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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so I've heard of making a dog yelp sound when your dog bites you so it helps them learn not to, and I've also heard of snarling at them (like a dog) when they jump on you so that they back down.

But of course with the latter you wait for them to calm after getting down and have 4 on the floor, then you say yes or click or whatever.

Not sure what I think though.

Have you ever used these techniques?

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Not to any good outcomes. Yelping like a hurt pup when Lily put teeth on me made her more hyper. Ignoring her worked much better. When they jump up without permission to do so I moved them off me and asked for a sit or down and praised that. Once they learned that jumping up uninvited wasn't welcome I added "off" as the verbal to go with getting off. After that I taught them to jump up on invitation. Once they knew that they could jump up when I patted my shoulder I added "give hugs" as the order.


We are not dogs and I don't think our dogs are fooled into thinking we are remotely like them by barking or yelping or growling at them.
 
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The yelping usually works for me. Maybe because it startles them but it works. The growling, no. I haven’t really tried it because I feel ridiculous doing it...
 

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Not to any good outcomes. Yelping like a hurt pup when Lily put teeth on me made her more hyper. Ignoring her worked much better. When they jump up without permission to do so I moved them off me and asked for a sit or down and praised that. Once they learned that jumping up uninvited wasn't welcome I added "off" as the verbal to go with getting off. After that I taught them to jump up on invitation. Once they knew that they could jump up when I patted my shoulder I added "give hugs" as the order.


We are not dogs and I don't think our dogs are fooled into thinking we are remotely like them by barking or yelping or growling at them.
Okay. That's how I felt.

I'm still struggling with Leeroy outside as his jumps are not paws up like he wants to get near my face or greet me.. these are the hard ones where he jumps in the air, bounces off of me and spins around.

So it's hard. I've been doing everything I can to research. Most 'jump up' advice involves just the normal jumping up.

I'll keep doing the ignore method.

If they bite do you pull your hand away and say no at all? I'm not sure that ignoring his biting will work well. Maybe it will... I'm still doing the impulse training. I've also been doing it when we're outside since he was biting out there too. I did notice that he has stopped biting when he jumps, for the most part. So there's some progress.

Like I said in my other thread I know it's only been 2 months and he's a teenager. Also, we inadvertently encouraged the jumping for about half that time. So as he's grown more confident it got worse until I realized it was a bad idea.

He's doing great with his mat training though!

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The yelping usually works for me. Maybe because it startles them but it works. The growling, no. I haven’t really tried it because I feel ridiculous doing it...
Okay. Yeah we tried the yelping, sometimes he'd be like 'oh my gosh I'm so sorry' or else he'd get WAY hyper about it. I guess it depends on the dog.

I tried the snarling a bit and it worked very fast but I don't like how it makes me feel. I rewarded him when he'd stop and sit or be calm... But it feels like an aggressive approach...?

Anyway, doing my best. It's hard sometimes.

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Okay. Yeah we tried the yelping, sometimes he'd be like 'oh my gosh I'm so sorry' or else he'd get WAY hyper about it. I guess it depends on the dog.

I tried the snarling a bit and it worked very fast but I don't like how it makes me feel. I rewarded him when he'd stop and sit or be calm... But it feels like an aggressive approach...?

Anyway, doing my best. It's hard sometimes.

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Yeah, the biting/jumping/going crazy phase is definitely the hardest. Hang in there, time does wonders to any dog !
 

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Yeah, the biting/jumping/going crazy phase is definitely the hardest. Hang in there, time does wonders to any dog !
Thank you. I don't mind the jumping up but the hard pounce and biting is for sure the hardest.

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I am now thinking about how my dogs warn off over exuberant youngsters. It starts very subtly - standing still and looking away. It progresses to a tiny shift in ear and tail position. Then The Look, and if that doesn't work, a tiny, almost imperceptible noise in the throat, followed by a slightly louder yip. A full on snarl is almost never necessary, and I rarely see it even with the most obnoxious intruder. I did once roar at Poppy when she nipped me on the bum at the top of the stairs - it was a favourite game of hers but on that occasion I jumped so high I nearly fell down the stairs and was too shocked to be calm about it! Because it was the one and only time it seemed to make her think, and with further less noisy reminders she became a lot more careful.

It is very difficult for us humans to mimic dog language (ever tried pricking your ears?!), and we tend to assume communication is vocal and start making noises. I sometimes think we make the noises we do for our own satisfaction, while our dogs focus on body language first, and only get information from the bizarre noise we make after long familiarity!
 

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Renn now at 11 months is doing so much better with the jumping up. For the most part he is just starting to understand is unacceptable and is putting himself into a sit, a wiggly sit. My personal opinion on the "yelping" is it my work on a very young dog but a teenage dog I wouldn't, I think it would make them more hyper. I still keep a pet convincer on me, but I never have to use it anymore. He has learned no jump, its not permitted ever.
 

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Following this with interest as I have what I call a "bungee" dog. It doesn't matter what I am doing, he is right them and either excited we're going outside, that I'm home, that we're training, everything is exciting to him. Of course, he's only 8 month old but the ignoring, stopping dead in my tracks seems to be the best response but am going to try Lily's technique of shaping it to a sit, rewarding the sit and then eventually adding a signal that permits it for a "hug" or "hello".
 

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fjm I agree with your thoughts about us not being able to do/mimic the most important parts of dog communication which is all about body language and often very subtle...a change in tail set, how slow or fast the tail is wagging, relaxed vs. alert ears, a subtle curl of a lip...all incredibly important to them and impossible for us to do. In fact many of us don't notice many of the more subtle bits.


Lily is very enthusiastic when I return home. If BF is home and lets her out the back door when I am coming into the yard she runs out on the deck and spins like a top. If I allowed it she would run right into me and jump up hard. Since that would likely happen as I reached the top step of the deck and even though she is fairly light could knock me off the steps I always give her a drop signal as she makes eye contact. She lies down and waits until I release her to give a hug once I am on the actual deck and away from the steps.


meljen, keep up your impulse control work. This will help you get this under control. Leeroy is still young enough to learn this stuff without too much trouble even though he didn't get these lessons as a puppy. I really think that some of the ideas discussed in your other thread about jumping and biting will do the trick.
 
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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thank you all for your insight!

Yes Leeroy has actually knocked me off the stairs once lol. It's that hard pounce spin when we're outside. Inside it's just the happiness and wanting to get to our face and it's easy to tell him down and sit. Then we get down to his level and pet him.

I think outside I'll turn away if he jumps, then when he stops I'll have him sit and then treat him. Also he gets a look on his face just before he's going to jump pounce, so maybe I'll have him sit instead.

I always do the impulse method when treating where my hand is closed and he has to calm down before getting the treat.

Just hoping I don't accidentally train him to pounce just so he gets treats!

I've been having all of us do impulse training when we take him out, and indoors when I have chances to. He's like 2 different dogs in the indoor/outdoor situations, at least in our yard.

Again thanks for the insight!
 

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Following this with interest as I have what I call a "bungee" dog. It doesn't matter what I am doing, he is right them and either excited we're going outside, that I'm home, that we're training, everything is exciting to him. Of course, he's only 8 month old but the ignoring, stopping dead in my tracks seems to be the best response but am going to try Lily's technique of shaping it to a sit, rewarding the sit and then eventually adding a signal that permits it for a "hug" or "hello".
Yes I think I like this idea too. Leeroy is very affectionate and constantly loves attention so I think allowing him to get up on me with permission will help him curb the jump pounce. I'll have to try it and see!

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