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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so I think I have voiced it many times before that I want a standard poodle, I absolutely love their elegant look and they’ve been my dream dog since I was a child.

The more I talk about it with my boyfriend, the more I start to realize that he might not be the biggest fan of spoos. He loves the look, but I don’t think he likes the size too much. Now that I think about it, he’s mentioned the toy and medium size before too. One day, when I get this dog, it’ll be 100% mine—we don’t share dogs but we sharethe responsibility if that makes sense. Since we share the responsibility, I do want him to be comfortable as well.

If that means I may have to consider a different size, I don’t mind. Well, okay maybe I mind a little bit, since I do have some problems I hope no one will be a offended by. The first is kind of stupid, but I kind of mind a toy lol. I already have a tiny dog and I don’t want her to be exactly ousted(joke, but my chihuahua tends to get jealous of anything that can fit on my lap)!Toys tend to get tangled up between my legs too; I can’t count how many times I’ve almost tripped over my dog. I don’t want to watch out for a another tiny dog. Not to mention, my favorite physical feature of a spoo is their muzzle, I really do think it gives them a certain...je ne sais quoi! It’s very hard to find a mini or toy without a tiny, extremely narrow muzzle. Don’t get me wrong, I find it cute! And maybe I shouldn’t compare it considering that really has to do with size and maybe nothing else?

I know there’s most likely a topic on here describing the difference in size and why they’re so different and why each one is so great, it may also link to articles too. BUT I really want to hear from the owners of the variations. What are the pros of each size? What’s the cons you’ve found? Why did you choose that size over the other ones?
 

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I have toys because I can’t deal with the physical activity needed by a Standard. Also, they’re easier to carry, cost a lot less money to feed and take care of in general. It takes less time to groom them as well and they take less space in the house.

But honestly, if I had the physical stamina, I would go for a small standard. Around 35-40 pounds would be my ideal.

Toys live longer than standards as well. I know some people here on the forum have mellow miniatures, but I’ve had one and she was just a nightmare. Miniatures are said to be the most active of the three sizes. Toys tend to bark a lot but they’re not as « crazy » as Chihuahuas. Although I deeply believe that if you raise your Chihuahua well, aggression issues are non-existent.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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Has he indicated what height or weight he wants? Since poodles are all one breed, it may be most helpful to identify what size you want first, then determine what variety describes that size.

Standards are defined as over 15" at the shoulder, so they are really quite small at the low end. Many people are attracted to this "over sized mini" size as a balance between small enough to handle but bigger than a small dog. Show spoos are 20-22" and 40-45 lbs, which is a great size for many people: small enough to lift, but big enough to be a big dog. Of course other people enjoy other sizes.

One last point: poodles are deceptively light for their height. People are always surprised by how light my dog is, even if she towers over their own, much heavier, dogs. I say this because it may be best to investigate both height and weight, not one or the other, to ward off any surprises.
 

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I love that Peggy (45 lbs, 21.5") is a couch potato. This actually isn't even something I knew about spoos, but I'm learning is quite common.

I originally wanted a mini because my last girl was half mini and sooooo so very sweet. But we live in an area with abundant predators and like the thought of enjoying a beach day without the worry of an eagle swooping down and attacking our dog. I also wanted a hiking companion for my husband, to alleviate a little of my wifely worries. And I figured now, in our 40s, is a good time to enjoy a larger dog.

Do I regret our decision? I did.

Many, many times during Peggy's first year, I screamed silently to the heavens, "What have I done????!" She just grew out of that cute little fluff ball stage so fast, which made her puppy antics more challenging, especially when they involved strangers.

But as she evolved into a cuddlebug, I began to deeply appreciate her size. There's something rather extraordinary about having that big head draped across my lap, smooching her solid muzzle and spooning for naps. She also tucks into such a neat ball on the couch. The three of us still fit fine in front of the TV.

The thing is, while previously I fantasized about possibly, someday returning to urban life, I can't imagine navigating our day-to-day with Peggy without a yard. It's easy enough to exercise her when we feel well and have the time and energy. But some days I rely heavily on the ability to just sit in the backyard and tell her to zoom. She needs considerably more space than my mini did to really stretch her legs.
 

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What breeds of dogs is your boyfriend used to? As mentioned above, poodles are very light. Poodles can easily be trained to sit instead of jump on people.
 

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Spoos from lines with lots of conformation dogs tend not to be giants since most judges don't put up giants. My two spoos are 22 3/4" and 36-37 pounds for my girl and for my boy 24" and around 47 pounds. She is very dainty and super easy to pick up when needed. He is a bit more of a hunk but even with bad knees and an iffy back I can still get him on a grooming table. They generally aren't nor should they be giant dogs.
 

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We had just lost a greatly loved Aussie Terrier when we decided on a mini.

We had rushed that Aussie to the vet more than once and then helped him out when he had walking issues. I wanted a dog that I could pick up and one that I could hold in my lap. And, frankly, I wanted a dog that would be easier to train than a terrier.

There's so much about any size poodle to love.

What size is your bf most comfortable with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Has he indicated what height or weight he wants? Since poodles are all one breed, it may be most helpful to identify what size you want first, then determine what variety describes that size.

Standards are defined as over 15" at the shoulder, so they are really quite small at the low end. Many people are attracted to this "over sized mini" size as a balance between small enough to handle but bigger than a small dog. Show spoos are 20-22" and 40-45 lbs, which is a great size for many people: small enough to lift, but big enough to be a big dog. Of course other people enjoy other sizes.

One last point: poodles are deceptively light for their height. People are always surprised by how light my dog is, even if she towers over their own, much heavier, dogs. I say this because it may be best to investigate both height and weight, not one or the other, to ward off any surprises.
What breeds of dogs is your boyfriend used to? As mentioned above, poodles are very light. Poodles can easily be trained to sit instead of jump on people.
What size is your bf most comfortable with?
He's really use to small, petite dogs like Chihuahuas. He’s had them all his life, not having much experience with any other breed. His family isn’t big on dogs except our own and when we visit my family, we all have small dogs so I haven’t seen him interact with anything bigger than toy. Come to think of it, he’s only interacted with a few selected larger dogs at the dog park too whenever the usual people would show up. I think he really enjoys a dog you can pick up and hold. Maybe if I mentioned to him how light they are, he’d be fine with them lol.
 

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I wanted a moyen size, which in the US would be considered a small standard. I also insisted on an undocked tail. Ten years ago I was able to find exactly three spoo breeders who did not dock. The one closest to me actually specialized in moyens, but she gave me weird vibes. The second, highly recommended on this board, had a full list. The third was in Canada. Oh, and the stud came from a kennel that bred for oversized. I ended up with two pony sized spoos instead of the one moyen I'd originally planned. Whoops!

I actually liked the larger size once I got used to it. So, of course, I ended up getting Galen at a show kennel, and he's a shrimp compared to my previous two.
 

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I have had the pleasure of being around all three varieties of poodles, but I have had six toys and one miniature. A Standard is more dog than I wanted to deal with, I have a 15 year old chi mix and she is a handful.
There is a world of difference between chihuahuas and toy poodles, I love my gang and they have been trained to stay out from underfoot. A well bred toy is good tempered
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I wanted a large mini or moyen sized standard. In the end I have been very happy with my 16 lb mini. I like the long muzzles too. Large minis have lovely faces with nice longer muzzles. If they come from a good breeder. I wanted a dog that would be sturdy enough to bike and hike with. Misha is great for everything I do. And I like to be able to easily pick him up. But well bred minis are not easy to find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I wanted a large mini or moyen sized standard. In the end I have been very happy with my 16 lb mini. I like the long muzzles too. Large minis have lovely faces with nice longer muzzles. If they come from a good breeder. I wanted a dog that would be sturdy enough to bike and hike with. Misha is great for everything I do. And I like to be able to easily pick him up. But well bred minis are not easy to find.

It’s hard to find a mini or toy with a longer, slightly broader muzzle. Maybe it’s not the breed’s standard but would love to see more with it.
 

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I wanted a dog I could take camping and not worry about in the bush. One I could walk in a bad neighbourhood and feel safe, and bike with. I also just genuinely like larger dogs- at 50 lbs and almost 25", Annie is still much lighter and more maneuverable than most large dogs and easily pick up able. She loves to be picked up and held lol.. My next dog may be an oversized minj, or a small standard. Not because I don't like her size, just not sure I could fit two large spoos and two people in a canoe!!! Cons would be the shear size of her things. She takes up a lot of space in my subcompact car, and her crate is big.
 

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She takes up a lot of space in my subcompact car, and her crate is big.
Yes to this. Peggy has a 48" crate. It takes up a nice little chunk of our (former) dining area. Poodle legs are lonnnng.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I wanted a dog I could take camping and not worry about in the bush. One I could walk in a bad neighbourhood and feel safe, and bike with. I also just genuinely like larger dogs- at 50 lbs and almost 25", Annie is still much lighter and more maneuverable than most large dogs and easily pick up able. She loves to be picked up and held lol.. My next dog may be an oversized minj, or a small standard. Not because I don't like her size, just not sure I could fit two large spoos and two people in a canoe!!! Cons would be the shear size of her things. She takes up a lot of space in my subcompact car, and her crate is big.
Traveling with a larger dog seems tough! I love taking my dogs around the city and so I frequent trains, buses and ubers. A trip on the train doesn’t sound hard, but cars and such? I dunno lol. That’s when I think maybe a mini or toy sounds good.
 

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...Why did you choose that size over the other ones?
At my age, carrying a toy poodle (or two) is easy. They're pack-n'-go sizes, can easily be placed in a carry bag for short trips, a subway or train, and even in a store without being noticed. My small kennel cage fits easily in my car. A small to medium-small dog is easier to deal with if there's a weather disaster and you have to leave your home.

If you or your boyfriend like to jog or go on long hikes, a minipoo will easily keep up with you. I'll guess that a toy will too, but I haven't jogged in decades. A lot of people prefer a medium to large dog b/c they can "feel" it when hugging it. It's got "meat on it's bones", so to speak.

One downside of having toys is I'm more concerned about them getting hurt. When I took Bella to puppy kindergarten, there were several huge, rambunctious puppies, and the rest medium sized pups, some that were very active. Bella weighed 2 or 3 lbs and the trainer would not allow her to join the group during playtime; she'd have been crushed in one jumped on her.

You mentioned narrow snouts in toys. Yes and no. This depends on the breeder's lines. A longtime show breeder should have photos of parents, grandparents, even aunts & uncles, often framed in their office or house or online. The way that litter's ancestors look will give you an idea of what traits they'll likely inherit.
 

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I've used these photos before to demonstrate mpoo size in an every day way. The model is my Neo, who's at the higher end of in-size mini, about 14" at the shoulder, weight also about 14lbs. He's very portable, travels easily, and only seems small when curled up in a poodle ball.

On muzzle size and shape, like Vita mentioned, that depends on the genetics. As for exercise and energy level, once out of the loony puppy stages, every one of my seven mpoos have been as active, or not, as we are.

Here's a link to the illustrated breed standard. Technically and ideally, height alone is the only distinction between the varieties of poodle. Reality is a bit different.

Close up
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Profile
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Neo extended next to DH who is 5'9"
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Neo in arms
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Neo at the kitchen table (terrible photo)
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Neo at the kitchen counter (boy loves his food)
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...Not to mention, my favorite physical feature of a spoo is their muzzle, I really do think it gives them a certain...je ne sais quoi! It’s very hard to find a mini or toy without a tiny, extremely narrow muzzle.
...On muzzle size and shape... that depends on the genetics. As for exercise and energy level, once out of the loony puppy stages, every one of my seven mpoos have been as active, or not, as we are.
Gorgeous photos, Rose, and perfect illustration of the variation in muzzle size/shape, overall size and example of energy level. Nice too, that minipoos are a little bit too short to steal your food from counter surfing!

From the photo of the man holding Neo, one can see he's a nice size for someone who wants to feel like they're holding a dog with a some weight on it. My second favorite breed reminding me of this, along with the affectionate temperament, are cocker spaniels. I had one back in the '80s and she was the sweetest dog. They do shed, however, but I ran the brush over her every 2 or 3 days and don't recall dog hair ever being a problem on my clothes or furniture, and they don't have the extensive grooming needs of poodles, and she could easily keep up with me when I went hiking (waaay back then 😄).
 
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