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I am starting a new thread on this topic since there seems to be some interest.

The poodle standards for AKC (United States), KC (Great Britain), CKC (Canada) and most other countries specify that poodles are to be a solid color. Anything other than a solid color is considered a fault. Why the UKC does not follow that lead is a bit of a mystery - I fear it might be for more profit.

I suspect the reason for specifying a solid color might have to do with the fact that color goes along with other characteristics of hair. Poodle hair is supposed to be rather harsh and curly. The classic show grooms depend on the hair having enough substance to stand out from the body (as compared to a Maltese or a Yorky with their soft, straight coats, or all the breeds that have slightly stiff, straight hair). I suspect that the texture of the different colored hair areas of a parti-colored dog feels different. This could make it difficult to groom smoothly, I think.

Maybe another reason is that when hunting, a solid color dog probably stands out from the background better than a multi-colored dog - I don't hunt, so I don't know about that.
 

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Or maybe some early movers and shakers in the formation of breed clubs just didn't like multi-colored dogs for whatever reason, and decided to only allow solid colors. However, breed standards can, and do, evolve over time.

For example, the solid red Irish Setter and the Red and White Irish Setter used to be considered the same breed. However, the parti-colored dogs fell out of favor in the early 1900s, and people decided that only solid colored dogs with minimal white could be registered as Irish Setters.

In GSD, the color white has been in the breed from the beginning, and they were shown in the breed ring with colored dogs until the breed standard was changed to make white a DQ. You still get plenty of white GSD, and in UKC, they are shown in the same ring as colored dogs.

Maybe ten years ago, the Great Dane club changed the standard to allow Mantle as an allowed color. The pattern had always been in the breed, and were frequently used in harlequin breedings. They changed it again last year to allow merles (in both solid and mantle patterns) as an allowed color. Again, a color that had been in the breed for a long time, but not previously approved for the show ring.

In Dobes, dilutes have been in the breed from the beginning, but weren't approved colors in the beginning. Blue was added in the 1950s and fawn in the 1960s, I believe. However, the FCI standard still doesn't recognize fawn.

The basenji standard was changed to allow brindle after dogs imported from Africa introduced the color along with their healthy kidneys. .
 

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This just touches on the topic. Copied from Poodle History.org, article written by (Charlotte) Hayes Blake Hoyt (Blakeen Kennels), "Poodles Across the Pond" (Popular Dogs, 1937)

"We stopped at the famous Nunsoe Kennels of Miss Jane Lane, where I purchased a black and also a white grandson of Duc. Miss Lane has over 100 Poodles at her kennel and many of them are really beautiful dogs excelling in size and soundness. I was greatly impressed with an apricot-colored male which belongs to both Miss Lane and Mrs Ionides. I doubt whether we could keep this beautiful color in America, owning to our bright sun, but it is exquisite, and this particular dog is a marvelous representative of the breed. I was glad to see Miss Lane's dear old Ch Christopher Robbin again, and he still rules the Nunsoe household!

"Miss Lane has started the particolored Poodle in England and I saw a litter of particolored puppies, very evenly marked black and white, with all black leathers, and white muzzles. At present in England they have a special particolored class for these Poodles, and Miss Lane tells me that they are becoming increasingly popular. I must confess that as a conservative, I do not like them, feeling that, as we have worked so long to get the solid color, Poodles should remain solid color. But I must admit that for particolors these dogs were most evenly marked, and quite stylish in appearance."

Andress (poodlehistory.org)

This makes me wonder what the long work was to get the solid color.

Not intending to take this off topic but, naturally, I'm diving into the internet using "nunsoe particolored lane" as my search and am finding interesting sites, some referenced before in other threads, I think :)
 

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I have always thought the long work was related to abstracts. Abstracts were undesirable and parti was a gene that perpetuated abstracts so perhaps it was eliminated in an attempt to limit abstracts.
 

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In Portuguese Water Dogs, the AKC allows any amount of white but in Europe/FCI the amount of white is capped at 30%. The skin under black PWD hair is blue skin, and the skin under any white hair (even on the same dog) is pink skin. I also see this skin color difference on my blue poodle who has a small patch of white on his chest.
In the hot sun, during a long day of boat work, the PWD’s blue skin does not burn. The pink skin under a white coat burns, which is not practical for the dog or human. Any puppies that were predominantly white were culled, thus removing the expressed white genes from the genetic pool. Almost all PWDs until recently were almost entirely solid, with the most common white expressed on the chest. Since there is no limitation on the amount of white that can be seen in the AKC show ring, you much more commonly see what could be described as the ‘parti’ color gene expression in PWDs. I do believe that barring parti poodles from the AKC show ring only hurts the breed’s genetic diversity, as it is a naturally expressed color pattern.
 

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I don't know how other hunters look at dogs & colors. I am a hunter myself. Most of the dogs I see hunting waterfowl & upland game birds very much blend in with the surroundings. I look at the hunting breeds in general & with the exception of the Beagles white tail tips that helps you find where the little bugger is in the brush, many of them have broken patterns & roaning that helps them cammo in the ground cover. We tend to use flourescent collars/harness to bring to the attention of other hunters as it can be spotted from great distances but they claim it doesn't stand out to game.

The whole parti colored Poodle issue is a bur under my saddle blanket with AKC. It might just be part of my general nature but I think if a naturally occurring color is excluded from the breed ring, the answer to the question 'why' should be there. I suspect that the reason of "cause we don't like them" doesn't sound very mature or legit so they don't state a reason. It should be a requirement in all breed standards because without the knowledge of the 'why' history is bound to repeat itself. I bring up the Doberman again because I know the 'why'. Certain colors were culled at birth because they produced health issues. This information was passed down. When you asked "why" you were told. Fawns tended to be smaller dogs, finer boned, & skin issues were more prevalent. The blues could be really big, thick built dogs but they had skin issues, heart issues, etc... Breeders who had early on had enough of these pups & kept back dogs of this color to prove the why, culled without hesitation. As a general rule, if you spoke to a breeder & he had a litter of 3 Dobermans, you asked. Some would tell you they culled out the off colored dogs, others would not admit it for fear that no one would buy from them, & of course sometimes it was honest, the dog only had 3 puppies. And if you ever had a white pup born, you did not breed that pair who produced that again. So in this breed I know there was a why behind there being 2 colors until finally someone let the others in. As of 15-20 years ago, you bred dogs who produced the dilutes... many breeders left you to play color games & did not touch your dogs for their future lines. The problem happens when we don't know the reasons behind the exclusion. Without the why... we're all left to wonder & the breed can be taken into a repeat of the past where we have to discover the why.


There is truth to the saying that Knowledge is power.
 

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More from Poodlehistory.org, going further back into old literature mentioning breed standards
PBSTD (poodlehistory.org)

Excerpting relevant passages

"Perhaps the most interesting of these in the context of a discussion of breed standards is that of Furness (1891) who was writing during the period of foundation of the various kennel clubs (The Kennel Club, 1873; AKC, 1884; CKC, 1888; UKC, 1898). Furness wrote a description; however, his text appears--lightly edited--in the first volume of POODLES IN AMERICA (1960) as a pre-breed-standard. Typically, those writing these descriptions were very knowledgeable about sound generic conformation--so they were not uncritical--but they were relatively unjudgemental in relation to regional variations and other inessentials relative to function and correct temperament to perform that function. By contrast, a breed standard is by definition judgmental, and, perhaps most important, is restricted to what the eye can see: the working essentials of correct temperament are merely implicit in any breed standard."

(This is not describing the official breed standards, only describing the Poodle itself. Links to official breed standards of the time can be found here. and here.)

Furness 1891
The American Book of the Dog (1891)

"Of the four varieties of Poodles, the largest is the Russian which is quite rare both in this country and England. The usual color is black but they are sometimes white, or black and white."

"The German Poodle, which is really the type of the family,...In color the German Poodle is black, white, black and white, and occasionially liver-colored, though the last, to my mind, should always be looked upon with suspicion..."

"The French Poodle, or 'Caniche' (derived from the word canard--a duck...)In most respects, he is like the German Poodle, though generally a smaller and more slightly built dog than his Teutonic cousin. The colors of Caniches are the same as those of the German Poodle, and solid colors are deemed absolutely essential for a good dog."

"The Barbet is, or should be, a miniature Caniche...The color should be white, although many good dogs are seen with fawn markings, especially on the ears and back.



(bonus round, nothing to do with color)
" great care should be taken in selecting the sire and dam, and the pedigrees of both ascertained as fully as possible, for the modern Poodle, like most of our manufactured dogs, if I may be allowed that expression, has a great tendency to breed back; and indeed, in nine cases out of ten, it is but a waste of time and money to get a Poodle dog and bitch of unknown genealogy and expect to get good puppies"

"....when he has once reached maturity there is no dog so healthy or hardy as a Poodle. He is also, in my opinion, more susceptible of education than any other member of his race, seeming to have an innate love for tricks, and needing only to understand what you wish to do it immediately, and then enjoy the fun of it as much as you do.

"Yet, notwithstanding his wonderful intelligence, the greatest patience is required in teaching each new trick. Remember that he is even more anxious to understand you than you are to make him comprehend what you wish, and that a word of encouragement or a friendly pat on the head goes ten times as far as a scolding or a blow. At the same time, bear in mind that the greatest firmness is required, for if a dog for a moment suspects that your whole heart and soul are not in the matter, he at once thinks it must be of small consequence and loses all interest in it forthwith.

"Make him think you are both doing something for mutual amusement, and he will respond and do everything in his power to follow out your wishes, provided he is already firmly attached to you; and in this lies the secret of success or failure in all training; for as he cannot understand your language, he must know by heart all your gestures and intonations....")
 

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"Make him think you are both doing something for mutual amusement, and he will respond and do everything in his power to follow out your wishes, provided he is already firmly attached to you; and in this lies the secret of success or failure in all training; for as he cannot understand your language, he must know by heart all your gestures and intonations....")
This is FABULOUS. :love: Might need to make an addition to my signature.
 

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Without the why... we're all left to wonder
This is where I find things a bit muddled.

The Kennel Club (UK) was founded in 1873, before the AKC was in 1884 (ETA 1878 is when the nine original charter breeds were recognized here. 1884 is the first official meeting.) The Poodle Club of England seems to have set the original breed standard in1886 which then seems to have been adopted by the AKC by at least 1905 and revised or updated several times by the AKC until the Poodle Club of America was formed in 1931. The Poodle Club of America wrote their "new" standard in 1932 which was approved by the AKC and published.

I've pulled this info from Poodle History (links in prior post), the AKC site here and the PCA site here.

If I'm following the trail correctly, the original breed standard was written by the Poodle Club of England and used by the AKC from at least 1905, with changes til 1932, when the newly formed PCA wrote their own standard, apparently for the first time.

A constant thru these changes is that although parti-colored poodles are clearly a part of poodle history, starting by 1886 and by the Poodle Club of England, only solid colors were accepted as breed standard.

So, we still don't have the Why but we may have the Who.

The wording referencing AKC approval sent me searching to find what happens if they don't. I haven't found that answer yet but it reads possible here that the Breed Club proposes, the Kennel Club disposes.

(Sidenote-the 1886 PC of E standard notes "red" as one of the colors, and whites are allowed liver points! As I look thru the changes in the standards thru the years, there have been more than a few. Five of the different standards are here on the same page so it's easy to compare. The variations include weight limits, coats go from silky to harsh, lemon ears on white poodles, toy poodles lose 2 inches, and more.)

I hope I can find some of the books referenced somewhere.
 

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My assessment is that the "why" was the usual "why" most things happen in human history: some group of rich, greedy douche bags write or re-write rules, regulations or laws, and lie and revise history to destroy their competition so they can profit.

Here are some excerpts from this article below, which has 14 photos of parti paintings from the 1400s thru 1800s.

History of the Parti Poodles & Parti Poodle Information

"The "parti poodle" is the original poodle. When describing, drawing, painting, and discussing poodles in the 1400s, 1500s, 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s the color was most often parti-colored.

"In fact, the first ever dog book for the United States of America has a parti-colored poodle for "The Poodle". So pre-early to mid 1900s a parti colored poodle was what people automatically thought of when they thought poodle...

476157

"The Poodle"

"It wasn't until the early 1900s did the horrendous act of killing (culling) parti poodles become very trendy. During that time solid became the preferred color, and the popularity made its way into the United States where many ignorantly fell suit. (some of that ignorant mindset it still in play today with pridefully ignorant people).

"In that time period there were a few notable kennels that continued to breed parti poodles even though many were working hard to eliminate the parti poodle from poodle history, one of which was named Vulcan Kennels of England. Many of the Vulcan Kennel partis were derived from poodles bred by Jane Lane of the famous Nunsoe Kennels. So though there were breeders culling partis, there were still admirable breeders that were dedicated to breeding superior original poodles."


So Jane Lane bred parti poodles. Some rich lady who owned Vulcan Kennels used some of her solid poodles to breed more solid poodles. We can deduce this was to offer and sell solids to other rich people as something different, sort of like what doodle breeders began doing in the past 30+ years. We know these were rich folks b/c no one else had the time and money for idle pursuits such as dog breeding back in jolly ole England. I checked and was correct:


"The Montagu Matysik story begins with Nellie Ionides – friend and confidante of Queen Marywho in the 1930s started England’s largest standard poodle kennel, Vulcan, and kept it going through the darkest days of World War II." (link)

You'll see a lot of nice photos of gentile poodles at that link, but not pics of the slaughter of innocent poodles born with the bad luck of being partis. That part of the history was sanitized.

So the Queen's rich buddy Nellie set up what we would consider a puppy mill, and used that power & influence to promote solid color poodles - at the expense of the more commonly colored and historic parti poodle. I'll bet she hated Jane Lane's guts, too, throwing her and her partis under the carriage, or in common vernacular, under the bus. Oh can you imagine the drama? Brits were always suck ups to the Queen, so the culling began along with sanitizing the profit motives that led to this. It spread throughout Europe and reached American shores in the 1900s when rules of "acceptable" colors in poodles began.

This takes us back to the first cited article:

"There were two main ways some breeders and show dog people worked to eliminate the parti poodle: 1.) By killing them (also known as culling when it refers to dogs or animals) 2.) By purposely not registering them. So when a solid poodle would produce/birth parti poodle puppies (as they often did since they themselves came from a parti), the breeder would only register that poodle as having solid-colored puppies, this went on for generations and generations. This unethical practice actually taints the true pedigree of many poodles born between the late 1800s and late 1900s/early 2000s..."

To read the rest and see many parti paintings through the ages and connecting the dots, read those two articles, here and here.
 

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If you watch how modern breeds and breed standards are created, there's a lot of emphasis placed on distinctiveness and consistency. Given what Rose said above about how hard the early breeders worked to fix solid coloring in the breed, I suspect the solid coloring was a way to differentiate from related and predecessor breeds.
 

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If you watch how modern breeds and breed standards are created, there's a lot of emphasis placed on distinctiveness and consistency. Given what Rose said above about how hard the early breeders worked to fix solid coloring in the breed, I suspect the solid coloring was a way to differentiate from related and predecessor breeds.
That kind of makes sense. Hounds and fox terriers are often parti-colored, as the white patches make the dog easier to spot from a distance as it works a scent or disappears down a hole. Likewise, working dogs - collies, guard dogs, ratting terriers - tend to be piebald, brindle, or tan pointed. It would make sense that breeders might want to focus on solid coloring in retrievers to emphasize that these dogs were impeccably bred and impeccably trained.
 

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The culling is fact but some of the rest of Vita's post is not in agreement with what I've found.

The first breed standard that I've found so far was set in 1886 which is in Victoria's reign, well before Mary. Solid colors were required to meet the standard by then. Victoria's interest in dogs is generally credited with the "birth" of modern breeds, "manufactured" as Furness wrote, and of dog shows, the kennel clubs and breed clubs. Not surprising that the fancy was the hobby and passion for many of the "idle rich" as who else could afford to indulge and support this?

Miss Jane Lane was continuing to breed parti's as was Vulcan Kennels, so I think that was just misread.
476188

Miss Ionides and Miss Lane co-owned at least one dog, an apricot poodle (noted several posts above), so they likely had at least a neutral working relationship.

What I wondered after reading the various factors:
the colors of black, white, and black and white, the "suspicious" liver, and fawn
the rise of the fancy
type vs modern breed
form and function

I think prejudice had to be a factor, and my first thought was that it might have been to separate the working (water) dog type from the modern human-determined breed, and if maybe the completely solid colors were actually the rarer, making them more desirable to human nature. Unfortunately, still not finding concrete historical evidence for why solids became the accepted standard.

More from PoodleHistory.org

1800 [-05]. Sydenham Teak Edwards, Cynographia Britannica; consisting of coloured engravings of the various breeds of dogs existing in Great Britain, drawn and coloured from the life, with observations on their properties and uses.

"The Poodle" depicts a larger parti-coloured water-dog-type with an intact tail (dog reminiscent of Youatt's illustration which is the headpiece for this section) standing facing left, and a smaller dark dog, of a more modern type, in a slight play-bow, with a moderately-cropped tail and wearing the historically-correct Continental, including a tail-pom, facing right. (This image is available, as of 16 April 2001, at BIGgallery.com, 2708 Hawthorne Place, Nashville, TN 37212, http://biggallery.com for $US15., item AA027044, 14 x 11.5".) Here's a genealogical chart dated 1805 by its recent (5/2000) seller and which we're sufficiently confident comes from Edwards to park it here for the moment.
476196


The buyer, GL (who helped to jump-start the Poodle History Project's fine arts section, "Gordon's Poodle Visuals") writes: "Well, what I found interesting is that there are three sizes of Poodles given: Standard = Water Dog; Miniature = Small Water Dog; Toy = Shock Dog or Toy Dog. And that they are shown as being directly related with the last two being bred with the Spaniel to reduce the size. Now the MP has always been regarded as a 'modern' breed. This chart seems to confirm that the three sizes have always co-existed." It's obvious that we haven't yet thoroughly shaken down Edwards' famous book. If you're in the British Library, this is shelfmark 37.f.1.; please take a look for the Poodle History Project.
 

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The culling is fact but some of the rest of Vita's post is not in agreement with what I've found. The first breed standard that I've found so far was set in 1886 which is in Victoria's reign, well before Mary. Solid colors were required to meet the standard by then. Victoria's interest in dogs is generally credited with the "birth" of modern breeds
Oh well.

Did you read if the 1886 British breed standard rules included or excluded parti poodles? And how that came about, since it was before Queen Mary and Vulcan Kennels in the 1930s?

I'm curious when the parti purge began (and obviously not happy about it).

Btw, good sleuthing, Rose.
 

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Back to PoodleHistory.org for the Show Dog link and talk about developing Type to a standard. This is a very interesting page, touching on what is being discussed, except that nothing about parti-poodles is mentioned specifically.
Show dogs (poodlehistory.org)

but here is the 1886 Poodle Club of England Breed Standard (linked way above)
Breed standards: The Poodle Club (1886)
"General Appearance: That of a very active, intelligent and elegant looking dog, well built and carrying himself proudly.
Head: Long, straight and fine, the skull not broad, with a slight peak at the back.
Muzzle: Long (but not snipey) and strong--not full in cheek; teeth white, strong and level, gums black; lips black and tight fitting.
Eyes: Almond shaped, very dark brown, full of fire and intelligence.
Nose: Black and sharp.
Ears: The leather long and wide, set on low, hanging close to the face.
Neck: Well-proportioned and strong, to admit of the head being carried high and with dignity.
Shoulders: Strong and muscular, sloping well to the back.
Chest: Deep and moderately wide.
Back: Short, strong and slightly curved, the loins broad and muscular, the ribs well sprung and braced up.
Legs: Set straight from the shoulder, with plenty of bone and muscle.
Feet: Rather small and of good shape, the toes well arched; pads thick and hard.
Tail: Set on rather high, well carried, never curled or carried over the back.
Coat: Very profuse and of good texture; if corded, hanging in tight even cords.
Colours: All white, all black, all red, all blue, etc. The White Poodle should have dark eyes, black or dark liver nose, lips, and toenails. The Red Poodle should have dark amber eyes, dark liver nse, lips and toenails. The Blue Poodle should be of even colour, without patches of white or black, and have dark eyes, lips and toenails. All the other points of white, red and blue Poodles should be the same as the perfect Black Poodle.
Add to coat, if non-corded Poodle: The coat should be very profuse, and of hard texture, of even length and have no suggestion of cord in it and can be either curly or fluffy.

The Toy Poodle:
The Toy Poodle should resemble the Poodle in every respect except:
Coat: often softer and silky.
Height: under 12 inches.
Weight: under 10 pounds.

"Scale of Points:
General Appearance 10, Head 15, Eyes and Expression 10, Neck and Shoulders 10, Shape of Body and Loins and Back 15, Legs and Feet 10, Coat 15, Carriage of Stern 5, Bone, Muscle and Condition 10." POODLES IN AMERICA, vol. 1, pp. 17-18. This standard was published in the United States in 1905 (please see USA--American Kennel Club). Please note that in PIA 1, p. 18, under the final line of the Toy standard: "(This was added in 1905 in U.S.)" It's not clear whether the weight was added, or the entire Toy section; because this is not clear, we used the 1905 US version, and added this caveat.

The headpiece for this section is "under construction."

Go back to Breed standards
 

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I'm really enjoying this thread. Very interesting. It does appear that red is not as new of a color as I thought.
 

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It does appear that red is not as new of a color as I thought.
That had me scratching my head too. Like many of us, I've seen the articles about the reds being new, from the 1980's.

Some red and apricot history from the Apricot Red Poodle Club

Apricot Red History Project
History (apricotredpoodleclub.com)
"APRICOT FACT: The first known apricot, probably a standard, was born
May 7, 1898 by RUFUS [brown, out of Morning star, white (?)]. Her name was SOWDEN YELLOW GAL"


And this for the reds:
Red Standard History (apricotredpoodleclub.com)

"It took many years to achieve the quality and conformation that we see in the red standard poodles of today. The concept of developing a red standard poodle was first conceived by Ilse Konig of the Shangri-La Kennel when she returned from Germany in 1980 and admired a red miniature poodle at a dog show.

With the assistance of Janet Blanin of the Palmares Kennel in Oregon; they embarked upon an experimental breeding by mating a small English apricot bitch (provided by Shangri-la) to a red miniature poodle..."


This from Red Poodles | History, Color Changes and Breeding (allpoodleinfo.com)
Apricot Poodles | The Beautiful Color of Light to Dark Apricots (allpoodleinfo.com)

"Red only became an official AKC color in 1980"

---------------


And yet in the earlier PCE/AKC (pre PCA) breed standards below it's clearly noted "red". I thought it was possible that a different shade or tone was meant, rather than the red we think of, but it keeps getting mentioned.

from the AKC Poodle breed standards from PBSTD5 (poodlehistory.org)

Standard set by The Poodle Club in England in 1886 and published in the United States in 1905

"Colours: All white, all black, all red, all blue, etc. The White Poodle should have dark eyes, black or dark liver nose, lips, and toenails. The Red Poodle should have dark amber eyes, dark liver nose, lips and toenails. The Blue Poodle should be of even colour, without patches of white or black, and have dark eyes, lips and toenails. All the other points of white, red and blue Poodles should be the same as the perfect Black Poodle.


then
Standard published by The American Kennel Club in the first edition of Pure-Bred dogs in 1929

"Poodles are all black, all white, all white with lemon ears, all red, all apricot, all brown or all blue."

on this , no red but apricot is still noted (PCA now writing the standards)
Standard for Poodles as approved 1959

"9. Color
The coat must be an even and solid color at the skin. In blues, grays, silvers, browns, cafe-au-laits, apricots and creams the coats may show varying shades of the same color. this is frequently present in the somewhat darker feathering of the ears and in the tipping of the ruff. while clear colors are definitely preferred such natural variation in the shading of the coat is not to be considered a fault. Brown and cafe-au-lait Poodles have black noses, eye-rims and lips, black or self-colored toenails and very dark eyes. In the apricots while black is preferred, liver-colored noses, eye-rims and lips, self-colored toenails and amber eyes are permitted but are not desirable."


Last this, which I think is the current standard, red again isn't noted although that could be because red and apricot are on the same spectrum, or might be explained in this older thread on PF. (10) Red poodles recognized by AKC? | Poodle Forum

"Color: The coat is an even and solid color at the skin. In blues, grays, silvers, browns, cafe-au-laits, apricots and creams the coat may show varying shades of the same color. This is frequently present in the somewhat darker feathering of the ears and in the tipping of the ruff. While clear colors are definitely preferred, such natural variation in the shading of the coat is not to be considered a fault. Brown and cafe-au-lait Poodles have liver-colored noses, eye-rims and lips, dark toenails and dark amber eyes. Black, blue, gray, silver, cream and white Poodles have black noses, eye-rims and lips, black or self colored toenails and very dark eyes. In the apricots while the foregoing coloring is preferred, liver-colored noses, eye-rims and lips, and amber eyes are permitted but are not desirable.
Major fault: color of nose, lips and eye-rims incomplete, or of wrong color for color of dog. Parti-colored dogs shall be disqualified. The coat of a parti-colored dog is not an even solid color at the skin but is of two or more colors."


----------------

Putting these pieces together really is like doing a crossword puzzle without all the clues lol.
The breed standard applies to all varieties but maybe, the standard poodle somehow never showed up in red until the deliberate attempts in the 80's? That seems so unlikely but I don't know how to reconcile the appearing and disappearing red from the standards. I don't know how many times the breed standard has actually been updated.

(I'm trying very hard to ignore why brown doesn't appear until the 1929 standard-was the early red really just the brown spectrum? and silvers, grays, cafe's not until after that, and why cafe's but not silver beige...?.)

I think I've fallen down another rabbit hole. I'd love to get into some of these Poodle Club of America collection – American Kennel Club (akc.org) and there might be bits of interest here Digital Library & Archives – American Kennel Club (akc.org)
 
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