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This is the first part of 3. Very interesting. I personally love hearing the coyotes that live behind me and respect them for their adaptability and place in the ecosystem. They are good for keeping the rodent population down, which because of the farm land around me can be annoying. One must be very careful when you have small dogs especially. But even some bigger dogs if they're not aggressive enough. My Lab would run coyotes off my acreage no problemo. But these little poodles wouldn't stand a chance so I go out with them when they are in the back yard even though it's fenced. That's no problemo for the coyotes. Enjoy.

 

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Thank you so much for sharing this. Some of this is common knowledge because of things we learn by watching the news, or have a coyote in our neighborhood, but much if it was eye opening.

I believed most coyotes are dog aggressive no matter the size. But it was really interesting to see the coyote approach a big dog, nip him in the leg, then turn and run when the dog turned around to face him.

What was even more interesting to me was seeing one walk along the sidewalk amidst a lot of people. I sure do feel a lot more comfortable about them now.

We seem to have a rise in our coyote population judging from the newscasts about them becoming more and more frequent. Most people leave them alone, but I do know they trap them and relocate them when small pets start disappearing, along with forceful and earnest warnings to keeps pets inside unless you can be with them.

We, my HOA, believe we may have one near us as many of our feral cats have disappeared. Those who feed them notice a loss, sometimes everyday.

This is a great video... very much common sense and informative about how urban and rural coyotes differ from each other. I tend to believe the urban ones have learned to be less frightened of people. It just makes sense to me.


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Oh definitely the urban ones are less concerned about humans, which makes it more dangerous. When I had acreage in this state (WA) and in Idaho, you should have seen how skittish they were. I'd see some way away from my house, in the pasture and I'd touch the door knob, barely turn it, they'd hear and they'd run or trot fast into the cover of the trees. That's the same thing with all wild animals, including bears. They'll get habituated to humans and come in close when there are plenty of humans and food available, lose their fear and become dangerous. But out more in the wilderness, much more spooked by humans. And they tend to be afraid of domestic dogs from what I've observed. (domestic dogs = humans and I think they know it) My larger dogs ran coyotes off my property more than once. And my male Chihuahua ran a black bear off my property in Idaho one time, then a 2nd time with my Dobe. The two of them roaring after a young black bear. That scared me to death. And I was yelling at them to come back, which they did and which made the bear run even faster. If he had turned and swiped at either of the dogs, that would have been curtains for the Chi for sure. I think it was about a yearling or a little older. But a rather smallish bear. All I saw was his bum high tailing it up the bank and into the woods.

Yes, that documentary is a lot of common knowledge but I thought it was good to dispel some of those myths that many people may still think are the way it is.
 
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That is so funny, (and I’m sure it was super scary), about the chi running the bear off. It’s so amazing how the littlest dogs think they are the size of an elephant lol. And I did like her going through myths and truths. There were a couple that really surprised me, but I am grateful for the knowledge. Sometimes in the fall
And winter I like to get out at night with the dogs and go for short distance walks. But because I have mobility issues, doubt I’ll be doing that this year since the cat population is dwindling. Especially would not get tiny Oscar in the line of sight of a coyote.


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Oh it is scary at night, although coyotes are out any time. Just a few months ago, I heard that there was someone walking their little dog near the marina and a coyote came out of the brush and grabbed him even while on a leash! I don't know if the owner was able to pull his little dog back or if the dog died...didn't hear the whole story. But that's how bold they can get when living with humans so close. Very scary. So I don't blame you for not wanting to take little Oscar out at night. I don't take mine out at night...I know that once in a while something can happen in the day too but at night, you can't see what's going on. In the day, if I saw a coyote, I'd pick up my dogs and go back home. But so far, I haven't seen any that bold. I've seen a lone one trotting across the big alfalfa field behind me but he's not that close...he was on his way to a farmer's that has chickens.
 
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Just wondering where you found this video. Will you be watching for the next part to come out, since it’s part 1 of 3 and posting it? I would sure be interested in it!

And I wanted to say, I think you are very smart about not taking your dogs out at night. At least during the day you can see what’s around you. Not so much at night!
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We have just recently started to have to deal with coyotes on Long Island. They have bred on the outskirts of LaGuardia Airport and have been seen in many different towns. They are apparently dispersing themselves by using Long Island Railroad right of ways to travel. If I hear of them near my neighborhood I will be adding rollers along the top of my fence.
 
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Just wondering where you found this video. Will you be watching for the next part to come out, since it’s part 1 of 3 and posting it? I would sure be interested in it!

And I wanted to say, I think you are very smart about not taking your dogs out at night. At least during the day you can see what’s around you. Not so much at night!
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I looked for it and don't see it so maybe it has yet to be posted. If I see it, I sure will post it here.

I really love coyotes and love hearing them at night...almost every night. And enjoy seeing them (from a distance) lol. But I sure wouldn't like it if they got my poodles.


Catherine...I think those rollers are a great idea. But I don't think totally fool proof. But I still think they'd be a great deterrent and help. It reminds me of when I use to have toddlers (and puppies)lol and I'd baby proof the house in all kinds of ways. They could still get into something and I knew that I still had to supervise but could be a little less anxious about it since those things helped a good deal. https://coloradocoyoterollers.com/blogs/coyote-roller-news/let-me-tell-you-about-coyote-rollers-failing
 
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Very interesting! I wonder where our coyotes went. I used to see them or hear them often, but in recent years the government has been killing all the wolves up here (and the moose, via issuing more limited entry hunting permits and destroying moose browse, to discourage wolf populations) so I wonder if the coyotes got the heck out because of that?

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What a shame. Why do humans have to interfere so much? If the wolf population was out of control...before the humans started killing them all off, they probably (the wolves) killed the coyotes.
 
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Off topic here, but we started getting a lot of bears showing up in neighborhoods, swimming pools, ( they want to keep cool too!), screened in porches, etc. The state’s answer was to have a hunting season on bears. The first year only 300 were allowed to be killed in the entire state. But I think they dropped that limit. They got tired of relocating them. What a ******* shame!


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We have quite the coyote problem here in the Hudson Valley - with the ever expanding rail trail bike and hiking trails crowding them in their territories. I do fear them now with 12 pound Louie - never had to worry about that with my large dogs although the coyotes have crazy strategies to lure dogs away. One of them is to initiate play with a dog and then lead it away from its human to its pack where they will all attack it. Coyotes here have stolen (in front of the horrified humans - including young children) 2 Maltese our of a garden and a mini Poodle - also out of a fenced in yard...They have also brazenly attacked a pit-bull while on leash and have displayed complete lack of fear of humans. They are also very large - which leads to speculation if they are part wolf "Coywolves" even though the DEC says no such thing.. So never underestimate the danger they do pose. I don't like their howls (gives me the Willies - although I like almost all nature sounds..) I respect them and I am super vigilant about their ability to snatch dogs..
 

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Off topic here, but we started getting a lot of bears showing up in neighborhoods, swimming pools, ( they want to keep cool too!), screened in porches, etc. The state’s answer was to have a hunting season on bears. The first year only 300 were allowed to be killed in the entire state. But I think they dropped that limit. They got tired of relocating them. What a ******* shame!


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Relocating bears is not very successful from what I understand from people in Idaho. They just come back. Maybe that was just the grizzlies though. Not sure.
 

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We have quite the coyote problem here in the Hudson Valley - with the ever expanding rail trail bike and hiking trails crowding them in their territories. I do fear them now with 12 pound Louie - never had to worry about that with my large dogs although the coyotes have crazy strategies to lure dogs away. One of them is to initiate play with a dog and then lead it away from its human to its pack where they will all attack it. Coyotes here have stolen (in front of the horrified humans - including young children) 2 Maltese our of a garden and a mini Poodle - also out of a fenced in yard...They have also brazenly attacked a pit-bull while on leash and have displayed complete lack of fear of humans. They are also very large - which leads to speculation if they are part wolf "Coywolves" even though the DEC says no such thing.. So never underestimate the danger they do pose. I don't like their howls (gives me the Willies - although I like almost all nature sounds..) I respect them and I am super vigilant about their ability to snatch dogs..

They must be those coywolves because I don't think a coyote would stand a chance with a pit bull. Maybe I'm wrong though. They aren't very large...just leggy. (regular coyotes) That is very scary when they get so bold. And tragic when they take someone's dog. It might be prudent to carry a gun, even it to simply shoot it into the air and scare it off.
 
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