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Hi! I’m looking for some help in how to explain to my husband why a purebred poodle is a better/safer choice over any mixed breed that may be out there. Thanks for any help in organizing my thoughts on the topic ?
 

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Good breeders are careful about pedigrees and health testing, are aware of the potential health issues and what to test for. They take pride in the puppies they produce and tend to want to demonstrate the conformation and temperament of their dogs through dog sports. Breeders of designer mixes often are using less than stellar individuals of the parent breeds involved because, for example, a really good poodle breeder would not sell to or stud to a breeders of doodles. Breeders of designer mixes are unfortunately often chasing trends rather than thinking about the long term production of puppies that have consistent and reproducible characteristics. Think about labradoodles and their coat quality. There is little consistency and doodles are often shedders so the attribute of a non-shedding hair coated dog (poodle) isn't what the buyer gets.
 

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I don’t think purebreds are necessarily better, depending on what you want.

Lots of Heinz 57 dogs have very good health. Or not.

With a purebred, you know what you get, and what you don’t. That is the big advantage. You know size, color, hair type, basic temperament and so on. You can also see the parents and go back many, many generations. You know what diseases the dog might possibly have, and which ones he won’t because he’s been tested for.

None of that with a cute mutt.
 

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Rescue/Rehome most definitely has its place and is an option, though it seems everything has its Dark Side. Beware of import rescues like you Beware BYBs and Puppy Mills - same premise - different heart strings.

The other posters on this thread have given you solid reasons for purebred, so I'll only speak to the "mutts are healthier" myth.

Mutts don't have parent breed clubs who invest and fund health research and who have tracked their health for generations. I know of (and I'm sure there are others) a cancer study, an SA Study, and a Diversity Study funded at least in part by Poodle Health Foundation and PCA. At NOLA Standards, when I can support a study, like with swabs of healthy dogs or pup tails from their docking, I do. Samples are always needed from both healthy and affected dogs of our breed. And it's not just Poodles who have a parent breed club, all purebreds have a parent breed club who invests in their health research and who have tracked generations and sought to improve health while providing breeders with better breeding tools

So when you hear, "mutts are healthier", well if something's repeated enough people will take it as such, but know that it is without any substantial basis...

Best Wishes,

Tabatha
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I snorted.

Loudly

Mutt...sooooo...we know the mutt in question isn't inbred? No. We don't. We pretty much know nothing about it or its ancestry. That's why we call it a "mutt".

And I've had some great ones, Sooner and Heinz and Tom and Jerry, Captain Hook and Red :heart: But...well...I grew up in the country, and Heinz got AROUND. Vigorously...
 

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So what type dog are you actually looking for? Do you have reasonable expectations in what you expect? If you do go with a purebred from a reputable breeder, one who does health testing on multi generations. You will then have a better chance of having your requirements met. If you don't care and just want a pet and are not worried about potential health issues that could come up later in life then rescue. I actually like the look of many doodles but I won't support those breeding them. My neighbors have them, we have a big doodle breeder nearby. One doesn't shed, the other does, temperaments on one is fantastic the other is a wild man. One is very tall and long legged the other is quite squat. Both from same breeder. No health issues to date but they are both under 4 years old. Both are really cute. Price wise they are way way over priced and I personally feel the breeder is just taking advantage of the current market.
 

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The reason that I went with a purebred poodle is ‘all of the above.’ While it may not be statistically significant, I’ve had issues with my pound puppies. One of them had life long health issues. They were expensive to deal with and couldn’t have been comfortable for the dog. One had fear issues that I am still dealing with, to the point where I take days off of work for thunderstorms and take doggy car rides during the local 4th of July fireworks show as no treatment has been fully effective.

I understand that health and temperament aren’t a 100 percent guarantee with a purebred dog. However, the odds are better with a dog from a responsible breeder.

Incidentally, a colleague recently lost both of her doodles to genetic diseases of poodles. Had the parents been tested, her heartache could have been avoided.
 

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Well I think you have your answer, LOL I don't think genetic play a big factor in fear issues, I think that is a matter of getting them use to sights & sounds, many breeders do work on this and when you get your pup taking them out and about even if in a shopping cart helps acclimate them to different sounds. Mine jumped when he heard a really loud garage truck but I just made light of it and say its a truck its ok, he is fine with them now. Now problems with thunder storms he will look but mostly I make little of it. Yes buying a purebred pup gives you potentially a better chance but still you need to be sure who you are buying from..
 

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There are some great answers here. The only thing I will add is that some of the specifics of the breed are not easily found in non-poodles. I have allergic asthma that's so bad, I even react to doodles. I wanted a bigger dog and a standard poodle really was our only option.

It doesn't hurt that the breed is super-smart, athletic, affectionate and beautiful, but we needed a purebred because we needed traits that we could only find in our breed and I wasn't willing to take a chance on other dogs.
 

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I don't get what was rude about Tabatha's reply. Guess I'm a bit dense.
 

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I think you have to start from what you want in a dog and your motivations for getting one. Also, if you’ve had a dog before then use the lessons you’ve learned, not just about the dog but about yourself.

From that vantage we can all work back to decide if we want a particular purebred or a rescue mutt, a puppy or an adult, help from a breeder or not.

There’s no right answer. For some a purebred is worth the investment. For others it’s irrelevant.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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:ahhhhh:


Zooey'sMom - Noted you felt my reply was rude.
Noted you did not intend to Thank Me. :act-up:


Thanks, Johanna, we're on the same page.
All in all, hope with our different styles and thoughts we offered the OP some solid thoughts.


Tabatha
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I echo everyone who said your choice of rescue or purebred (or perhaps purebred rescue) depends on what you want to do with the dog.

I got Neely, my first Standard and hopefully not my last, because I was impressed with his grandfather. I wanted an obedience prospect, and we have 50-plus titles in rally and obedience--and counting.

I don't think we've talked about purebred versus purpose-bred, and that might be worth a brief segue. I'm friends with a woman who breeds Labradors. She is breeding not just for health and temperament, but the work ethic to become guide dogs and medical alert service dogs. A couple of these dogs are real rock stars in obedience, too. I guess "work ethic is work ethic." When you get one of her puppies--you don't get to choose. You tell her what you're looking for and she'll select a puppy she believes will share your goals. And guess what--they don't cost as much as doodles reportedly do.

But ... back to mutt versus pedigreed, I hunted up this very readable article (https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/canine-corner/201806/are-mixed-breed-dogs-really-healthier-purebreds) by Stanley Coren, who has written a bunch of dog books and has a regular column in Psychology Today. My takeaway from the article is that purebred dogs have a lower incidence of heritable genetic diseases than the general population of humans. Also, some genetic diseases have been eliminated in some breeds through careful genetic screening before planning a breeding. [Edited to add:] One thing the article points out is "mixed breed dogs were 1.6 times more likely than purebreds to be carriers of at least one of the nine recessive disease variants included in the analysis (30.3% versus 18.4%). Again it is interesting to compare this to the WHO data on humans which estimates that for a similar set of key genetic diseases approximately 35 to 40% of humans carry at least one defective allele which is a bit worse than the rate that we find in mixed breed dogs."[end of edit]

I've had several rescued dogs and a couple of purebreds, and I love and have loved them all equally.

Marguerite
 

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totally agree with most arguments that were brought forth here. For me the main qualm with for instance GoldenDoodles is that NEVER have I seen a really well bred Golden mixed with an equally well bred Poodle - never seen that ever - and probably never will! And I would be way too afraid to pick up the worst temperament traits in both and the worst genetic lottery outcome with such a long list of possible health problems. I know my groomer friend says they are a nightmare to groom and basically pay for her NY mortgage AND her winter house in Florida.
For me personally if I were not to go the way of extremely well-bred purebred - it would have to be rescue - at least there is a noble motivator to the gamble on size, temperament, issues etc.
Of course finding a true rescue has become harder and harder - when so many are truly glorified puppy mills - even really supposedly reputable ones...so there is that.
One of the best motivators for going purebred for me is preserving a piece of living history - especially when you look at endangered native breeds.
 

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I'll jump in on both sides of the coin.

Pure bred poodle because I love poodles plain and simple, I love the way they look and I love their breed traits, both fit my lifestyle and personal taste. Pure bred means that you as going to have a very high chance of getting the breed traits and looks. All dogs are different and there will always be a pure breed that goes against what is general for it's breed, still I always go to my pure bred poodles, just can't imagine not having one and the few times I didn't seem so empty to me, like something was missing. So there is your reason for a pure bred.

Mix breeds. Besides my poodles, I have always had at least one county pound adoptee. Some of them have been pure breeds, but most are mixed. With them I get the adventure of discovering their personalities. You can take a good guess at what is behind them, but you sure never know how the various breed traits are going to interact with each other. I've dealt with Miss Pops who had the bull headedness of a chow with the intelligence of a Golden retriever(not a good combination) and loyal to a fault, Roscoe, some sort of yorki/ whatever cross that I raised and gave to my then young niece as a perfect playmate and protector, and now my Eustace, a airedale/hell hound cross, who is by far the quirkiest dog I have ever shared my life with, I still haven't figured him out, but he really is a very good natured dog and a never ending source of entertainment when I'm not ready to kill him and somedays I love him even more than my perfect poodle puppy just because he is so unpredictable.

And I will also pitch in on the mix breed being stronger side. It is not always true. Miss Pops had hip dysplasia, something I have never had in my spoos even though it's in their breed background, just bred out by responsible breeders to the point of being non existent (read up on Becky Mason of Bel Tor kennels and her dedication in eradicating hip dysplasia in her line) . Roscoe was blind from cataracts by the time he was 9. In short, a mix breed can pick up any number of health and behavioral problems stemming from the various breeds in his/her back ground, it really is a crap shoot because you don't always know how the various breeds are going to interact in a cross breed. As far as being longer lived, yes, that is true for the most part, but my childhood pet, Randy, a pure bred show cairn terrier, the dog who rode in the front basket of my bike, took down a police officer chasing someone through my yard, and tolerated my first mpoo, was put down at the age of 20 because my father loss the house and couldn't take him when he moved.
 

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Re: Marguerite' link on Post 15

Are Mixed-Breed Dogs Really Healthier Than Purebreds? by Stanley Coren (June 2018), who has written a bunch of dog books and has a regular column in Psychology Today.

... One thing the article points out is "mixed breed dogs were 1.6 times more likely than purebreds to be carriers of at least one of the nine recessive disease variants...
This is a valuable piece of research, and I'm glad to learn that Coren has a regular column in Psych Today. Thank you for sharing.
 
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