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Discussion Starter #1
Zoe will soon be home and we will resume agility training. She has been doing quite well on all obstacles except the broad jump. She walks on the boards.


Has anyone else had that problem? How did you solve it? Or if you did not have it, do you know how it should be handled?
 

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Yes, start with one piece and turn it sideways so she has to jump over it. Add as many pieces as are required for her width. Once she masters it, you can start placing the pieces down and she should understand she needs to jump over.

This is how we're training it anyway :)
 

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I know you can’t wait till Zoe comes home. She’s going to be so happy to see you.

Babykins walked over the broad jump the first time she saw it. I found encouraging her to run toward and over the jump helped. With speed she realized it was an obstacle she could jump over instead of walking. We really didn’t have any trouble so others may have more helpful advice.

I’m sharing some private time at one club with people who are training the broad jump for CD. One of the more advanced trainers turned one of the boards on its side so it was a little higher when she showed someone else how to get her dog to jump over and not walk.
 

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I had to do a lot of work with Javelin to get a good broad jump since he got scared by it because he slipped on the floor on his landing a few times. He jumps 48" and my trainer thinks it is important to try to get the full distance early on. She also think it is important to lead to it from the correct distance. For obedience it is a static start so agility is different regarding the lead up to it.


What we did with Javelin to get it back and make it solid was to set up the four boards at the correct 48". We used the stanchions for a bar jump and set them up at the front of the first board and put the bar very low (8" for Javelin) so that he could see a clear marker for his take off. Initially we did it as a straight recall over the jump. Then gradually I moved slowly to the side behind the jump to introduce the turn. Once Javelin understood the turn after the landing I moved closer to my final position along side the jump. As we did that we added an extra broad jump board along side the last of the 4 boards as a way to avoid cutting the corner of the last board to turn in the later part of the jump.


Since you are doing broad jump for agility you don't have to do the last parts of what we did, but you may find putting the bar jump at the front of the boards to be helpful. It is equivalent to putting the boards up ended.
 
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Putting that jump bar up at the beginning is smart - it's a powerful clue to the dog that they have to jump.
 
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Putting that jump bar up at the beginning is smart - it's a powerful clue to the dog that they have to jump.



It makes them know they really have to take off. You can also use a treat on a target set out 8-10 feet beyond the last board as a way to get them to jump in extension so they don't land on the last board.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Great ideas! Now all I have to do is build the jump pieces (not a problem - my hobby is woodworking, so I have appropriate tools).
 

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Johanna you should be able to find the measurement specifications for the broad jump boards in the rule book. I forgot that you do great wood working. I am sure your boards will be really nice.
 
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