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We just got Noodle, our standard poodle, two weeks ago. She is 11 weeks and just a ball of love and nipping lolol.

My 13 year old is autistic and we primarily got her as a family pet and companion to him. He adores dogs and is taking on many daily cares with supervision.

However I would love to train her more extensively to do some specific therapy/service tasks. Last night for example he asked her to lay on his belly in bed to provide pressure which helps him calm down. She can't do it yet but I would like to train her to do some things like that for him.

If anyone has advice of resources, I would love to hear them. For now we are just going lots of basic obedience.

One thing I'm not sure about is how to get Noodle to bond with him and listen to him more. She looks to me more because as the adult I am doing a lot of the training (and I'm better and more consistent with it since I am an adult).

We start puppy class in a week and my husband or I will be taking Noodle with DS.
 

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I know there are Facebook groups specifically for Autism service dog training. We have members with service dogs here but I would recommend seeking help from a specialist group because the situation is a bit unique. I know that to bond to your son, he will need to take on a major role in her life so having him involved as much as possible will be very important.
 

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Thanks Raindrops! I'll look for some groups. If anyone has specific suggestions, I'm all ears (either training or fb groups ;) )
 

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Sue Eh? (Sue Ailsby) has a facebook page and an email group based around her Training Levels. I don't do the facebook page, but I am on the email group and many people there are training service dogs. Sue has a service dog, currently a PWD with a Giant Schnauzer in training. Her web page is Home | Mind to Mind and the email group is TrainingLevels groups.io Group
 

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One of my rescue Bostons went to a family with an autistic son. He was 13. We think Cinderella was 3. She'd had a horrible life but sparkled with joy. A perfect fit.

As for laying Noodle on your son's stomach, I would not do it. This is a very domineering position for her. She might also get too heavy. However, she might be taught to bring a heavy pillow to him instead. JoAnne's sells beads specifically to make heavy blankets. They are machine washable, so you could create a pillow for him. Someone at the store could probably help you. I would use denim as the cover.
 

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Thoughts on applying pressure. I too would not have Noodle actually get on top of your son. I taught Asta the Stay Close command for lying next to me and applying pressure. That is so helpful to me. I trained this from Asta's already known behavior (lying next to me) and rewarding him for being close, moved the treat farther and farther over me to where he was applying pressure. This is a skill that takes lots of small steps over time.
I don't know much about autism spectrum but I think it would be great to involve your son in any of Noodle's training as he is able to so. Building bonds is so critical.
 

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I‘ve taught several children agility. The youngest was 7. Parents sat outside the ring watching while their child was inside the ring with their dog. One dog was very attached to the mom and it took several weeks to get the dog to focus on the child. I don’t know you or your son but if possible you should both go to training classes and your son should have the main responsibility for training with you as back up. That will help with both the bonding but also the dog following your son’s cues. This would be ideal, however it may not be what works in your family. If you become the main trainer, do include your son in training as much as possible.

I trained my dog to be a mobility service dog. I think I got the best training for taking her out in public with the AKC Canine Good Citizen (CGC) class which was also used to train for therapy dog. I also took the (CGCA) class and earned the advanced CGCA. I would have taken the urban but it wasn’t offered. Taking these classes and passing the test not only taught me how to train my dog for appropriate behavior when out in public, it has given me proof to show anyone that I have done serious training. The CGC class is after puppy classes and some basic obedience classes. If you have a good training program for an autism dog then you may not need this.... but if you don’t I highly recommend CGC. You would train the behaviors your son needs on your own.
 

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Another way to promote bonding is to have your son feed the dog. Noodle should sit before the dish is placed down. This keeps him from jumping up, but also places your son in the authority position.
 
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