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I just had the thought to make this post after being reminded of an encounter I had at the park before quarantine. I passed a girl similar in age to myself (mid 20’s) that had a large blue Merle doodle puppy. He was playful and sweet and my heeler and him had a great time playing while we chatted. I will add after working in the vet field I am not a doodle fan due to so many varied experiences with them. But, like all dogs if you must have one then, ya know, get one from a reputable breeder.

It was all fine and dandy until I asked if he was an F1 doodle or F2...she said she had no idea since she’d never seen the parents. Odd, I asked where she got him from. Ready folks....an Amish farm. She had seen how poorly he was and felt bad and paid them over a G bar for this dog. He was full of worms and she’d spent lots of money on fixing him. I did my best at explaining that big breeding operations at those farms are usually puppy mills! It hurt to even hear about. Sweet dog but, just lining the pockets of people who don’t give two craps about their animals well being. I know the argument “someone has to take them” so to clarify my issue is paying LOTS of money is the problem, not that she helped the dog.

I suppose the point being - no pity buying puppies from bad situations!!! It only encourages them to continue the practice. Investigate and ask questions, and it is a huge red flag if they do not allow seeing the parents. Just had to get this story off my mind!
 

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Ugh. Sickening story. I am glad the dog has a good home. I really detest the puppy mill industry with the Amish. But I agree it is not good to pay for them. I've seen people talk about how they "rescued" their dog from a pet store on multiple occasions. I have to seriously bite my tongue.
 

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The sad truth is that most people do not do any research at all before getting a dog. It's an impulse buy. People will shop for boots with more consideration than where they get a puppy. If there are mitigating factors in a dog purchase decision, it is "cuteness" or price, not health or breeder reputability.

When a gentle, kind person is faced with buying a sick puppy, or "leaving him there," of course they buy. What the young woman might have done was report the breeder to authorities for selling sick animals. But no, most people won't do that. And so puppy mills proliferate.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The sad truth is that most people do not do any research at all before getting a dog. It's an impulse buy. People will shop for boots with more consideration than where they get a puppy. If there are mitigating factors in a dog purchase decision, it is "cuteness" or price, not health or breeder reputability.

When a gentle, kind person is faced with buying a sick puppy, or "leaving him there," of course they buy. What the young woman might have done was report the breeder to authorities for selling sick animals. But no, most people won't do that. And so puppy mills proliferate.
It really does blow my mind - it’s a 15 year commitment! I hope my gentle explanation may have planted a seed in her mind. I was sad for the situation but didn’t want to make her feel too bad. Hopefully it will be a thought for her next time.
 

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It really does blow my mind - it’s a 15 year commitment! I hope my gentle explanation may have planted a seed in her mind. I was sad for the situation but didn’t want to make her feel too bad. Hopefully it will be a thought for her next time.
We can hope so. We can always hope. But, I had a similar conversation with my DOCTOR who bought a toy poodle from a puppy mill because she "just couldn't wait to have a poodle, and breeders had waiting lists." Ugh! But we can hope.
 

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I think you need to be delicate about discussing the matter with someone who already has an animal. They aren't going to return their pet, so it's pretty easy to come across like a Debbie Downer for no good purpose.

I usually try to combine "Ooh, cute, squeee" with a couple of questions about common health issues. For example, with Maine Coon cats I ask if the cat is doing the complex vocalizations Maine Coons are known for. (SQUEEE, it's so cute.) I then ask if anyone has discussed HCM testing with them. If the person seems interested I pass along some info and suggest they ask their vet for an opinion. If not, well, it's not my cat or my problem.
 

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I think you need to be delicate about discussing the matter with someone who already has an animal. They aren't going to return their pet, so it's pretty easy to come across like a Debbie Downer for no good purpose.

I usually try to combine "Ooh, cute, squeee" with a couple of questions about common health issues. For example, with Maine Coon cats I ask if the cat is doing the complex vocalizations Maine Coons are known for. (SQUEEE, it's so cute.) I then ask if anyone has discussed HCM testing with them. If the person seems interested I pass along some info and suggest they ask their vet for an opinion. If not, well, it's not my cat or my problem.

The job of advising people on buying a dog, dog food, or dog training pays poorly and is almost never productive. Unless specifically asked, that is a no-win conversation. There will always be puppy mills, poorly bred dogs, and the people who buy them.
 

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The job of advising people on buying a dog, dog food, or dog training pays poorly and is almost never productive. Unless specifically asked, that is a no-win conversation. There will always be puppy mills, poorly bred dogs, and the people who buy them.
In all fairness, you were not there and did not experience the conversation. It was not unproductive and did not cause offense. But thanks anyways.
 

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I think you need to be delicate about discussing the matter with someone who already has an animal. They aren't going to return their pet, so it's pretty easy to come across like a Debbie Downer for no good purpose.

I usually try to combine "Ooh, cute, squeee" with a couple of questions about common health issues. For example, with Maine Coon cats I ask if the cat is doing the complex vocalizations Maine Coons are known for. (SQUEEE, it's so cute.) I then ask if anyone has discussed HCM testing with them. If the person seems interested I pass along some info and suggest they ask their vet for an opinion. If not, well, it's not my cat or my problem.
It did go in that manner. She was not offended and seemed interested as she genuinely did not know.
 
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