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Unless they changed the rules, CL does not allow anyone to list pets “for sale”, so they are all “rehomed”. I would not give any internet stranger my home address unless we knew each other very well. I also wouldn’t pay very much for a “rehome”, a few hundred at most.
 

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Unless they changed the rules, CL does not allow anyone to list pets “for sale”, so they are all “rehomed”.
I see this on Facebook a lot, too. But even if someone is circumventing the rules with semantics, that doesn’t justify doubling down on a fake story. Not saying that’s the case with the OP’s situation, but it happens alllllllllllll the time. :confused: Must really suck for those who genuinely have to rehome a beloved pet due to unfortunate circumstances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Something that has nibbled at me has finally landed.
If those photos are all truly of her poodles, and if the one sister is the clean face poodle in the photos taken out of the house is actually of one sister, why?
I mean, if there are two, if they're both hers, both living with her, why wouldn't she take all the photos at the same time and in the same place and post those?

Caution caution caution is in order.

If this is legit, I'm very sad for those sisters and whoever the other smaller white/light poodle(?) is. They've been together all their lives and now will be separated.
Not suggesting you take both or even the smaller one but what are her plans for all her dogs, not just the standards?
I tend to zero in on things that don't add up, and there's more it seems as I think on this with the info available.
It is always sad to separate siblings when they have been bonded. I am in no means able to care for more than one standard poodle at this time. It also concerns me as well that the photos provided did not have the two sisters together; she has sent me a video of the two together, https://streamable.com/0vje4p
I have also requested more photos of the poodle with the pink harness. She says that they're up to date on shots, but will need to have new rabies done. And although she claims full rights on AKC -- akc paperwork is not a defining factor to me at the end of the day if the dog needs to be taken. She has quoted me $2,500 for each dog, neither of them have been spayed, and at a breeder premium, I am a bit caught off guard, on whether to pass or to try and get a lower number. I don't see myself paying more than $1000 for a rehome/rescue from CL.
 

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I would not go any further until she provides the name of her veterinarian and breeder as references.

As far as I’m concerned, anyone willing to “rehome” unspayed dogs is not looking out for the well-being of beloved pets. Especially not at that price. This sounds like a sale, pure and simple. If you’re okay with that, then by all means proceed. But I wouldn’t personally do business with someone who’s not being honest with me about their circumstances or the origins of their dogs.
 

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I just watched the video and it’s very strange. They’re behind glass and she’s encouraging them to bark. Just...odd. And why would they need another rabies shot at 18 months?

“In California, the law reads that any dog must receive 3 rabies vaccines in the first 5 years of life. That means 1 is given at 3-4 months of age, then at 1 year and 3-4 months of age and then 3 years later. After this, dogs are then required to be vaccinated every 3 years.”


What’s your gut telling you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I would not go any further until she provides the name of her veterinarian and breeder as references.

As far as I’m concerned, anyone willing to “rehome” unspayed dogs is not looking out for the well-being of beloved pets. Especially not at that price. This sounds like a sale, pure and simple. If you’re okay with that, then by all means proceed. But I wouldn’t personally do business with someone who’s not being honest with me about their circumstances or the origins of their dogs.
I agree with you. I told her that I was uncomfortable with the situation, and lack of information provided (she wouldn't give me the name of her veterinarian nor breeder as references), I offered a counter price; and was immediately replied back that she already found a buyer? So, she really wants that $2500.
Thank you all for your input and for helping me; I have learned so much more than I had before about adopting/buying.
And the search continues...
 

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She has quoted me $2,500 for each dog, neither of them have been spayed, and at a breeder premium, I am a bit caught off guard, on whether to pass or to try and get a lower number. I don't see myself paying more than $1000 for a rehome/rescue from CL.
I would walk away. This doesn’t sound like someone rehoming a dog. It looks like a way to sell puppy mill dogs.

I posted but hadn’t read your last post. I think you dodged a bullet. You asked too many legitimate questions which is why they decided to tell you the dogs were sold. Maybe true or maybe not but anyone who was rehoming a loved dog would be thrilled to tell you their vet and where the dogs came from.
 

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yikes. No, I would not pay that for a dog off of Craigslist. You can have a dog with full health testing and a champion lineage for that amount. I’d be curious if this same person pops up as “moving out of the country” again in 6 or 12 months.
 

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As the bits of info dribble out from her, I lean more and more to byb or broker. Her last response sort of sealed that and the video backs up my initial thought that that bare room is an indoor kennel.

I'm adding my personal criteria for selecting a breeder for you.

Some tips, some things to consider and some things to avoid when selecting a quality breeder.

We often hear from folks that they just want a pet. What doesn't seem to be common knowledge is that the kind of quality, conscientious breeders many of us prefer to support are always breeding for the very best poodles they can. It isn't pet puppy vs show puppy, it's lucky us, the ones wanting a pet who get the pups that have some small "fault" that might reduce their chances of winning competitions, but are flawless to us :).

It's not unusual to think that there are possibly thousands of breeders to choose from. For quality, conscientious breeders, that number is more likely only in the hundreds in the US or Canada. A bottom line difference is between those who're breeding primarily for profit and those who're breeding because they feel not only love for poodles but an obligation to the entire breed.

About reviews, a happy owner doesn't necessarily mean an informed owner. It's as likely they've just been lucky, so far. Review any negative comments carefully, if they're allowed to appear.

Getting a puppy from a quality, conscientious breeder is something like insurance. Their investment in the health, welfare, and soundness of all the dogs in their care including the puppies they offer to new homes is part of the reason you're not likely to find a less than $2000 USD puppy from them.

The saying is "pay the breeder or pay the vet". Price alone isn't the only thing to separate quality breeders from those less than. We've seen members quote as high, and even much higher pricing for pups from parents not health tested, not proven to meet breed standards, sold as purebred when only a DNA test could determine that since they may be sold without registration papers.

If I knew the risks and have dedicated poodle health savings of several thousand dollars or pet insurance, knew that basically that the breeder and I would part ways as soon as the pup was in my hands because they're very unlikely to stand behind their pup and me thru the pups life, I might proceed with a breeder that doesn't meet my criteria.

But

I also wouldn't pay quality breeder prices, and over, unless I'm getting all the quality breeder perks.



Health testing of the breeding parents is a good indicator of a quality, conscientious breeder. The Breeder List has info on what to look for in the testing for each variety. Mentioning health testing on a site is nice but isn't proof. For proof, look for health testing results spelled out on the breeder's site, then verify for yourself by going to the site the results are published on. If you don't find any evidence of testing or can't find the info but the breeder appeals to you, contact them and ask where you might see the testing they do. Reputable breeders put in a lot of effort to make sure they're breeding the healthiest poodles and will be happy to talk about it and provide the info.

Look for and verify OFA/CHIC level testing at a minimum. There are also poodle specific DNA panels for those testable conditions. Those are companion testing with the OFA/CHIC testing.
Look Up A Dog | Orthopedic Foundation for Animals | Columbia, MO (ofa.org)


A caution that a health "guarantee" on a puppy doesn't have much to back it if the sire and dam were not given the testing for breed and variety. "Guarantees" without the testing often favor the breeder, more than the buyer.

Read thru any contracts that may be listed. If they rule out coverage for conditions that the breeding pair should or could have been tested for, consider that a caution flag. Otherwise, are the terms clear to you and can you live with them?

Conscientious breeders have a waitlist at the best of times and with pandemic puppy seekers, that wait is stretched well into 2021-2022. There have been more than a few serendipitous contacts between seeker and breeder, so don't be put off by the thought of a waitlist. Also, don't be put off if online sites aren't particularly updated. As often as not, breeders may prefer communicating by phone as well as email or text, and are busy with their dogs rather than keep a website updated.

When you start making contacts, let them know if you're open to an older pup or young adult.

Color preferences are understandable but keep in mind that you're limiting your options even further in a very limited supply of puppies. That beautiful color you fell for may not look the same in a few weeks, or months, or years.

Temperament and personality are lifelong traits.

Be prepared to spend in the range of $2000 to $3500 USD. Conscientious breeders are not padding pricing due to Covid.

Be prepared to travel outside your preferred area.

As a very general rule, websites to be leery of are those that feature cutesy puppies with bows and such, little or no useful info on sires or dams, the word "Order" or "Ordering" (these are living beings, not appliances) and a PayPal or "pay here" button prominently featured "for your convenience".


An excellent source for breeder referrals is your local or the regional or national Poodle Club. An online search for "Poodle Club of ___ (your city or state)" will find them. You can also go directly to the national club site.

Some Poodle Club links are in the Breeder List.


As a sort of checklist of things to look for or ask, this is my personal criteria (I have another more detailed but just this for now):

My criteria need not be yours but I think it's important for a potential poodle owner to understand why these things matter in finding a conscientious breeder and to get a well bred puppy to share life with for many years to come.
Simply being advertised as "registered" or even "purebred" doesn't mean that a puppy is well bred.


Every one of these is a talking point a conscientious breeder will welcome, just not all at the same time :)

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed.
They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better.
They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own.
They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract.
They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them.
They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety and do the health testing of their breeding dogs.
They prove their dogs meet breed standards and are physically capable by breeding from sires and dams proven in competition or participating in other activities.
They do not cross breed.
They will have as many questions for me as I do for them.
They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.


🐩 Breeders Listed by Location 🐩 Plus Additional Resources 🐩
GEOGRAPHICAL BREEDERS LIST AND ADDITIONAL RESOURCES PLEASE READ THIS FIRST What this list is NOT: This list is not an endorsement of any breeder by Poodle Forum This list is not a list to just go buy from without doing more investigation This list is not comprehensive What this list IS: This...

Definitely contact the Poodle Club of your area and don't pass by the multi-listings. Some will be duplicated individually in the state listing, but not all are.
 

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although she claims full rights on AKC -- akc paperwork is not a defining factor to me
AKC registration is nothing more than their word that any puppy or dog is purebred. That's why you should want that paperwork even if you never register your own pup. It's not a question of whether you want to breed or show the dog. It's proof that your dog is what they say it is. (There are caveats of course, cheaters and such, but having the paperwork gives you leverage on them.)

AKC full registration means that the dog can be bred and resulting pups will qualify for AKC registry due to provability. The catch here is that virtually no quality, conscientious breeder will sell a full rights registration to just anyone strictly for the price of admission. A quality breeder has worked hard to make beautiful dogs and a good reputation. They are not going to hand that off to someone unless there is a very different agreement (contract) that allows them some control in the future of that dog and their pups.
 

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I read somewhere on here I think saying that the highest pet fee you can charge for adoption is $500, I am just curious. If she provides me with all of the paper, and gives a good registry number, and then says "It's going to be $1,000-$1,200", is that a reasonable price range for rehoming?
I haven't seen anything about a limit officially set anywhere but there is a general feeling that a true rehome of a beloved pet will not be comparable to the original purchase price, nor to recoup whatever they have spent on the dog.

It would be high enough to try to ensure that the dog won't just get used by the buyer as, or flipped to, a mill, byb, research, etc., and to possibly feel that the new family can afford to keep the dog in good health and have a happy home.

If she'd gotten the dog from a quality breeder with a "return to breeder" clause, there would rarely be any reimbursement. If a current owner isn't under obligation to a breeder or is ignoring that obligation, and is asking much more than $500, I'd seriously question their reason for owning the dog and motives for selling/"rehoming".

Now, if "she provides me with all of the paper, and gives a good registry number, and then says "It's going to be $1,000-$1,200" ", only you can decide if it's worth it to you.

That's definitely a very good price for a dog from health tested parents (see posts above), who have been titled in competition and are therefore properly registered with a reputable purebred registry, healthy and UTD on required vaccinations with vet info and records provided and the original breeder is in the loop.

If there was a contract and the seller ignored it and the breeder learns of it, you could end up in a bit of a pickle.
 
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To be honest I'm not sure which dog she will be giving me, she says she is offering two, and I am only interested in owning one currently. I was trying to distinguish the faces in the dogs to tell them apart, I am guessing the shaved face dog is one, and puppy cut dog is another.
oh so this person has 3 dogs? I thought the black shaved face was the dog when it was younger and better cared for, and the teddy bear face is now. Im a little scared that this dog is stolen considering how different it looks now.

Edit: oh I see the tail now. Yeah somethings wrong here, too many poodles, asking too much. Also you don’t need to get rid of your dogs to when you leave the country.
 
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