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We haven't done a lot of hands on socializing but I anticipate we will see something similar with Oona, who is mostly indifferent to humans outside her household unless they are an old lady cooing at her (<3 <3), a child she'd like to chase, or someone on wheels. Occasionally we encounter someone who she decides is scary or interesting in a tense way if that makes sense, and there is not a firm pattern to it that I can discern. It's more often men than women but the occasional woman will make her nervous too. Maybe it has something to do with their gait, smell or body language. I think we have to take it slow and give the dog time and space to get comfortable. And keeping it light will be important I think, so that she's not picking up more tension from us. So far what we are doing in terms of training is giving strangers who are interested in saying hi treats to offer whenever we have the opportunity. And asking people who want to say hi not to pet her on the head straight away but let her come to them for a sniff. She's gotten to the point that when introducing her to a stranger she goes and sniffs and sometimes takes a pat, and sits expectantly for a treat, and if she doesn't get one from them, turns back to me looking for a treat. I think that's probably a pretty healthy pattern to start with for a shyer young dog - she knows what I expect and that I have her back. This has all been outside though. I think the game may change when people are coming into our home again if she is displaying nervousness around guests.
 

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It's so hard to know what they are reacting to or what associations they may be making. It's also hard when the dog behaves in a way that feels embarrassing or disappointing. But still with any time they're anxious or scared it seems like its important to follow the dog's lead and not push them. If Winnie loves to chew you can also use that as a distraction/stress relief option. When we are visiting with friends outside who have young boys with no impulse control who decide to run past Oona (which normally makes her crazy) if I bring a bully stick for her she's completely absorbed in her own world of chewing, lying by my feet. That way we the humans are able to hang out for a bit and the dog is occupied but safe. I'd love to hear how you manage this stuff going forward because like I said I think we will encounter similar situations with our pandemic puppy.
 
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