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I'm fairly new to poodles, but I've learned a few things from the forum about researching poodles and what to look for on websites...

Here are some concerns I have about their site. They mention (once that I could find) that their dogs are health tested, but they really don't convince me of that. I couldn't find ANY full body shots of any of their breeding dogs (just really, really close head shots) so you can't see anything about conformation at all! They mention "champion bloodlines", but I've learned that's not worth the breath it takes to say it - Either they're currently showing their dogs and earning titles on them, or their breeding dogs aren't being shown or titled - but they shouldn't ride on the coat-tails of other people who may have shown and titled dogs further back in the pedigree.

I don't see anything from the website that would make me want to pursue them - but if you have the time and inclination, you could initiate personal contact with them and try to get a better feel for how they run their program (than you can from their -IMO- sorta sketchy website...)

Hope you are able to find what you are looking for!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks so much. When I saw their "breeding philosophy" link, I thought it sounded pretty good, but I'm not sophisticated enough to read between the lines. E.g., it says:



A female in our breeding program is never bred more often than every other heat. She is over two years of age before she is considered for our breeding program. A female Standard Poodle under two years of age is not mentally or physically mature enough to be bred. We do not breed a female who is over 7 years of age. A female over 7 years old may have age-related complications during whelping. Our Poodles never have more than three litters in their lifetime.


Prior to Breeding:

Vaccinations: A female Poodle that is going to be bred is brought up to date on all vaccinations in order that she can pass along maximum protection (immunity) from disease to her puppies. The stud dog must also be up to date on his vaccinations.



Parasite Control: The female Poodle to be bred is wormed prior to breeding. Throughout the female's lifetime, we use a safe product to eliminate all external parasites. Internal and external parasites will prevent a female from providing maximum nutrition and immunity to her puppies thereby putting the puppies' survival at risk.



Physical Condition:Any Poodle in our breeding program must be in excellent physical condition. Physical condition (well muscled and in proper weight) is necessary in the female Poodle to enable her to whelp naturally and easily. Prior to breeding the female is tested for brucellosis (a highly contagious venereal disease). Females carrying the brucellosis bacteria may abort their litters or deliver dead puppies.

But I guess that isn't saying very much, right? Also, my husband was excited by their statement that they breed for Service Dogs: (again, quoting from their website): "We are extra vigilant in selecting the dogs we breed because, as a subsidiary of Service Dogs International, many of our dogs become Service Dogs helping disabled persons live a more independent life. Any poodle we breed must, therefore, be sound in temperament as well as health and structure. "

This, too, doesn't mean much? Our main goal is to find a dog that is healthy, will be healthy for many, many years, and is of a fairly predictable temperament - one that is appropriate and expected of the Standard Poodle. Shouldn't be so difficult - but it's a jungle out there!

Again, thanks for your input - I really appreciate it.
 

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Our main goal is to find a dog that is healthy, will be healthy for many, many years, and is of a fairly predictable temperament - one that is appropriate and expected of the Standard Poodle. Shouldn't be so difficult - but it's a jungle out there!
That doesn't seem to be too much to ask, huh?? :lol: There are people on this forum who can help you research the health testing (if the breeders have actually had the tests done, and if they've posted them on the appropriate sites) There are occasions when breeders will have the tests conducted, but not post the results electronically, then they should be able to provide you with paper copies of all the results (with no procrastination or excuses!) and be willing to help you understand them... Testing of the parents is the first best step in ensuring a healthy pup!

If you don't rush into anything, you should be able to find what you're looking for and suffer no "buyer's remorse". Just take your time, do your research, don't make snap decisions (although if you ever go to see a litter of babies - I know how hard it will be to walk away if you don't get a good feeling about the breeder!!) :)

Once you find a good quality, healthy puppy - nothing else will compare!!

Good luck and let us know how goes your search!
 

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Their site is strangely lacking information. Their link to poodlepedigree.com shows a picture but no pedigree (this could be poodle pedigree's problem). They do not list registered names and the AKC registration #s they give for Denver and Glory are incomplete (only 8 digits).

I could not find any testing information on OFA for Boo who does have a registration # that is 10 digits. They say that Boo was a service dog for an elderly man, but I didn't know that people had intact service dogs. I think they are usually spayed because going into heat once or twice a year would be a problem for a working service dog.

They say that they are a subsidiary of Service Dog International, but I can't find information about this organization (this may be my poor research skills).

They don't show any pictures of their dogs doing anything. The only photos they have of their dogs are head shots.
 

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They say that they are a subsidiary of Service Dog International, but I can't find information about this organization (this may be my poor research skills).
Well I have very good research skills (part of my profession) and I was not able to find any information about it either. There's Assistance Dogs International and Therapy Dogs International, but no Service Dogs International, as far as I can find. Maybe it's a small organization that they started and run themselves, although I'm not sure why that would warrant being called "International".

Can you even be a subsidiary of a not for profit? I think it would make more sense to use the word "affiliated". *shrugs*
 

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I came across a website that referenced them as a new organization based in CT, so added that to my search :).

Now if I could just make a living at searching the internet ;).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You guys are so impressive! And so helpful. Thanks for the guidance. I'll keep you posted on my search.
 
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