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Discussion Starter #1
I have had a lot of fun in Annie's intro to dog sports class. Now we are on "intro to flyball" and I am less enthusiastic. Annie doesn't need help learning to be more enthusiastic about things, and gets bored and creative after a run or two/would like more variety. Still - it's a great class for working on calm and focus in a distracting environment between runs. Next in this series is an intro to agility, then morning practices I wouldn't be able to make.

Classes in the local kennel club start this fall, and I am trying to decide what to enter Annie in.

Obedience , Rally, Agility, or Scent. All are titling-focused classes, havent yet gotten class schedules to know if any wont work due to scheduling. Plus they are a bit closer to me, so better as it gets darker earlier.

I am leaning towards Rally or Scent... I am pretty bad at listening to verbal instructions, so I suspect Rally might be easier for me, and help work on the calm and focus I want. But scent work just sounds fun, and is a skill I want to learn to teach. Agility might be fun, but I
don't know if I could keep up with her based on our experience with the tiny bit of intro we have gotten so far (3 agility jumps). Obedience would be a good basis for other stuff... sigh, too hard to choose!

Which would you choose? What do you think?
 

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We're team rally and obedience here. They are challenging for the handler as well as the dog. I can't pick a favorite out of either one. The thing I like about rally is the course is always different, so I don't feel like I am repeating the same thing over and over. The thing I like about obedience is striving for precision. It really depends on what your dog enjoys and which sport you find fulfilling right now.
 

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I pretty much agree with Click although if you want great obedience I think that should be first since I think rally chops up heeling. Many will disagree on that though. The important thing is to do more and have fun with your dog.
 
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Rally does chop up heeling because of all the pauses and doing stuff in the middle. Plus, judges aren't as rigorous on where heel position is during rally. However, that being said, Noelle did obedience classes first. She and I failed at it. Then we did rally, and she and I loved it. Our success in rally gave me confidence for getting her CD. And now we are going to try for CDX in November (cross fingers).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well - I've emailed the kennel club to find out the schedule. I wont book until later until I am sure I wont have to go back to working in the office (and move away again). If all things are equal - I will try for Rally probably to get my confidence up. But I wont turn down any of the options if that's what works in our schedule.
I am likely to be changing meds again - not sure I will be able to manage agility :(
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The kennel club isnt holding classes this fall due to COVID and inability to rent training space, but i found a trainer nearby who is offering beginners rally classes, taught by a rally judge. Annie and i went and were tested today to see if we would be a good fit (i expected they would make me do the intermediate obedience course first).

Annie was on her best behaviour, and they said we could start with Rally!!! I am thrilled with her, she was very good in a completely new environment!
Especially considering she had major bout of zoomies last night at our final agility class - an hour long high energy class like agility is too much for her brain at this point. I could watch her getting more and more keyed up, as i tried to deflect and calm her the whole night. Admittedly, it was a way lower distraction environment, but she just settled into working with me and was her normal awesome friendly self, and did a great downstay while i practiced footwork. Helps when the trainer likes and understands the breed. Plus i got some great pointers on improving our heelwork and about turns that we can practice while we wait for class to start.

So - starting Rally in November. Good girl, Annie!
 

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Awesome! When I started rally with Lily 10 years ago it was a pretty new sport and frankly we did not need to train or practice to qualify in novice or even much in advanced. We went through those titles in 3 entries each pretty much as I recall. Things started to get challenging in excellent and we had some NQs and some ugly scores, but by the time we had earned RAE things were pretty nice and consistent. Then they introduced Master and later the RACh. We have had a wonderful experience doing it and if you saw my recent pics from our first COVID era trials you can see that she doesn't give a hoot about the mask wearing and at 12 years old is still spry and having fun. I think you will really enjoy rally as it is true a team and bond building activity.
 
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