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An exercise pen like what Peggy has is very helpful. I use one to keep Ritter barricaded safely in my kitchen when I'm doing computer work at the table there. Puppies usually continue chewing up through 12 months, as the pressure of chewing promotes bone density and in the jaw. They'll keep chewing until the final adult tooth is firmly set and anchored. I don't want him biting my power cables!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
It looks like he might be on the verge of outgrowing his crate. My 24" spoo will fit in a 42" crate, but he's happiest in a 48." Weight based crate recommendations are misleading when it comes to Poodles, because Poodles are so leggy and lanky. It became very obvious I needed to switch out the crate when he could lie with his back against the crate wall and touch the opposite wall with his toes.
I hadn't even thought about it. We had been told he was a mini poodle and would take after that but...honestly, everything they told us has been a lie so far so...so we need to invest in a new crate and an exercise pen.
 

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Predicting the size of a puppy from two very different sized breeds is tough. It's hard to predict the final size of even a full bred poodle. My boy Ritter came out of a small dam, and the breeder repeatedly asked if I was OK with a small dog. The warnings were not needed. He is 5 months, almost 50 pounds, and has feet like oven mitts. He will not be a small dog, lol.

It's not unheard of for a miniature poodle to go over size and hit 16." A Newfie would be around 27". Splitting the difference would put your boy at a very typical standard poodle size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Predicting the size of a puppy from two very different sized breeds is tough. It's hard to predict the final size of even a full bred poodle. My boy Ritter came out of a small dam, and the breeder repeatedly asked if I was OK with a small dog. The warnings were not needed. He is 5 months, almost 50 pounds, and has feet like oven mitts. He will not be a small dog, lol.

It's not unheard of for a miniature poodle to go over size and hit 16." A Newfie would be around 27". Splitting the difference would put your boy at a very typical standard poodle size.
Even if he's only 10 - 20% Newfie? We did a DNA test on him because even our vet said he wasn't a Newfie mix so we wanted to make sure. He's our first dog and I'm starting to feel in over my head but he's my little boy
 

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Let’s put it this way: My dad’s not particularly tall and my mom is 5’. She has an actual Kentucky Derby horse jockey on her side of the family.

I measured in at 5’9” at my last physical and probably weigh about two of my moms. Lol.

If you’re feeling in over your head, it’s probably because you’re doing what so many of us do: Trying to reinvent the wheel.

Puppy rearing requires finesse and adaptability, but a lot of it is just science. If you’re not following a manual written by an expert, you’re setting yourself up to feel overwhelmed, and you’re setting Coco Pebbles up to feel very confused. Don’t try to reinvent the wheel. :) Pick up a good puppy guide and start applying it today.

Once you learn to speak puppy, you’ll feel much more confident problem-solving and Coco Pebbles will feel much more confident, too. But the basics are: Reinforce (i.e. reward) desirable behaviour. Don’t reinforce the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Very good advice from Skylar re: exercise limits. Peggy’s perfect puppy walk was a slow sniff around the outside of a big box store like Home Depot or Petco. We went at her pace and let her soak up the world.

For rest periods, I think you’d probably be better off with an exercise pen to contain the chaos during the day and teach safe, comfortable, easily enforced boundaries. This was Peggy’s set-up:

View attachment 479313

Crate training is not putting a puppy in the crate and leaving him there while he thrashes and squeals in misery. That’s no fun for him or you! Crate training is teaching him that the crate is a safe and comfy space, and that he is rewarded for quiet, rewarded for calm.

Have you read Ian Dunbar’s Before and After Getting Your Puppy? If not, I’d read it cover to cover tonight and start implementing some of his methods. Consistency is key, especially for clever poodles.



Also available online for free:


Do you happen to have a recommendation for pen style, brand, size? They're so many out there and he's so strong I'm a little worried he'll be able to move it
 

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Do you happen to have a recommendation for pen style, brand, size? They're so many out there and he's so strong I'm a little worried he'll be able to move it
He’ll be able to move it. He could probably even climb it or jump out of it. That’s where the training part comes in. You’ll have to teach him that good things happen when he’s calm in there.

It may go quickly, it may take a while, but if you want a happy dog (and some peace and quiet!), you can’t rush the process. I’d suggest seeking the help of a certified trainer if you’re feeling really unsure of how to start.

Our pen is a 36” tall style from Frisco:

 

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I don’t recommend the top paw ex pen. I got it because I could get it same day but the door is so fiddley-definitely stick with a slide-bolt like the one on the pen ptp linked. I have 2 Midwest’s like that and they’re great.
 

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Don't forget to wear your pup out mentally, my advice is to channel that energy, I bought 101 dog tricks to mentally wear out my busiest pup. I also taught all my dogs, adults and pups to bark at a conversational level even a 10 year old dog, although I don't suffer from migraines, I have family members that do, I am sensitive to noise.
 

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Do you happen to have a recommendation for pen style, brand, size? They're so many out there and he's so strong I'm a little worried he'll be able to move it
I've been using a 144" Toddleroo Play Yard. They also come in 198". There are several things I like about this design. One is that it only has vertical bars, no horizontal. This makes it harder for the puppy to climb. The only place he can place his feet is on the top rail. The bars are very strong, so the panel won't buckle if the puppy does try to climb over. Finally, the pen has a gate, so you can get in and out easily without needing move the whole enclosure or to climb over a 30" panel yourself.
 

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Do you happen to have a recommendation for pen style, brand, size? They're so many out there and he's so strong I'm a little worried he'll be able to move it
I will never forget the day (night 🤣) Whiskey jumped out of the brandless one-piece ex pens recommended by the store “it’s heavy, it won’t topple and he won’t be able to jump out of it”. Second week of coming home, the pen toppled when he wanted out. Less than a month later, Whiskey jumped out of his pen even though we’ve been training him not to do it and had a spare modular ex pen piece on top.
4 months later, there is nothing blocking him from jumping out over top, but he’s also grown to a point where he can look over the top of his pen to see me if he pleases and has not tried putting his paws on top for the last month.

We also use a modular ex pen piece to block off our rooms because he’s not an adult (mum’s words) yet and cannot be trusted in the rooms with lots of exciting “chewies”. He knows how to pull/shove it to get in but has also learnt to respect boundaries. It was a lot of him getting in and us bringing him out. And smarts on our end to make it so that he can’t open it.
 
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