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I donate to North Shore Animal League because the money goes to the dogs and cats, and their work in finding them forever homes.

That being said, I looked up the ASPCA to see where their money goes and how much the animals get. Most of it goes to pay their employees and for tv commercials. They advertise an awful lot.

Out of &152,000,000 received in 2017, only 4 million were used for the animals’ care and feeding. That’s less than 4^. I think that’s pretty shabby!

So please, do some research on different animal groups to donate to before giving your hard earned money to people.

Thanks for consideration.


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I donate to North Shore Animal League because the money goes to the dogs and cats, and their work in finding them forever homes.

That being said, I looked up the ASPCA to see where their money goes and how much the animals get. Most of it goes to pay their employees and for tv commercials. They advertise an awful lot.

Out of &152,000,000 received in 2017, only 4 million were used for the animals’ care and feeding. That’s less than 4^. I think that’s pretty shabby!

So please, do some research on different animal groups to donate to before giving your hard earned money to people.

Thanks for consideration.


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I agree. Just because a group advertises a lot or sells a lot of merchandise or puts on big fundraisers doesn’t mean they are a responsible charity. It’s good to know others are checking into this, too.


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ASPCA is a joke to those who think they are actively rescuing animals! They DO have to rescue some, but their kill rate is so high it's ridiculous! They are really a lobbying group from what I understand, and I'd much rather see my $$$ spent in my local shelter than in Washington feeding politicians at fancy fund raisers! Our local SPCA makes it a point to point out they are NOT affiliated with the ASPCA! Many people do not realize they are two different prevention societies! Peta is associated with the ASPCA and I hate PETA!!!!!
 

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I am not a huge fan of the North Shore Animal League (which I have been to since it is near where I live, and where I have know some employees). Although as a 501 (c)(3) not for profit entity they do spend more towards rescue and adoption than many other agencies and organizations in this vein, but they bring dogs from all over the world including lots of parvo pups, Korean meat dogs and such. They seem to me to have gone from being a legitimate local rescue and adoption organization to a megalithic entity that is too big to fail and now is stuck on having to rescue rescue rescue when what we all really should want is to see no need for ongoing huge numbers of rescue dogs (and cats). It should be the goal of most rescue organizations to go out of business because they have helped people understand how to keep their pets except under the most extenuating of circumstances. I can see having small local rescues or breed rescues that handle small numbers of animals in extreme conditions, but personally I would much rather see many organizations focus on training in ways that eliminate almost all rehomes.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am not a huge fan of the North Shore Animal League (which I have been to since it is near where I live, and where I have know some employees). Although as a 501 (c)(3) not for profit entity they do spend more towards rescue and adoption than many other agencies and organizations in this vein, but they bring dogs from all over the world including lots of parvo pups, Korean meat dogs and such. They seem to me to have gone from being a legitimate local rescue and adoption organization to a megalithic entity that is too big to fail and now is stuck on having to rescue rescue rescue when what we all really should want is to see no need for ongoing huge numbers of rescue dogs (and cats). It should be the goal of most rescue organizations to go out of business because they have helped people understand how to keep their pets except under the most extenuating of circumstances. I can see having small local rescues or breed rescues that handle small numbers of animals in extreme conditions, but personally I would much rather see many organizations focus on training in ways that eliminate almost all rehomes.


I didn’t know that about them. And I agree, less rehoming. Unfortunately there would still be a need for rescue.


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It should be the goal of most rescue organizations to go out of business because they have helped people understand how to keep their pets except under the most extenuating of circumstances. I can see having small local rescues or breed rescues that handle small numbers of animals in extreme conditions, but personally I would much rather see many organizations focus on training in ways that eliminate almost all rehomes.
I completely agree. I did not know until I met my dog at her foster home that she was almost 6 years old and had lived with the same family all her life. I was heartbroken for her and for the family that had to give her up. I am thankful she was able to adjust to my home and is such a good fit, because it doesn't always work out that way...and then the rehoming process begins again.
 

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I completely agree. I did not know until I met my dog at her foster home that she was almost 6 years old and had lived with the same family all her life. I was heartbroken for her and for the family that had to give her up. I am thankful she was able to adjust to my home and is such a good fit, because it doesn't always work out that way...and then the rehoming process begins again.


I am happy for you and her that she worked out and fit in well. My first poodle was a rescue also. He had been given up at 7 years because he was doing things that were bad, and somewhat gross. He went through 4 adoptions before I got him. He was perfect for me. Never did a bad thing. He was pretty much perfect for me for the next 9 years. I can only think he was unhappy and acting out everywhere else. And that is just one of the reasons we will always need rescues. There are so many more. In that line of thought I will probably be looking for a local rescue to donate to.


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You really have to thoroughly check out “ no kill” shelters. I know the Orlando/Sanford Humane society (SPCA) is no kill. But there is a catch. The dogs and cats who have been there too long are sent to the county animal shelter, and they kill them.

Do rescues do the same? Do they give up n dogs and cats that nobody wants? They all say they don’t but...?


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If you follow Ian Dunbar you are probably aware that his main mission in seeking for owners to be better trainers is so that puppies are fully able to become wonderful adult dogs. It is his belief that good puppy training would eliminate lots of behaviors that people decide they can't live with later on in the dog's life (house soiling, poor ability to interact safely with other dogs, unreliable tolerance for diverse people (especially children) and destructive chewing). As he puts it the first thing is to lock the dog in a little used space such as a bathroom, basement or the garage. Once the dog starts barking incessantly to be allowed back into family space it gets tied up in the yard and then the neighbors complain and the dog goes off to the shelter or rescue. That sad path could be eliminated 99+% of the time if people really did the right things when their dogs were puppies. If that happened then the rescue industry would collapse in large measure. I would celebrate that day with the biggest party I could throw.


Please understand that I am not trying to say I think any of you who have rescue dogs shouldn't have adopted them, but rather that they didn't need to be rescued/rehomed in the first place.
 

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I do not think the day will come when shelters and rescues are not necessary, people's lives change daily from financially, divorce, illness, etc. So taking care of the local societies and rescues will always be a must. Nothing worse than seeing a little old man or woman having to give up their pets.

I have a friend soon to be a client, who is ill, but will not leave her home, because she has 2 little dogs 4 and 6 pounds, she adores they are about 9 years old. The children do not want her to bring the dogs, and the assisted living will only allow one of the dogs. So I am keeping my eye and ears open for some that would take both when the time comes, they are brother and sister. Breaks my heart, as I would feel the same. She was in the hospital many times and they are in the kennel, her last will was 4000
 

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You really have to thoroughly check out “ no kill” shelters. I know the Orlando/Sanford Humane society (SPCA) is no kill. But there is a catch. The dogs and cats who have been there too long are sent to the county animal shelter, and they kill them.

Do rescues do the same? Do they give up n dogs and cats that nobody wants? They all say they don’t but...?


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Many no kill shelters specify that they do not euthanize adoptable dogs...


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If That sad path could be eliminated 99+% of the time if people really did the right things when their dogs were puppies. If that happened then the rescue industry would collapse in large measure..

There are soooo many reasons dogs go into shelters that it’s crazy! I think those reasons make up more than 75% of the rescues. There are dogs that run away and are never found, people have to move, for many reasons, and are absolutely unable to take their dogs with them. Some people lose their jobs, the dog gets sick and they can’t pay the vet as most vets will no longer bill the person, so they give it up to a shelter. Others become old or ill and have no other choice. So many reasons. The rescue world will never largely collapse because the training, or lack there of, issue is just a small part of it.

You may have seen otherwise, but I volunteered for a rescue for many years, and I find this to be true.



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Let me add natural disasters to those lists of reasons jojogal. Every single shelter was packed after Hurricane Harvey and they didn’t have much room before. The public shelters have done large dogs for small ones exchanges, which I am in favor of, and taken pets from Hurricane Ike. I would be outraged about importing from Korea, because if crates need to be filled to retain a tax exempt status, that can happen locally.
 

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Let me add natural disasters to those lists of reasons jojogal. Every single shelter was packed after Hurricane Harvey and they didn’t have much room before. The public shelters have done large dogs for small ones exchanges, which I am in favor of, and taken pets from Hurricane Ike. I would be outraged about importing from Korea, because if crates need to be filled to retain a tax exempt status, that can happen locally.


Thank you for pointing out natural disasters! Didn’t even think of that. And I agree importing dogs to fill crates is reprehensible. I will no longer be donating to NSAL but will find one close to home. We have one called Little Dog Rescue where all involved are volunteers. At least I know most of it will go towards animal care.


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