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Interesting, that had never occurred to me. Do you mean an antihistamine so he doesn't react as much to the shot?
Yes exactly.
The treatment for a vaccine reaction, depending on severity, is an injection of diphenhydramine, with the potential addition of a steroid (dexamethasone) injection, and possible recommendation of oral diphenhydramine (Benadryl) every 8-12 hours.
We always recommend for the owners to give one or two doses (every 12 hours) leading up to the next time that vaccine is given. A note is added to the file, so we can ask if the diphen has been given. If the owner forgot (or can't) we will give the injectable form and then wait 15 min before vaccinating. Another (oral) dose can be given at home in 8-12 hours but it's rarely necessary.
Of course it's important to weigh pros and cons of each vaccine for each individual pet, but for important vaccines I can't think of any time that the pre-treating regimen has not worked.
 

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Oh my, all these big words. Even using them worries me.

Sorry, but my Spoo reacts badly to chemicals, even cleaning chemicals, deicer used on the outside of a plane we are in, additives in commercial dog food kibble, etc. He gets bad seizures from the spot on tick prevention. Somehow, this recommendation did not make me feel better. As I need to travel though I will bring this up with his vet.

I am curious, are you a vet? You seem to have quite a knowledge of technical terminology :)
 

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Oh my, all these big words. Even using them worries me.

Sorry, but my Spoo reacts badly to chemicals, even cleaning chemicals, deicer used on the outside of a plane we are in, additives in commercial dog food kibble, etc. He gets bad seizures from the spot on tick prevention. Somehow, this recommendation did not make me feel better. As I need to travel though I will bring this up with his vet.

I am curious, are you a vet? You seem to have quite a knowledge of technical terminology :)
Not a vet, but a vet tech/vet nurse, for 17 years now ?, and have always worked in very busy practices. I like to know the explanations for everything I do, and having worked with many vets over the years I have heard a variety of viewpoints.
I often use the chemical names or technical terms for things, because the common names I am familiar with might be different from country to country or area.
Keep in mind, that many innocuous substances have a chemical name, but that doesn't put them in the same category of things you think of a "chemicals". If I started talking about hydrogen dioxide, that would sound like a chemical you want to avoid with your boy- but it's just the chemical name for water ?. It might be more accurate or useful to think of your spoo as being very sensitive.
So, to clarify: a steroid is only given to a pet that is experiencing a significant reaction. I like to avoid steroids where possible, but they are so useful to break the cycle of inflammation when necessary. I doubt that your dog would need this.
An antihistamine (commonly Benadryl) blocks the body from reacting to a foreign substance (in this case the vaccine). Giving it beforehand means that you prevent the reaction from happening in the first place, rather than responding after the reaction has already started. Think of it as a calming blanket over your dog's overactive immune system ?.
For your dog, it would certainly be particularly important that just the antihistamine is given, no extra additives. Given his history, you may realize on discussing with your vet that he has been given something along these lines in the past. If so, it would be comforting to know that it is safe for him (as it normally is).
 

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Starvt, thank you! I feel so much better after your last explanation. I think you said to just give him Benadryl before his next immunization. Is that correct?
 

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That's right kontiki! A dose of Benadryl an hour or two before the appointment.
You could give a second dose after the vaccine, 12 hrs from the first dose, if you think he needs it.
Might make him a little sleepy (just like us) but less stress at the vet is nice anyway!
 

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Rose n Poos, yes in Canada also Rabies is legally required.
That's actually not true, it is only required in certain Provinces/cities, not all of Canada. After the first year booster I do not personally agree with "scheduled" vaccines unless a titer proves that it is required, or there are other reasons, such as some of the reasons that have been posted previously.

This topic was discussed by myself and others in a past thread on this topic.

A Little Immunity is Enough...

Cheers
 
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