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I know spoos are considered Seniors at age 5. Yes, 5 years old. I think most owners of a healthy 5 year old spoo would disagree, but to see early signs of aging in a spoo at age 8 is probably within the norm. How this translates to the other poodle varieties is a mystery to me.
Liz, do you have a source for this? Or is it more from personal observation? As a first time spoo-owner, I’m very interested!

I was able to find this:

“Small dogs are considered senior citizens of the canine community when they reach 11 years of age. Their medium sized friends become seniors at 10 years of age. Their larger sized colleagues are seniors at 8 years of age. And, finally, their giant-breed counterparts are seniors at 7 years old.”

 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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That's shocking! I bred standard poodles for quite a few years and would not have considered one to be a senior until 11-12 years. Mine generally lived to be 15 or 16. This was in the 70s and 80s. My dogs were the usual Wycliffe/BelTor background - Jaylee breeding. I did lose my best dog to complications of juvenile kidneys at age 5.
That loss must have been devastating, Johanna. I think most owners would agree with you that their spoos don't show any sign of slowing down until 11/12, but according to vets, spoos, like other similarly sized dogs, are considered seniors at age 5. I'm not in a position to say whether what I have experienced with Mia is because 1) I have more opportunities to observe her athleticism than many owners, 2) she was extremely active as a young dog leading to early onset arthritis, 3) her genetics and breeding are inferior, or 4) there has been a decline in health and longevity in poodles (or 5--something else). Perhaps @DogtorDoctor can chime in?
Wow! I just noticed Maizie being stiff and sore when she got up from a nap, this was a day after ripping through the park at high speeds. She is 6. That was the first sign of age I noticed in either of the spoos :confused:
Oof, that first hint that she's not a puppy any more can hit hard! I think it says a lot about your observational skills to notice a change like this.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Liz, do you have a source for this? Or is it more from personal observation? As a first time spoo-owner, I’m very interested!

I was able to find this:

“Small dogs are considered senior citizens of the canine community when they reach 11 years of age. Their medium sized friends become seniors at 10 years of age. Their larger sized colleagues are seniors at 8 years of age. And, finally, their giant-breed counterparts are seniors at 7 years old.”

Sorry, Robin I saw your post after I commented. It's what several vets told me around the time Mia turned 5 and I moved interstate. There's always a chance it's a way to justify the additional costs wrapped up in Senior Wellness checkups (certainly my suspicion at the time, while Mia pogoed around the clinic!).
 

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Elroy: Standard Poodle 02/20/21
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That's shocking! I bred standard poodles for quite a few years and would not have considered one to be a senior until 11-12 years. Mine generally lived to be 15 or 16. This was in the 70s and 80s. My dogs were the usual Wycliffe/BelTor background - Jaylee breeding. I did lose my best dog to complications of juvenile kidneys at age 5.

I hope some of the standard poodle breeders on this forum will comment on this.
Seems like 12 is an average life span for Standard Poodles when I search it. I've got no experience to add useful data otherwise.
 

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Like nothing ever happened !

He had his pain med this morning again. He doesn’t look drowsy at all. So I guess we’ll know in 5 days when I stop giving it the pain returns or not.
I'm glad to hear he's doing so well! Not all dogs experience drowsiness on gabapentin, especially with medium to low doses. Also glad that all his testing came back normal. Always such a relief. :)

That loss must have been devastating, Johanna. I think most owners would agree with you that their spoos don't show any sign of slowing down until 11/12, but according to vets, spoos, like other similarly sized dogs, are considered seniors at age 5. I'm not in a position to say whether what I have experienced with Mia is because 1) I have more opportunities to observe her athleticism than many owners, 2) she was extremely active as a young dog leading to early onset arthritis, 3) her genetics and breeding are inferior, or 4) there has been a decline in health and longevity in poodles (or 5--something else). Perhaps @DogtorDoctor can chime in?
Personally, I would only call giant breeds seniors at age 5, or large-but-maybe-not-technically-giants (looking at you, Rottweilers). For most dogs, I start to say they're nearing senior years at age 7, but I mainly do that to emphasize the need for joint supplements, routine bloodwork, a closer look at necessary dental cleanings, and maybe a senior diet. I agree pretty closely with what PTP quoted above, actually!

We don't see many spoos in my part, though. All are young except for the sweet girl with doubly autoimmune issues, and she's still going very strong at 7!

I've not heard of other vets calling poodles seniors at five, either, but that could very much be a regional/local experience-based thing.
 

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Merlin hasn’t been feeling well since yesterday. He is more clingy and has low(er) energy. His heart rate and breathing rates are good. His temperature is about 1 degree celcius lower than it should be. He is eating and urinating. I haven’t seen a poop but he goes on the side of the house and it’s cold so I’m not outside and can’t see him. He doesn’t drink much usually and hasn’t gone to drink yesterday, but I fed him canned food, which contains lots of water. I put his pyjama on to keep him warm.

Oddly, his anxiety is lower than usual. This morning he went outside and had a treat. He wagged his tail a little. Now he is cuddling with me in a warm blanket. He usually doesn’t tolerate the heat (or cold) too long so he never stays very long on me. Let alone with a pyjama on and a blanket on top.

I’m very bad at deciding when I should go to the vet. I get worried very easily and usually take the dogs there really quickly. Most of the time I should have waited, it was just a temporary thing as humans have, and they were fine the next day. Vet prices have also went up so I would rather not do that and keep the money fornwhen they are really sick.

Of course if there is anything worrying I’ll take him immediately.

What would you do ?
Play some really short games with her (2 min or less). Give her tiny bite treats fo looking at you, give her a training walk around the kitchen, etc. Intermittently do these things. She may be bored, & training can be very satisfying for her if you start very small with expectations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
@JaneOnWhidbey it was purely medical, not a matter of being bored.

Also, Merlin has a generalized anxiety disorder and he wouldn’t respond well to typical training. But thanks for trying to help! :)
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Personally, I would only call giant breeds seniors at age 5, or large-but-maybe-not-technically-giants (looking at you, Rottweilers). For most dogs, I start to say they're nearing senior years at age 7, but I mainly do that to emphasize the need for joint supplements, routine bloodwork, a closer look at necessary dental cleanings, and maybe a senior diet. I agree pretty closely with what PTP quoted above, actually!
When you say "most dogs" near senior at age 7, does that include toy breeds/varieties? Since the carprofen helped in this case, I wonder if Merlin's starting to experience some joint pain/age-related aches and pains.
 

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When you say "most dogs" near senior at age 7, does that include toy breeds/varieties? Since the carprofen helped in this case, I wonder if Merlin's starting to experience some joint pain/age-related aches and pains.
For the little dog breeds that live forever, I would consider them seniors around 10 or so. But I still talk about joint supplements and increased anesthetic risks after 7, since a dog is more likely to have some sort of underlying condition by that age.

Arthritis can be activity- or injury-induced, so I find a decent number of dogs have mild pain before they're truly a senior pet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
For the little dog breeds that live forever, I would consider them seniors around 10 or so. But I still talk about joint supplements and increased anesthetic risks after 7, since a dog is more likely to have some sort of underlying condition by that age.

Arthritis can be activity- or injury-induced, so I find a decent number of dogs have mild pain before they're truly a senior pet.
I started giving him joint supplements but he stopped wanting to take them. He will be 8 in April, so I guess he’s more 8 than 7.
 
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