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Well Winston is 6 month old Standard. Winston was the second to last puppy to leave his mom. We got him when he was over 12 weeks old.

He is is displaying a few behaviors that are concerning me/family.

Biggest one is that he does not come when called EVER!!! He was never the puppy that would come running happily when he sees's or hears his owner. Its becoming more annoying by the day. I will call him and he just stares at me. This evening hubby was calling him and winston just started barking at him (this was a first) . We where both like what the heck? Sometimes he comes to us but stops right before he reaches within arm length of us.

Winston appears to be kind of "scared of us". When any member of the immediate house family attempts to pet him - he moves back or runs off.

We took winston to a training class for 10 weeks - he barely passed compared to the other dogs. We did the homework etc. I said to myself "poodles are suppose to be so smart, easily trainable etc" well not our dog.

Winston is becoming more aggressive towards other dogs. Still pulls on the leash when taken for a walk etc.

Overall, he is not an easily trainable poodle. I really wonder what WE are doing wrong? I'm gonna call the trainer back and see if we can re-take the training class. My hubby has already suggested re-homing winston. He might not be a good fit for our family with kids and not sure what the dog is gonna do next - personality wise

Any suggestions, any tips - I'm really sad over this
 

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Kala took a long time to be comfortable with us. Now she is a big baby. She wouldn't come to me at first either and was very shy. I think you need to condition him to come to you. Try only calling him when you have a treat for a while and then when he comes give him the treat and lots of praise. Then, keep doing this and eventually take out the treat and keep praising him. It took time for Kala to love us, but it did happen. There were times when I just got so upset because I spent so much time with her and it seemed like she could care less whether i lived or died. She is a wonderful dog now at 11 month old, but it was a pretty slow process. Her first puppy class I could not pass because I could not get her to go down. Months later, after getting some great advice from the forum, she now has her AKC star puppy and will be going for her CGC soon. I am not familiar with the aggressive behaviors so I will let others give their advice on that.

Edited to add: looking back at your post again reminds me so much of Kala's attitude for her first several months. She was the runt and the last puppy left in the litter. She didn't run to you like all the other puppies either but she is a completely different dog now. Almost the opposite-jumps up a bit too much:)

Another thing, you may not do this but i did-dont' get angry with them because they can sense it and it doesn't do the situation any good. I would give him some more time to adjust and just don't pressure him into joining the family but don't let him get away with anything and everything either. Good luck! If you need some moral support from someone that's been there, I'm here for you:)
 

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A reliable recall requires consistent, persistent training, and time. He's still very young at 6 months old. What, exactly, have you done in terms of training on recall?

Without actually observing Winston with you, it's not possible for anyone to determine what's going on. You mention he seems scared of you, so perhaps it's your body language, and/or your frustration with him because he's not doing what you think he should be doing. If you've scolded him after calling him to you, for example, that teaches him it's not a good idea to come when called. Or, called him to you to do something with/to him that he doesn't like (plucking ears, etc.).

That Winston "barely passed compared to the other dogs" in your training class doesn't mean he's not trainable. If my dogs (and those I foster) aren't "getting it," the first thing I check is my method of teaching the dog whatever it is that I'm trying to train. If what I'm doing isn't working, then the dog doesn't understand what it is I want. I work on better communication with that dog. And, training should be fun, for the dog AND for you. Emotions not only travel down the leash, they fly across the room! So, if you're tired or impatient, that's not the time to train. Wait until you're in the right mindset. A 10-wk training class is just the beginning. Training has to continue on a daily basis. If he's still pulliing on leash, then you haven't succeeding in communicating what you want/expect, or, you aren't being consistent in your training sessions (let him get away with it sometimes, because you're pressed for time or something).

How often do you work on loose-leash walking?

What do you mean when you say Winston is getting aggressive towards other dogs? On leash? What does he do? What kind of on-going socialization do you provide him? How much exercise does he get? What kind of exercise does he get?

You might want to have a behaviorist come to your home for an evaluation. S/he will be able to observe what kind of relationship you've estblished with Winston, and what triggers are causing the unwanted behaviors.








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You should never give a command that you can not

Treat or Enforce!

Winston needs to be on a leash anytime he is out of his crate. He can drag the leash around the house, but ideally he should be tethered to you. Tie the leash to your belt and go about your merry way. The dog will learn to follow you. It will also allow you to handle him so that he can not shy away from interactions.

To get a reliable recall, give the recall command in a happy upbeat voice: "Winston, Come!" Take a couple of steps back backwards. If he comes, PRAISE PRAISE PRAISE! If he doesn't come right away, collar pop him and reel him in, giving him a treat in front of you or even around back, between your legs to encourage him to come close and straight up to you. PRAISE PRAISE PRAISE as he comes in.

It sure sounds like you all need to work on attention. When you say, "Watch!" or "Ready!" does he look you in the face? This needs to be taught. If Winston is paying attention to you, he won't have time to bother with other dogs.

Pulling on leash? Have you tried a pinch collar?
 

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I am with Kala, this sounds similar to Olie - although he was not afraid of us BUT when we did try to pet him he would hunch down and run - but it was more of a playfully chase me thing, not fear.

Olie is 9 months now and is finally starting to come much better. This is the hardest command and IMO one of that last to get down. My Poms will be 2 and they come quickly now but it took a while with them as well. Unless you are doing the leash and command/obedience training daily they will be a bit slower to achieve the results needed.

We find with Olie that we still have to do home training with him several times a week for at least 10-15 minutes and than once in the house we will call Olie on and off through out the night if we are in another room to keep practicing "Come" .

Also with Suri who just turned 2 in March. We still do training exercises with her on sitting - I know an easy one right? NO - what I have determined is she is/was a gassy dog - and anytime we put her in sit, she let one, and I think that made her hesitant on sitting. Luckily her gas has improved and the irony is her sit has improved. Sometimes there are little reasons why they might hesitate - if you can figure this out, it should get easier.
 

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You should never give a command that you can not

Treat or Enforce!

Winston needs to be on a leash anytime he is out of his crate.
!00% right! I was having the exact problem with Fly. She would never come when called and if she did it would be just within arm's reach and then bounce off. It was always done in play, as she would do the play bow as she trompled off. I kept her on a lead for a week straight anytime she was out of her kennel. This made all the world of difference. Problem solved for me. I would give this a definite try.

Good Luck and don't give up!!!
 

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They do seem to go through certain phases at certain ages. 6 months is about the time they start trying to see how much they can get away with. They will sometimes act like they don't know what you're talking about when you give them a command they used to obey without hesitation.

This is the time to step up and assert your leadership. Cbrand's advice is best and it really works.

As for running away from you when you try to pet him, it might not be that he is afraid of you--it might be that he's trying to get you to chase him. When Teddy has done that, it's been more of a playful thing than a fearful one.

Try not to let your frustration get the better of you (and that should go for the entire family). Training a dog takes more patience than you think you have, but hang in there because it does take time.

Good luck. I would hate to see you have to give up your baby.
 

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I managed a humane society for 4 years and I can honestly say that a large percentage of dogs we'd get in were adolescent puppies whose owners just couldn't or wouldn't put the time into them that they needed. Baby puppies are cute, well behaved adults are worth their weight in gold, the in-between stage... not so cute or valuable (to some people).

Everyone has given wonderful advice for you to try. Those wonderful well behaved adult dogs don't just "happen"... They're molded and developed by their owner's actions. Having a (good) dog takes some time and some work... don't give up on him now!

GOOD LUCK!!
 

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Another thing I thought I would mention...what you are perceiving as aggression toward other dogs may not be aggression at all. The Dog Whisperer has dealt with a lot of dogs where this is the case. They just need to be properly socialized and introduced to other dogs in such a way that neither perceives the other as a threat. Young male dogs seem to do a lot of posturing, especially between the time they start producing testosterone and when they are neutered. It isn't aggression, it's the dog attempting to find his place in the pecking order of the world. This is why he needs someone from his own pack to follow (you and the other humans in your household. And your cat, if you have one) ;)

What have you done with him as far as socializing him with other dogs?
 

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Does Winston have a lot of freedom? Can he go where he wants and do what he wants? I ask this because it seems that he isn't looking to you for all the "good things" in life.

Jager is just about Winston's age, and from the time we brought him home, he was on a leash when he wasn't in his crate or pen. Even in the backyard, I didn't let him free roam until he had been with us a few weeks, and once he was allowed to roam, if he got into trouble (starting digging up the plants, chewing on the wood post that holds up our awning, etc.), he "lost" his freedom and the leash went back on.

Same in the house, now that he's a little older, he is allowed off the leash in the living room if I am sitting right there with him, but if he tries to wander off and doesn't listen when I call him back, the leash goes back on. When I'm in the kitchen making dinner, he's with me (on a leash tethered a few feet from me).

My point is, to the dog, I am in charge. I am the leader. All good things (praise, play, food, toys, walks, time off the leash) come from me. Jager has a naughty, mischevious streak and I think if I had not been so stuctured with him, he would be behaving very differently right now. Even with all this structure, he is a pill sometimes--he tries testing me.

What is the structure like in your home?

Also, in terms of the training, I have found that Jager takes a while to figure out what I'm asking him to do. Once he figures it out, it's like a light go on in his eyes (OH! That's what you want!). But getting there takes some time, and he gets bored and distracted, so I try to keep his training sessions short and frequent. He sits for his food bowl, he sits or lies down if he wants me to throw his toy, we practice wait, sit, down, stay on our walks.

For the coming when called, Jager responds much better to me than my husband. I will say "come!" in a high, happy, fun voice and he runs right over. My husband tries to be all serious about it and says "COME!" in a low, not very fun voice. Jager doesn't usually respond to that (and my husband is working on finding his happy voice). We will play the come game with treats where we take turns back and forth with "come!" and give him a treat, then the other person immediately says "come" and gives a treat. Jager loves that game!

Please don't give up on Winston. He is an adolescent and this came be one of the most challenging times. But if you stick with it and work with him, you will come out on the other side.
 

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My pups drag a leash a lot. I hate teaching recall. I have never had a problem with any other command, but recall is the stitch in my side when it comes to training. Mine drag a 20' line in the yard. I got enough light weight line for 2 pups and 2 clips for $6 @ Lowe's. One for my pup, and one for my sisters. Works great for outside. I make shorter ones for inside and cut some off they more my pups progress.

Good luck!!!
 

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time to tie the lil bugger to you and let him know how much being near you COUNTS.

NILF- nothing in life is free- every treat pet snuggle should be a reward for something A sit a down a look at me- what ever.

Recalls- play the monkey in the middle game- recalling back and forth (Start at just 2-3 feet apart) between you and your husband GREAT treats each time. CLicker train it to make it even better.

HE might just be a very independant sort- which means it's VERY important to get that recall consistant and always worked on for when he gets older.
 

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I agree sounds like he's independent and testing boundaries right now. All kids go through this and dogs too. I think everyone has given excellent advice. Hope you find some benefits by trying some of the things here.
 

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i have some similar issues with my timid standard. she isn't scared of me or my husband or our house guests in general. however, she hates being pet by people other than myself and my husband and will shy away when their hand comes near the top of her head.

we work on handling exercises when guests come over. i ask our friends to treat her as they hold their hand over her head and will treat her each time their hand comes closer and closer to petting her. not that i want strangers to ever pet her (they should always ask politely beforehand), but she shouldn't shy away should the opportunity present itself!

she's still not completely used to being pet by strangers, however, each time we do the handling exercises i'm hoping she'll get better.

On the aggression with other dogs, Mochi sometimes does that too. She's not being aggressive when she barks loudly at other dogs. Instead she's actually trying to get them to play with her (in a really rude way if you ask me!). Still working on it with her...she's still a pup.
 

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This is a great thread! It's nice to be reminded of all the things I should be doing! lol
Rogan's perfect in recall during our obedience classes (with treats and on leash) but if he manages to get out of backyard (he's found a way to escape the little monkey) it's a different story! He's a brat! ... he plays the catch me if you can game and it drives me nuts!! I need to work a lot more on recall so that he knows it means! All the tips here will be re-implemented immediately!
 

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This is a great thread! It's nice to be reminded of all the things I should be doing! lol
Rogan's perfect in recall during our obedience classes (with treats and on leash) but if he manages to get out of backyard (he's found a way to escape the little monkey) it's a different story! He's a brat! ... he plays the catch me if you can game and it drives me nuts!! I need to work a lot more on recall so that he knows it means! All the tips here will be re-implemented immediately!
That is Pearl, exactly. And Alf was the second to last puppy, who often doesn't want to come & is timid still- not the alpha pup. I am just working him alone a lot (must remember to let him drag a leash, but he's a chewer- a cable is a better idea), use structured crate time, & am VERY patient on walks (he does that better with the other dogs).

I find if I inadvertantly frighten him or am harsh in my tone, he is frightened out of (what seems to me) proportion, he shuts down; so I have to win his trust. (Reading that- what is it? Vollhard puppy scale?) at linked at VIP, seemed to help me in understanding a dog- a baby- of his temperment; I am reinforcing pack behavior with gentle praise from his level, petting, & treats (yes, NILF, lol.)

Hope I am doing him well. The older dogs seem to give him confidence, but other dogs scare him still too.

PS Re: Pulling- Pearl was a bad one, & I have arthritis in my shoulder, so I got a good comfortable head collar, & it has been amazing- going for long walks is a pleasure now (aside from my bad knees ;)). She doesn't pull regularly on a normal collar/leash now that she has had the headcollar experience, but if she sees something interesting, watch out- so I still use it most of the time.
 
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