Poodle Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Cleo is a standard nearing 9 months old. We did puppy kindergarten, 1st grade, and about to finish 2nd grade. The latter included a lot of more challenging focus work while being near distractions (other dogs). We are also almost finished with a second session of agility class. That class has a very small training ring, so everyone is close together, and the biggest challenge for Cleo is distraction--she wants to meet everyone, although she does very well in the larger ring where the other classes take place. Cleo is a very friendly girl, but she is usually good at focusing on me when she has a job. We will probably do another round of agility. She is still a little hesitant about the bridge--she'll go in one direction but not the other. Otherwise, she enjoys all of the elements.

Our options for what comes next: CGC class, beginning nose work, or Rally-O. I definitely want to take CGC with her, though i don't she'll pass the first time. I'm wondering about nose work. That's very different from anything i've tried with her, and I think it could be fun.

I'd love input from anyone with experience as to what makes sense for this age and with this temperament.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,254 Posts
I would definitely take the CGC class next. In my club that focuses on competition obedience, you don't get to take the rally class until you have finished the CGC class as well as an Advanced Basic Skills class after you earn your CGC. The Advanced Basic Skills class is where you learn competition style fronts, finishes and heads up heeling etc. the basics that you need as you learn the rally signs. The Advanced Basic Skills class also leads into the Beginner Novice/Novice Obedience class. Different training facilities may have a different sequence of handling this, but it's extremely helpful to have the CGC skills under your belt before heading into rally.

You can do nose work at this time too. It's very different - CGC, Rally, and even agility are all about the dog learning to read your body language, signals and voice cues and the dog moves in relationship to you. In nose work you have to learn to read your dog's body language etc. and you step away (either on a very long leash or off leash) and let your dog work independantly. Most dogs love nose work - it's the rare dog sport where they get treats in competition when they find the hides. I have some friends who are serious competitors who start training their dog from 8 weeks, so age doesn't play a role.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I would definitely take the CGC class next. In my club that focuses on competition obedience, you don't get to take the rally class until you have finished the CGC class as well as an Advanced Basic Skills class after you earn your CGC. The Advanced Basic Skills class is where you learn competition style fronts, finishes and heads up heeling etc. the basics that you need as you learn the rally signs. The Advanced Basic Skills class also leads into the Beginner Novice/Novice Obedience class. Different training facilities may have a different sequence of handling this, but it's extremely helpful to have the CGC skills under your belt before heading into rally.

You can do nose work at this time too. It's very different - CGC, Rally, and even agility are all about the dog learning to read your body language, signals and voice cues and the dog moves in relationship to you. In nose work you have to learn to read your dog's body language etc. and you step away (either on a very long leash or off leash) and let your dog work independantly. Most dogs love nose work - it's the rare dog sport where they get treats in competition when they find the hides. I have some friends who are serious competitors who start training their dog from 8 weeks, so age doesn't play a role.
This is so helpful, thank you! I will definitely do the CGC class. I'm interested in taking Cleo through therapy dog training, and I know the CGC is a prerequisite for that and other things. It may very well be required for Rally at the place I've been going, too (i couldn't tell from the class description). The nose work sounds like fun and might be a nice change from agility. If I can make the schedule work, we might do both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
I agree with Skylar. Agility can be taught separately if there is a foundations/puppy-young dog class available. Serious agility competitors start foundation activities with very young pups, many which can be accomplished at home with no special equipment.

i only started taking obedience classes to improve my dog’s attention in agility. Even though they are in the agility ring alone, there are other dogs around and in adjacent rings and that was proving a distraction.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,156 Posts
I would do CGC. It is a good way to take a measure of what you've accomplished to take the test (even if you didn't pass the first time). Then you can do all of those activities if you want. One is not exclusive of the other. It depends on your time, energy and finances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all! I am keeping a lookout for a good CGC class. (Unfortunately the place near us has one that's late evening, and that is not a good time for us.)
The agility class we take is pretty low-key. Cleo is the only puppy in there, but they keep everything appropriate--no high jumps, etc. It's for skills development and fun but not really for competition prep. We had a big success today, she finally went both ways on the dog walk (I call it a bridge, but I can't remember the official name--it's a long raised plank with ramps sloping down at each end).
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top