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When Clark comes home, I wonder if I should give him a week to settle in before I start training basic commands. The breeder will start pee pad training and I will continue that immediately. I just don't know when it would be appropriate to start working on "Sit", "Stay", "Leave It," "Come", "Quiet."
 

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I started training Noelle eye contact the day I brought her home. I played with a tug toy, took the toy away, waited for Noelle to look me in the face, and returned to playing tug. The ability to pay attention, to look you in the face when you ask, is the most valuable thing you can train your dog. Start the day you bring him home.

Check out Kikopup's puppy training videos and learn from her. They're on YouTube. Noelle wouldn't be the dog she is today without what I learned from Kikopup before I even brought my Christmas poodle home. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF26FD559887E7EA4
 

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I would start straight away, but make it a game and with tiny baby steps. Don't try to teach cues at first, but encourage the behaviours - hold a treat just above the pup's nose and give it to him the instant his bottom touches the floor; hold a treat in your hand and wait for him to stop trying to get at it and look at you; call his name and run away giggling and flapping so he runs after you - lots of fun games! I think Stay is a tough one for babies who want to stay close to you, so I would leave that one or later - Wait is more useful, and easier to teach.
 

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I too say start immediately in a playful way..............1st step is for puppy to learn it's name hahaha!
 

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You’ll be training anyway, in that your pup will learn something from every interaction. Think of the behaviors that you want for life. Do you want to use a crate? Try crate games. Will you ask your pup to wait to be released for supper? Start early. And work on resource guarding. Take the bowl away some times.

What I read in your post was about training verbal commands. Sitting for the sake of sitting is useful in the obedience ring. However, sitting on a mat when the doorbell rings is super useful. And a great behavior to learn without requiring a command.

It’s so overwhelming to try and do everything from day 1. Relax and enjoy the early days with your youngster.
 

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From the get go do things that are fun and increase your pup's attraction for you (centripetal attraction). Make games out of things. Remember not to put words onto behaviors until the pup really understands what they are to do and then couple the signal or luring you have used to a word. Later you will use either or a word or signal.


I really like all of the suggestions you have above and will add one more which is to play with your puppy to the point where he is very excited by your game and then get up and run away. The pup will run after you. Before he gets tired/frustrated/disinterested stop and face the puppy to let him catch you and play another little game/give treats and such. Repeat this a couple of times a day and you will have a puppy that will follow you to the ends of the earth.


You don't have to do all of these things every day and you don't want to train for long sessions, five minutes of different things done throughout the day will allow you to keep your pup thinking this is all tremendous fun and give you frequent opportunities to make him a rock star.
 

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Lily's game of get up, run away, let the puppy catch you, and throw a party is a foundation for coming when called. It's also incredibly fun for both you and your puppy. I hid behind trees and pretended I didn't want the puppy to find me, then laughed about how clever she was for finding me.
 

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You could start the obedience training since you bring him home. The dog can adapt to the new surroundings happily and instantly. But you may wonder if he can understand your cues or language and obey your commands. In fact, the training helps to improve pet ownership and reduce the gap between you and your dog. You can start with the basic training, such as "watch me" and "sit". The dog sent to the school for being a service dog or working dog has to learn the obedience training in a short time. He/she has no time to build a close relationship with the trainer at first, but most of them still finish the course successfully. Also, potty training can begin when he goes home. Otherwise, it's hard to correct the fixed habit if he gets used to peeing at home.
Learn more about tips to help your dog adapt to your home in this article.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You’ll be training anyway, in that your pup will learn something from every interaction. Think of the behaviors that you want for life. Do you want to use a crate? Try crate games. Will you ask your pup to wait to be released for supper? Start early. And work on resource guarding. Take the bowl away some times.

What I read in your post was about training verbal commands. Sitting for the sake of sitting is useful in the obedience ring. However, sitting on a mat when the doorbell rings is super useful. And a great behavior to learn without requiring a command.

It’s so overwhelming to try and do everything from day 1. Relax and enjoy the early days with your youngster.

I appreciate your information.
You're right about relaxing...I just want to do everything right so that Clark can be a happy and well behaved dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You could start the obedience training since you bring him home. The dog can adapt to the new surroundings happily and instantly. But you may wonder if he can understand your cues or language and obey your commands. In fact, the training helps to improve pet ownership and reduce the gap between you and your dog. You can start with the basic training, such as "watch me" and "sit". The dog sent to the school for being a service dog or working dog has to learn the obedience training in a short time. He/she has no time to build a close relationship with the trainer at first, but most of them still finish the course successfully. Also, potty training can begin when he goes home. Otherwise, it's hard to correct the fixed habit if he gets used to peeing at home.
Learn more about tips to help your dog adapt to your home in this article.
Yes, I mentioned wanting to to continue pee pad training when Clark comes home.

I think he will be too small to go outside during the winter so we will stick with pee pads until he grows.

Thanks for all of the useful information and articles! The story was very helpful.
 

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Yes, I mentioned wanting to to continue pee pad training when Clark comes home.

I think he will be too small to go outside during the winter so we will stick with pee pads until he grows.

Thanks for all of the useful information and articles! The story was very helpful.
Just remember you have to walk him to the pee pad, and train him like you would if you were training to potty outside. I have pee pad trained all my poodles 6 toys and one mini. All but one were trained to potty outside and use a pee pad.
 
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