennis ball.
I've thought about whether his territorial behavior is really a problem. He's totally fine on walks. He's fine when a friend he knows well comes over. He's fine after introductions have been made. The only time he's ever really done something dubious is when people have entered my house without getting cleared by me. I don't actually want people entering my house without my permission, so I haven't made much effort to train him out of his guard dog attitude.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,500 Posts
Beckie barks but she stops as soon as the person enters. Merlin doesn’t. To me it’s fine, they wouldn’t scare anyone anyways... :)

She will then come and smell the person, often wagging her tail, but she won’t let anyone pet her. She will snell their hands and lick, but back away if they try to reach her. Merlin stays behind her most of the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,207 Posts
My two yap vigorously for all doorstep arrivals, and bounce at the door if it is someone they know and like. When asked they move back and wait for me to open the door, then greet whoever is there reasonably politely. I don't have a bell or door knocker, so would often miss the sound of someone at the door without their help, although I do sometimes wish I had taught a slightly quieter way of warning!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,423 Posts
Renn will bark ferociously too, if some knocks at the door. We get deliveries of medical supplies monthly and the guy puts them into my husbands room. I have Renn gated off, he will bark at him but when I say its ok he will stop, when the guy comes thru with the 2nd load he will give a few barks calmer one, the by the third trip he just lies down and goes to sleep. LOL So its only the initial response, and I like that it lets people know Oh there is a big dog in that house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
I think it’s really just a personal preference thing. I also like the barking as a way to deter anyone who shouldn’t be on our property... As long as they don’t bolt out the door and calmly inspect whoever I’ve allowed in, I’m totally fine with them sounding ferocious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
My dogs freak the heck out and the Boston Terrier runs to the window and barks so high pitched it sounds like shrieks. However, we do live in an isolated place and people don’t knock on the door much, like....I can’t remember the last time. If we’re expecting someone we usually go greet them on the porch, or my family just walk in. The good thing is, the dogs love people. The other good thing is, no one could sneak up on us


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
Normie's at the age where it frightens him when someone comes to the door. Even my husband appearing suddenly in the room can elicit a startled bark.

I want to stop the door barking, but if I try to reassure him I'm rewarding undesired behavior. How do I extinguish it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,864 Posts
Ours are terrible: jumping, barking, growling but I know none of it terribly serious. Most people who are familiar aren't phased but if a new and naive of their antics delivery person comes it is potentially scary since very loud. They knock it off when the person and I start talking. This is part of why we have a lockable high quality storm door with the top half being able to roll up for all glass or lowered to get partial or full on the top screen. We never open it for full screen but leave some glass showing so they can't rip the screen by jumping.

To get rid of that door alert barking and jumping if you find it unacceptable then you should train a really good go to your place with maybe just a rug mat about 5' from the door and make sure your dog knows that it is very valuable to stay on it until you release them. This is easiest to do with a household member or good friend who won't mind standing outside and ringing the bell over an over. I think Susan Garrett has that training on a video somewhere.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dianaleez

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,546 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I want to stop the door barking, but if I try to reassure him I'm rewarding undesired behavior. How do I extinguish it?
You can use treats and reassurance to change Normie's mindset when the doorbell rings. With consistency, you can teach him that someone at the door = happy, yummy things.

But.....the consistency part is hard. And you want to catch him before he starts freaking out, so that he hears the door and automatically looks to you (or goes to a special place, mat, etc.).

I had some luck ringing the bell and then sticking a treat under Peggy's nose. She quickly caught on and would quietly wait for the treat.

But when someone else rang the bell unexpectedly, she was back to freaking out. I'm not sure if this is because I didn't practise enough to make it a habit (probably) or if it's just impossible to replicate the excitement of someone else at the door without recruiting some help. Tough to do during quarantine, unfortunately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Sometimes with my dogs I feel like a doorbell is not needed as they run up to the front window and bark as if saying "mom, look it's a dangerous squirrel"! We also have a ring doorbell and they have learned the sound it makes on our phones means something is outside, even if we are on the boat they bark at the noise. 😂 We are trying to teach them to sit on the title floor a few feet from our front door so they are not at our feet as we open the door, making slow progress as well due to quarantine. If you want to try an unexpected bell you could use a Bluetooth speaker and try playing the noise of your doorbell while you do normal day activity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,331 Posts
With four dogs, it’s pretty much mayhem here when the doorbell rings! I have failed miserably at training any other responses, mainly because I haven’t tried, lol. I found if I Scatter kibble when someone comes in the door, they go to that and then are calmer to greet the person. Sometimes I just put them in the yard and then answer the door, letting them in in a few minutes. They’re not aggressive, just overly friendly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PeggyTheParti

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,546 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
With four dogs, it’s pretty much mayhem here when the doorbell rings! I have failed miserably at training any other responses, mainly because I haven’t tried, lol. I found if I Scatter kibble when someone comes in the door, they go to that and then are calmer to greet the person. Sometimes I just put them in the yard and then answer the door, letting them in in a few minutes. They’re not aggressive, just overly friendly.
Four dogs! I'd need six more hands, at least.

What happens when people actually come inside is a whooooole other story with Peggy. She's had so little interaction with folks inside our home. We don't have family nearby, or even the sort of friends here who'd come over for a visit, so we've failed horribly at desensitizing her to guests. When we interviewed petsitters, she pretty much sat on top of them the whole time.

I'm going to try the physical separation idea. Sounds much less stressful than managing her at the door. Maybe even letting her greet visitors in the backyard instead of at the door would be helpful. Let her work up to having new people in her living space.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top