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Our Toy is 20 months old. We got him at 8 weeks and he was apricot. About 6 months in, he started turning white and eventually did so, aside from a bit of his ears.
He's always had a couple random dark hairs on his back near the tail, but recently we've noticed he has rust colored hairs running from neck to tail. They've sprouted faster and are longer than the rest of his hair, and feel to me like they're more coarse.

Is this normal? Or am I about to end up with a wirehair Toy? LOL

Here's a pic.
 

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Hi,

I'm far from expert on this, but your boy is probably what's considered a Cream. What you're describing is normal in my experience. My Remo went from looking like an apricot at 8 weeks to a nearly solid cream, now at 2y 8m. His wiry hairs are still orangey tho, at least til I clipped him down again last week.

Poodle color genetics are pretty interesting. What color/s are his parents?

Remo 8w and a few days
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Remo at 2y 8m, taken Christmas day
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His brother Neo was black but may be fading to blue. Their mom was the same color as Remo about 6 months ago. Their dad was silver.
463421
 

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Thanks for the reply!

Buddy looked very similar to yours in the beginning. First pic is 4-6 months old I would guess. Second is in August, so about 16 months old. That one is fresh from the groomer but his ears and top of head now have started to look apricot again. The color changes are weird.

My wife may know, but I have no idea about the parents' colors. I do know one brother was/is black.
 

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Your pup is cute and those are just guard hairs.
Thanks! I'd never heard of guard hairs before but I guess I've seen them. That's pretty much all he has though. I'm not quite sure when they sprouted but it made me wonder if prednisone has had anything to do with it. He's been on it about a week after an allergic reaction or dry skin caused terrible itching to the point that he was biting off his fur down to the skin.

Our groomer for some reason thinks it necessary to cut his fur down almost completely when there's any matting. It drives us nuts, and I think this last time they did it in November the cold weather hit and dried him out, or maybe his skin was exposed when we switched fabric softeners. That's three times they've done that to him without telling us, so I think we're moving on. That dog gets more pets and rubs than any dog on the planet. If he had any serious matting we would know it, and even if we've missed it, I would be more than OK with them just cutting it out
 

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Gentle word of advice: Stop using that fabric softener and throughly audit all fragranced products you're currently using in your home. These products can torture our dogs, and then we stress their bodies even more by treating the symptoms without removing the triggers.

I'm currently trying to figure out the source of Peggy's allergies, and it's tedious. So I get it. I read that under 1 year of age, allergies are less likely to be environmental, so in her case I'm focusing on diet.
 

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YES, unscented and natural products in the household only, please, for your and your dogs' sake!

Robin, I thought it was the opposite--under one year it's more likely to be environmental rather than food allergies. But I don't know. Allergies are frustrating.


Gentle word of advice: Stop using that fabric softener and throughly audit all fragranced products you're currently using in your home. These products can torture our dogs, and then we stress their bodies even more by treating the symptoms without removing the triggers.

I'm currently trying to figure out the source of Peggy's allergies, and it's tedious. So I get it. I read that under 1 year of age, allergies are less likely to be environmental, so in her case I'm focusing on diet.
 

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YES, unscented and natural products in the household only, please, for your and your dogs' sake!

Robin, I thought it was the opposite--under one year it's more likely to be environmental rather than food allergies. But I don't know. Allergies are frustrating.
Oops. The source I used actually said under 6 months it's more likely food-related, and Peggy started showing symptoms well before 6 months. They also flared up again after we were gifted a variety of Christmas treats for her. I should've known better than to try more than one new one at a time.

Back to the drawing board!
 

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Thanks! I'd never heard of guard hairs before but I guess I've seen them. That's pretty much all he has though. I'm not quite sure when they sprouted but it made me wonder if prednisone has had anything to do with it. He's been on it about a week after an allergic reaction or dry skin caused terrible itching to the point that he was biting off his fur down to the skin.

Our groomer for some reason thinks it necessary to cut his fur down almost completely when there's any matting. It drives us nuts, and I think this last time they did it in November the cold weather hit and dried him out, or maybe his skin was exposed when we switched fabric softeners. That's three times they've done that to him without telling us, so I think we're moving on. That dog gets more pets and rubs than any dog on the planet. If he had any serious matting we would know it, and even if we've missed it, I would be more than OK with them just cutting it out
My Remo developed the guard hairs without any prednisone, fyi.

How often do you brush or comb Buddy and what kind (not brand) do you use? It sounds like his fur is similar to Remo's in texture also. I call Remo's "cotton candy" because it's fine and soft (not the ideal for a poodle coat) and sticks to itself just like cotton candy (fortunately not to anything else). I have to use a pin brush and steel comb on him daily or the tiny mats get ahead of me so very quickly. I don't feel them until the brush or comb catches on them.

That's good advice about the unscented products. Was that a first time for that type of reaction?
 

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I no longer use any fabric softeners, even for my own clothing. Try using 1/2 to 1 cup of white vinegar in your last rinse in the washer. And no dryer sheets.

Also, I no longer allow anyone to give my dog treats unless they contain only one or two ingredients.

We all also only drink water straight from a safe spring, or filtered water. If I put spring water in one bowl, and city drinking water with whatever they add to it in another bowl, my dog will choose the spring water 100% of the time.
 

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I no longer use any fabric softeners, even for my own clothing. Try using 1/2 to 1 cup of white vinegar in your last rinse in the washer. And no dryer sheets.

Also, I no longer allow anyone to give my dog treats unless they contain only one or two ingredients.

We all also only drink water straight from a safe spring, or filtered water. If I put spring water in one bowl, and city drinking water with whatever they add to it in another bowl, my dog will choose the spring water 100% of the time.
I'm with you. I used to spend so much money on "healthy" treats. Now I realize the healthiest (and cheapest) treats are actually just whole foods cut into tiny pieces or dried into jerky.

I felt bad because family members shopped so sweetly for Peggy's Christmas treats, and they chose relatively well. But seeing her allergies flare right back up again was a hard but effective lesson. How could I ever pinpoint the culprit(s) in those lengthy ingredient lists? Especially with vague items like "natural flavours" on there.
 

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It was difficult, but when I finally just returned the expensive treats to the 'givers' and explained, then they never did it again. I felt guilty at first, but now they even give their own animals more healthy treats! Don't sacrifice your dogs health, or your own, when you can use it for an educable moment.

Finally at the age of 73 I am able to stick up for my Spoo, and myself. Why on earth did it take me so long?
 

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kontiki, your story reminds about my years of therapy visits at nursing homes.Part of the therapy group rules were that your dog was not supposed to eat anything while they were working. Well, in theory that is great, but it is difficult to deny a 95 year old woman the privilege of giving your dog a bite of her sandwich. I used to tell the clients that my girl had bad allergies and could not eat people food. I finally broke down though, when one man saw us coming and called us to his room where he had stashed cookies just for the ol' girl. I started to say "no" when he explained that theses cookies were not the junk baked at the nursing home... these were homemade by his wife, and he added, "Only the best for my little girl!" Yeah, I broke the rules that day.
 

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It was difficult, but when I finally just returned the expensive treats to the 'givers' and explained, then they never did it again. I felt guilty at first, but now they even give their own animals more healthy treats! Don't sacrifice your dogs health, or your own, when you can use it for an educable moment.

Finally at the age of 73 I am able to stick up for my Spoo, and myself. Why on earth did it take me so long?
Thank you for this much-needed encouragement :)

My husband had to ask a stranger the other day to stop riling Peggy up. He wanted her to jump on him and bite his hands, which is exactly what we're trying to teach her not to do. Apparently he didn't take my husband's polite request very well, but we're both working hard these days to advocate as necessary for ourselves and Peggy. It's a journey. Definitely a resolution for 2020.
 

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kontiki, your story reminds about my years of therapy visits at nursing homes.Part of the therapy group rules were that your dog was not supposed to eat anything while they were working. Well, in theory that is great, but it is difficult to deny a 95 year old woman the privilege of giving your dog a bite of her sandwich. I used to tell the clients that my girl had bad allergies and could not eat people food. I finally broke down though, when one man saw us coming and called us to his room where he had stashed cookies just for the ol' girl. I started to say "no" when he explained that theses cookies were not the junk baked at the nursing home... these were homemade by his wife, and he added, "Only the best for my little girl!" Yeah, I broke the rules that day.
Ohhhhhhh ??????
 

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Sweet story, but I would ask about the ingredients anyway. If it was only either meat, vegetables, or fruit, OK. Otherwise no. If visiting a nursing home I carry things that ok for him. If someone wants to feed him, I provide the treat, and then the person needs to ask him to sit, and then can give the treat.

No one is allowed to give my beloved Spoo something unhealthy. !!
 

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Gentle word of advice: Stop using that fabric softener and throughly audit all fragranced products you're currently using in your home. These products can torture our dogs, and then we stress their bodies even more by treating the symptoms without removing the triggers.

I'm currently trying to figure out the source of Peggy's allergies, and it's tedious. So I get it. I read that under 1 year of age, allergies are less likely to be environmental, so in her case I'm focusing on diet.
Thanks. When we suspected it was the Tide pods (combined with his hair being cut so short) we ditched them and washed everything again with the stuff we've used for 10 years.
 

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My Remo developed the guard hairs without any prednisone, fyi.

How often do you brush or comb Buddy and what kind (not brand) do you use? It sounds like his fur is similar to Remo's in texture also. I call Remo's "cotton candy" because it's fine and soft (not the ideal for a poodle coat) and sticks to itself just like cotton candy (fortunately not to anything else). I have to use a pin brush and steel comb on him daily or the tiny mats get ahead of me so very quickly. I don't feel them until the brush or comb catches on them.

That's good advice about the unscented products. Was that a first time for that type of reaction?
He gets some sort of brushing most days. We either use a silicon bristle glove or one of the brushes with a small head and the tiny metal spikes. that one does a good job of passing through his hair without snagging while still separating it thoroughly. He also doesn't hate that one..lol. I usually bathe him once a week with Buddy Wash. I'm probably gonna back that off to two weeks as long as he doesn't get super stinky. Unlike most of the dogs in our neighborhood, he goes for a lot of walks. Most days he gets in close to a mile, total, and plays with cats or one of the other dogs if they're out, so he gets into smelly stuff here and there.

I think you might be right about his hair. He's really soft and the it's the first thing people notice when they pet him. Among a hundred other nicknames, my wife calls him "My Fuzzy."
 

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He gets some sort of brushing most days. We either use a silicon bristle glove or one of the brushes with a small head and the tiny metal spikes. that one does a good job of passing through his hair without snagging while still separating it thoroughly. He also doesn't hate that one..lol. I usually bathe him once a week with Buddy Wash. I'm probably gonna back that off to two weeks as long as he doesn't get super stinky. Unlike most of the dogs in our neighborhood, he goes for a lot of walks. Most days he gets in close to a mile, total, and plays with cats or one of the other dogs if they're out, so he gets into smelly stuff here and there.

I think you might be right about his hair. He's really soft and the it's the first thing people notice when they pet him. Among a hundred other nicknames, my wife calls him "My Fuzzy."
You said you used Buddy Wash to shampoo him. I never heard of it. Google took me to Chewy that has several choices all of which have potentially irritating ingredients from mint and lavender to bergamot. His shampoo may be the problem.

Look for a mild pet friendly detergent with no fragrance, smells, aroma perfumes etc. added. In addition rinse thoroughly because detergent left on the skin can be drying and irritating. Same with any conditioner you may apply after shampoo.
 
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