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It’s rare to find a young adult Poodle and I have not come across any. I was just hinking that ai might consoder it, if the aituation arose.
However, I was wondering if it’s more difficult to train an older puppy or young adult? I’ve read that if dogs are not socialozed and trained before a certain point, they can only get so far and will never be as smart, well-developed or well trained as dogs that did receive the training and socialization earlier. Obviously, all kinds of dogs are adopted from shelters and rescues at all ages. I don’t know how these dogs end up behaviorally.
Does anyone have experience with getting a young adult or older puppy?
 

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We got our girls from a breeder who had decided to make changes in her breeding program. They were 1y 9m old when they came home with us.

Neither one ever had much interest in playing ball, but loved playing with each other. They were both more people oriented. Holly was shy, Noel didn't know a stranger. They were housetrained when we got them. Other than taking a while to help Holly become more social, I see very little difference in socialization and ability to learn between our girls and our current boys, who we took home at almost 9 weeks.

It will depend on a lot of things, but older in and of itself doesn't mean untrained or unsocialized. Even a dog from an underdeveloped background can blossom in the right environment.
 

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I have come across two standards thats were rehomed, one @ 8 months the other @18 months. I've heard the 8 month old is great and gets along well with the families 2nd poodle. I personally know the 18 month old. He too is a great dog. Already housebroken, walks well on leash, doesn't jump when he greets you. The rescue these dogs cam from is a good one and matched up the dogs with the proper families, which I think is also important. I would not pass up a older dog, In fact I was very interested in the 8 month old but was too late. By then I had the "fever" and began looking. Found a breeder with two white males, I really wanted red or brown but didn't care. Anyway she was very nice gave me lots of info and as we spoke she learned I wanted a calm boy. She felt hers was not suitable and one was small, next thing I knew she had me in contact with another breeder who was delivering a puppy to her friend who lives about 15 minutes from me and she was bringing two males down for her friend to choose. Well her friends husband wouldn't let her keep the puppy and I got to choose. I already knew they came from a nice show line, and were health tested. It just happened. LOL I am forever grateful.
 

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I’m not speaking from a poodle position. We got a beagle almost 11 years ago. I call her a rescue because we got her from a local breeder who was getting out of the business. If we did not want her, she was going to the pound. She spent her first 6 months of her life in a kennel run with her mom and siblings and then the next bitch and her babies. They were fed a diet of mostly grain. I’m not sure about the early puppy days, but he mostly checked on them once a week. Oh, did I mention the kennel was on a piece of property out in the country and they lived in town? They had a lab mix who wondered the property to protect it from predators.

When we got her she was the shy dog ‘hiding’ in the corner. She displayed all the signs of the puppy to avoid (except aggression.) We brought her home on trial to see if she got along with our high anxiety dog. She worshiped the ground he walked on, so he loved her. She stayed with us and avoided the pound.

I Was horribly suited to helping her over come all her issues, but slowly I’ve learned and she is wonderful. It took some time and training but she was comfortable in the house and loved guests; however, once we left the house, she was a bundle of nerves. She loooooves food but won’t take treats out of the house. I did not know how to train her if she would not take treats.

About 2 summers ago I started reading some behavior books. Then took Susan Garrett’s course. It finally clicked with me and I was able to help her. 2 summers ago, she came out of her shell when I realized how tiny “small steps” needed to be in order for her to gain confidence. She loved walks with people, dogs barking, cars driving by and construction now. She became a pain to walk because she no longer walked next to me but was trying to run off to go play with the Great Dane. We had to retrain manors. (This is where being a beagle changes from a poodle because she is still a rather dumb and dense dog. We love her anyway!)

If she was not 11, I was not pregnant with kid #5, and we lived closer to classes and testing, I’d officially get her CGC and start the TDI training. I always knew with how wonderful she was with guests and that she would be a perfect therapy dog if it was not for her fears outside of the house.

If I knew what I know now when we got her, we would have been able to work through her set backs in the first couple of years. It would not have been the same as adopting from a good breeder that did everything to set her up for a great life, but we would get there. I can’t say every dog can over come everything, but she did.

When we start our poodle hunt, we are going to look for an adult. I’m hoping for a retired show/breeding dog. It will depend on our house life on how ‘perfect’ the dog will have to be. (For a lack of better term) I’m waiting for the kids to be older so I have tons of time to spend on training, but I don’t know how much I’ll risk in insuring I get my therapy dog. A puppy from a breeder who does all the neurological things, puppy culture, and temperament testing feels safer, but it is still no guarantee. We will see what 3-5 years bring us!
 
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Well now lets see Tina 8 months,Shotsie 3 yrs, Jasmine 3, Bella 1.5 yr and Cayenne 1.5 yrs, Sage 5 years. Give me a young adult or older adult anytime, they all turned out pretty much the same. Trained them as if they were puppies my way. Sage was shy, but has really come out of it
 

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I have dealt with a few animal rescue groups before, while there are some challenging dogs out there, a large portion of them are actually perfectly normal dogs waiting for a new home. Every dog is unique and requires a different level of skills to handle, if you get in touch with a good rescue group, they will ask about your experience and suggest a dog suitable for your skill level. I have seen many adopted dogs that are actually very friendly and easy to train.
 

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Oh and I have another story.not poodle...many years ago our local shelter took in 88 dogs of all ages mostly chihuahuas and pugs. Most got rehired but there were a few stragglers still left at the shelter. Having 1 chihuahua already I went to look...well there were no puppies..just 3 dogs left. All probably 4-5 years old. There was one while spotted chi smaller sized cowering in the corner..I brought him home. I bought a puppy play pen and placed a small crate in it. Thats where he lived and he would cower anytime I reached in for him, but I took him for walks every day alongside the other chi. I had him until last year so about 13 years. He was the happies, friendliest dog ever . WE lost him last Thanksgiving to CHF. The only issue we had is he could not be unsupervised loose in house as he would pee or poo, never thought his crate so he was very easily managed.
 

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I got my minipoo when she was almost a year old - hasn't stopped me from training her to compete in competition dog sports. Lots of shelter dogs compete in dog sports too.
 

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Totally depends on the dog's temperament + how it was raised thus far. Some have a lot of baggage, some are really easy.

Our shelter Chi/rat terrier/? mix is absolutely the most amazing dog. She has the fewest vices, is super loving, and is extremely smart and trainable. My sister rescued her at 1 year old from a high kill shelter in L.A. where she most likely would have been euthanized because she is black (such a beauty) and a Chi mix and the shelters are overflowing with this kind of dog.
 

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Three of our four dogs are shelter dogs.

The oldest one, Cruise, a border collie/whippet cross, was adopted at 9 months. He had been surrendered - probably because he was too boisterous for a family that included a toddler. He has been a sweet, biddable dog all his life (he is 13 now). He is the only dog allowed to sleep on our bed because of his senior dog status. He raised Zoe, the mini poo, and did an excellent job as a dog daddy.


Next is Miss Molly, the chihuahua/pomeranian cross. She is eight and we adopted her last year. This year has seen her really come into her own as a tiny personality. She is cute and totally charming. She does high fives and is the first dog to sound alerts when a car is heard within a quarter mile.


The third rescue is Opal, a more or less Labrador retriever. She is definitely a work in progress. We adopted her about six months ago. She had been in the prison training program in southern New Mexico. She knows quite a few commands, but is, like most Labs, rowdy and energetic. If I can just get her to stop digging up the landscape and potted plants, all will be well! She is Zoe's best friend and companion is mischief.


All three of our rescue dogs are happy and well-adjusted. I'll certainly agree that a well-raised puppy is easier to manage, but these three have enriched our lives. None of them is as smart or learns as quickly as Zoe - but then Zoe is a poodle!
 

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My Tpoo, Jetson, came to me from his breeder at 8 months. She had held him back as a prospect and then decided that he wasn't growing out of his east-west front feet.

He has been the best little companion. He settled in really well and almost 5 years later he acts as if he has never met a stranger. I highly recommend the older puppies or adults.
Sheilah
 
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