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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking of getting a 6 month-old standard poodle rescue dog for a companion. We've never owned a dog before. We live in a home, have an 8 year old child, a cat, and a 4-foot fence. We want to keep the dog inside most of the time.
I've been reading all the new posts and reading about standard poodles online. I really like everything I've read about this breed so far. They seem like amazing dogs. I do realize there is lots of grooming involved, and that is okay.
I just wanted to ask if there was anything I need to expect that maybe someone isn't telling me??? Just want to cover all my bases and get a feel for how it is going to go.
Do sp's jump on and lick their owners a lot? We plan on going to obedience classes, but wasn't sure if that could be helped or not.
And if you have any other advice, please let me know.
Thank you!
-S from Kansas
 

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I don't have a standard, so other's may correct me. The 4' fence would be a huge concern for me. Poodles are light and springy which made them an ideal candidate for the circus. You can even google a poodle doing backflips for Pet Star!

My mini can easily jump twice her height (2 feet) with no effort, and she is only 4.5 months old.

You can train a poodle what rules are acceptable and what is not (no jumping up on people and no licking.) I had an epileptic poodle that would nervously lick her paws constantly and had a tendency to lick my face the same way. I taught her the command "enough" and would sometimes offer my hand as a trade. She had a super long tongue too. :D

What I would be concerned about with a rescue is health and temperament. Sometimes seizures don't start until about 2 years of age. I'm not sure how von Wildebrands or Addison's would manifest itself. I can tell you that watching your poodle have a seizure is heartbreaking. Definitely not an experience I would want my daughter to deal with on a regular basis. A rescue requires a lot of patience, especially if there are any known obstacles that have already made an impact on their behavior.

I grew up with a poodle since I was 5 years old. Having a dog will be a great experience for her and will be her best friend ever (along with you of course). I would just take whatever precautions you can to prevent unnecessary heartache in regards to health and temperament.
 

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Hello:)

First of all I think it's great to have a poodle. Any dog really. Pure love and some good therapy for me!! HA! I am relatively new to poodles but not dogs or I hate to say this, high maintenance dogs lol, I have 2 pomeranians as well.

Thing's to know. They are so lovable, smart, genuine and human like - so it's easy to spoil them.

Thing's I discovered with mine that I might not have realized to some extent:


-----They are mouthers when they are young - work on this right away. They can be a little "nippy".
-----Grooming - as you might think is multiplied by 10! They need regular trimming and clipping of nails. They have to have their ear hairs in the canal pulled out. (That my BF does, I just can't - even though it doesn't bother them much) There is some initial expense with the at home grooming if you chose to get clippers, scissors and other grooming products.
-----Poodles are large chested and prone to bloat. Be careful they do not overeat or high energy after they eat.
-----House training with Olie was more time then I expected so I would be very strict with water and meals schedule and take him/her out often.
-----I crate train, it has been the most effective training I have ever been successful with any dog I have had or known. There is a lot more security with the dog and yourself should you chose this method. I felt it made it a lot easier to train him going outside as well as chewing. Now he loves his little den! :)
-----They like to jump, and to a point it's ok, but I would try to train down or off or they will as any dog try to jump on you and they grow SO fast so they get heavy quick.
-----Olie is not a big licker, he will but light and very little.

My BF wanted a man size dog - we agreed after long research that a poodle was the best fit for us. My goal was to let him establish the stronger bond, that has not happended..........We all love him SO SO much. I sware we are lucky we already had 2 great dogs and now Olie - it just gets better. I LOVE POODLES!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What to expect

Now I am scared, but I really appreciate you telling me that. That would be heartbreaking - I'm not sure if I could handle seizures. The rescue is 6 months old, at a vet's office, and they don't know any health history. Just negative for heartworms. So, do you think I should try to find a rescue over 2 years old? That scares me as well, because I have a cat and thought they should "grow up" together. Also, I'm scared about an older dog not being trained. Let me know what you think. Thank you so much!
 

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I've had toys and seizures tend to be more prone to the smaller versions of the breed. The other diseases though tend to be common in standards, especially with a pup from a back yard breeder or puppy mill. It may or may not develop any problems.

I just wanted to give you some things to think about. Ask around, especially your vet. This is why, even if you choose to go with a breeder, you need to verify that they do genetic health testing and breed dogs that have a predictable history for their health.
 

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BFF was good to tell you that about seizures as well.

Health testing is good but not always something available as a foster or adoptee. All dogs have some health issues. So do a google search also in regards to standards so you can be better determine. In the meantime there are many experienced people on her that have dealt with health issues and their spoodles.

It's a matter of what you can handle emotionally and also financially if something bad happens. Olie was worth the risk to me. As were my other two sweeties!
 

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its alot of work with the grooming and health tests but I think its well worth it
and needless to say rescuing any dog is really rewarding :D

we have a rescue Shih-tzu that the breeder left at the vet because of a hernia...we paid for the hernia operation and the neutering of him and hes one of the sweetest dogs around who was abandoned because he was "too much hassle"

I agree with Olie though, standards sometimes have health problems but if you're able to and willing to have him/her in your home I say go for it ^_^
 

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its alot of work with the grooming and health tests but I think its well worth it
and needless to say rescuing any dog is really rewarding :D

we have a rescue Shih-tzu that the breeder left at the vet because of a hernia...we paid for the hernia operation and the neutering of him and hes one of the sweetest dogs around who was abandoned because he was "too much hassle"

I agree with Olie though, standards sometimes have health problems but if you're able to and willing to have him/her in your home I say go for it ^_^
Wow Olie did have a hyrnia when he was born too! (Needless to say we got a great deal on him and the breeder?? did take very good care of Olie afterwords) I did not foget, but at the same time he is as good as new so we have moved past that thank god.
 

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Both of my spoos were rescued/private adoption, neither one had any health testing behind them, no papers, nothing. My male turned five in july and my female is turning four end of month. They are happy, healthy (knock on wood) and wonderful member of our family. Getting a dog from a rescue doesn't mean there will be problems, just like getting a puppy from a fully tested parents doesn't guarantee their health, although the odds should be better. My friend only adopts mutts from a shelter and her current husky/shepherd mix is 16, going on 17. He has slowed down a lot but he is still impressive!!!!
 

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I think its great you are rescuing and I would not worry to much about the dog not being health tested ;)

Seizures are rare and I would not worry to much about it. Being a young dog he should adjust pretty well to you and your family. My Standard does not lick, I have only met one who was a licker and even so she was not so aggressive with it and would stop when told. I have a 4 foot fence with my big Standard girl and she does bounce at it but never goes over, plus she is supervised when outside. Obedience classes are an awesome idea. I second the crate suggestion, I do not know what I would do with mine! (I have 7!)

Have you visited the dog? Why is he in need of a new home?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What to expect

No, I haven't visited the dog yet. I just heard about her. I called the vet a couple days ago and the lady at the front desk said they don't have family history, but it is negative for heartworms. I asked her if she had a good disposition and she said 'yes'. I haven't visited the dog yet because she is 4 hours away - but also I want to really think about this decision for a month. I'm kinda nervous! And if another family adopts the dog - I'm sure there will be another spoodle rescue (under 1 year old) out there somewhere. I really want a female, though.
Wow, keep the comments coming. I am learning so much. I am visiting my vet day after tomorrow, and I have lots of questions for him as well.
 

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I dunno about your rescues where you live
but here in Ohio rescue dogs don't last in a rescue more then a few days =\
so if I were you I wouldn't wait too long =[
especially if you really want that poodle
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What to expect

Oh dear! I hope she is still there. It's just that my hubby wanted a week to think about it.
So...sorry if this is a dumb question but - can I have someone groom her once a month - or do I need to do that AND do a lot of grooming at home on top of the once a month grooming. Just checking.
 

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Standard poodles are HIGH ENERGY dogs. How much exercise are you able to provide a dog? They need A LOT more than just running in the backyard.

Neither of my standards are big lickers, but one is a jumper and when I say jump, I'm talking getting 3 ft off the ground from a sit.

Depending on her coat, you may have to brush her often, or may not have to brush her at all. One of my standards does not get matts, my other one gets matts in his tail and where his collar rubs his neck. Keep in mind also that a groom can cost $40+ depending on where you go.
Since this is your first dog, obedience class is SUPER important. I would recommend finding a training school that uses positive reinforcement training as poodles can be sensitive to harsher training methods.

Do not rush into getting a dog just because she might get adopted before you have REALLY thought about it. It's a 10+ year commitment. You can also talk to breeders to see if they have older puppies/young adult dogs.

My first standard has epilepsy. It's a very heartbreaking thing to watch, but otherwise he lives a "normal" life with help from his medication.

Best of luck with your search for a poodle.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What to expect

I stay at home while my son is in school, so I do have a lot of time to give for exercise. I enjoy walking and hiking, so I think we are fine there.
I am concerned about our 4-foot fence. I'll make sure I'm in the yard with her, but I'm still concerned. If anyone else has thoughts on this, let me know.
I'm okay with the grooming.
I think that is great advice not to adopt until I've really thought about this. I really do plan on that. I'm anxious because this will be our first dog - so I really am doing a lot of pondering. If this dog goes to another owner, I'm sure I will be able to find another dog if we decide to move forward.
Thank you for giving me more to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What to expect

Oh, and I forgot to say that I do plan on going to obedience training. We live right by Petsmart and I think they have classes. If they don't have the classes I need, surely I can find something (I hope!).
 

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I'm anxious because this will be our first dog
OK, cut that out!!! Right NOW!!! :) You are smart to do your research and to think long and hard about adding a dog to your home (especially your FIRST dog) but, if you can help it, don't be "anxious". Dogs really can pick up on our attitudes and emotions and anxiety will not be helpful in acclimating a new family member.

By nature, I am not a worrier... I pretty much take things as they come and only worry when there's actually something to worry about - not before. That has served me well with my pack. I also do canine foster care for a local rescue facility and dogsit friends dogs in my home and I have never had an incident with the variety of dogs coming in and out of my home at different times. I know that if I had anxiety about it, my dogs would feed on that and we'd have problems...

As far as the fence - I'm sure there are poodles who can and would jump over a 4 footer... I think I've stated this in a different thread but the two adult poodles I've had in my yard have never even remotely attempted it. One is a dog we've had since a puppy and I think she just "knows" it's a boundary and not to cross it. The other standard poodle was a year old when we brought him home and it never looked like it even crossed his mind to try jumping... Maybe because it never crossed MY mind??!! :)

Good luck with whatever your decision is... and remember... stay calm and in control - no worries!! :)
 

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Locket I don't find them to be very "high energy" dogs in every line. Harry my black standard is pretty high energy but if he has a good romp every night he's fine. He does like to chew up things so he needs bones to be happy. I had that rescue Ginger and she was the laziest dog I've ever seen. She would run the backyard but in the house she was seriously a bum. I think it all depends on which lines your dog comes from. If the breeder is breeding for a high prey drive for hunting then yes your dog is going to need a lot of outdoor activity to keep it happy. Some are just great pets that settle in the house and get out enough energy in the backyard or whatever. I think it's good to let them run in a big way (like an open field or something secure) once a week. Harry seems to really enjoy that freedom.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What to Expect

Plumcrazy,
Hey girl, I like your attitude! Sometimes I really need people to remind me not to be such a worry wart!
Kpoos,
Do you think I can take this dog to the park and let her run in a big way a few times a week - or do I need to always have her on a leash at all times? I guess what I'm asking is - do they come back to you, or do they try to run off?
 

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I think thats dependent on the dog
Elphie doesn't have to be on a leash in our yard or at the park even with people around
she comes right back to me when I call her name

but our lab/poodle mix he has to be on a leash at all times he darts especially when people are around he wants to be right up on them investigating them.
 
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