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I found out today that the ASCA (Australian Shepherd Club of America) will also title poodles in herding.
Sigh I have learned I was misinformed the ASCA does not title poodles :Cry:

Of course my local herding co op is associated with groups that do ASCA, AKC and AHBA. AHBA does title poodles as AHBA considers Poodles a "Multipurpose Breeds With A Herding Background" Our instructor says for us to get 3 lessons under our belt before making any decisions about what direction we want to take in herding ie just a fun day with the dog, trial locally or get really into titles and trials with the dog.

We have one lesson under belt and came home with a list of commands to work on learning...

Of course Apollo was like hey these are new smells and then would do OH yeah goats herd wait what is that smell... It was really foggy so my son only managed to get a little bit of video. We were working on "Go Bye" in this snippet.
Apollo lesson 1
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Pella I am so psyched to know that this has you inspired to play in the rally ring. I hope you find a great class and have lots of fun.

Even on days when things don't go as planned (as they didn't for us today) it is still a better day to have spent it with Lily and/or peeves and all my dog show friends than to do almost anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
No I hadn't heard about her, but that sounds like quite a team building training program to get there.
 

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Hi - i didn't do this intensive training with my first standard poodle (who passed in Aug 2018) but I'm hoping to do so with my next dog since I'll be getting a puppy this time instead of a rescue poodle. I don't know if it will be rally/obedience/agility/sheep herding or some other thing... I'm still learning what's available and accessible in my area (Seattle)> Do you have suggestions of qualities I should look out for in a puppy? I don't feel the need to be super competitive in whatever sport we do, it's more intended for us to have structured activity together since I also want a dog who leans more towards being calm and companionship oriented rather than strictly play/activity motivated. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #68
dancingbird there are some people who specifically look for breeders that aim for producing performance puppies, but I don't think that is necessary or even necessarily desirable since a very drivey dog can be a handful to live with if you don't want to try for an Obedience Trial or Master Agility Champion (OTCh/MACh). Since the time I started this thread I have acquired a 2nd standard poodle who is also being trained for obedience. That is my dog Javelin. He is a very smart and biddable dog. He is on the way to potentially being an OTCh. He is from a very good breeder, but not a specifically performance oriented breeder. He has Ale Kai in his pedigree so is a very nicely built dog, but more importantly I think is that he is a happy and well adjusted boy, so he is interested in and adept at learning new things.


I would tell the breeders to whom you speak what your goals are. I would also look to see that the breeders you get seriously interested in are doing some sort of sporting activity with their dogs, conformation at least (good build and confident temperament comes with that), but if they do obedience or other sports as well so much the better.


As long as you have a well built, healthy pup and start doing fun interesting training games with the pup early you will develop a good partnership and help the pup to develop interests and abilities for great learning. If you are interested in seeing what kinds of work I have done in training Javelin please look at this thread. https://www.poodleforum.com/24-performance-agility-obedience-hunting/205393-javelins-road-ring-ready.html


I wish you success in finding a lovely puppy and that you take the plunge to do lots of fun things with him (or her).
 

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I'm going to sound persnickety, but performance events/activities for dogs are hunting, herding, and the like. This post is referring mostly to companion training...obedience, agility and rally. . Poodles can certainly do performance events, and there are many poodles participating in hunting, herding, nose work etc. I participate with my poodle in companion events. And we both have a lot of fun!

Also, hearing breeders say they're breeding "for performance" bothers me. Any healthy dog can be trained in obedience and rally. But a dog's structure is evidence of sound breeding practice. My toy poodle is from a breeder who carefully breeds for the show ring. My toy poodle's structure allows her to move fluidly and jump effortlessly in agility. She has the same eagerness and athleticism of her champion parents. Conformation is "performance" in many ways. Why separate out the correct body structure and soundness of conformation-bred dogs to declare "performance-bred" dogs? What does that mean?
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Well yes, your first paragraph is a bit persnickety since I don't care what you call the things you train for and do with your dog. Performance, companion, honestly who cares what it is called.

I do agree that it is sort of silly and downright meaningless for the most part for breeders to say they are breeding specifically for performance/companion and other events. There is no way for any of them to guarantee a dog will be able to do any particular kind of event because that is there vision for any pup they produce. That is part of why neither of my poodles comes from a "performance breeder." They are just healthy well built pleasant dogs who have been well trained for what I expect. I have two friends (real world) who are breeders (neither in poodles but both breeds you see in lots of sports). Both of them would probably describe themselves as performance breeders. One of them has a word of mouth reputation that does mean nearly all of her pups end up in homes with people who do agility and or other sports. The other one ended up stuck with two pups from her last litter. Reflecting back I think one of the big differences between them is that one has a large social media presence and the other doesn't. In other words their success in producing performance pups is driven strongly by presence on FB and such almost as much as through the past successes of their dogs, which they both have in multiple sports.
 
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