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Hi everyone

I am hoping to get a poodle in the next few years. I have a 10 year old little dog, so I want to make sure it is the right decision for him and me before putting my name on any waiting list. I only know one person with a purebred poodle(I know a lot of mixes though!), so I thought I'd source out somewhere online where I can find poodle owners :)

My dog is very energetic and plays with other dogs and puppies, but I worry that he may be too old for bringing a puppy into the house. He could be 13 by the time I get one. He has bad knees(I did get him from a show breeder, but he still has luxating patellas on both legs) so this is a concern. Has anyone gotten a puppy while they had a senior dog? How did it go? Please be honest with your thoughts, I only want what's best for my dog and any potential puppy.

The second question I have is size. I am unsure about whether to go for a toy or miniature. My dog is 7lbs and I find him quite small. I am always worried about him. I know there are dogs a lot smaller than him, but I still worry. He nearly got attacked by a big dog when he was a puppy in a training class. He was unharmed thankfully as the owner pulled the dog back on time, but the trainer said I needed to be so careful as other dogs could think he was a rabbit in the distance and go for him. Ever since then I have been so worried every time I bring him out and always on alert for dogs running loose. I think I might be more confident with a miniature poodle? I know they are still small, but not so tiny.
On the other hand I use public transport and would like to bring the dog with me to places - a toy might be easier for that?

I understand that poodles are energetic dogs. Would play/fetch in the garden and a 45 min walk be enough for a toy or miniature?

What are your thoughts?
 

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We're an older couple with a mini that weighs 16 pounds. He's just right for us.

Yours could probably do public transport with you if you're capable of lifting him if need be. We walk our dog about 40 minutes a day, but if we miss a day, he's fine.

I thought about toys too, but mini's are sturdier. And, frankly, I was less likely to damage one.

There are thought-provoking threads here on buying a puppy. Reading them is worthwhile. And, while I'm not an expert, others here are. So I'm sure you'll be getting several responses.

Good luck.
 

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It really depends on the temperaments of the dogs, I got not one but two puppies one 27 weeks after the first when my elder poodle was 13 years old it brought new life to her all my poodles are lovers not not fighters, basically they are not dominant.
 

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Thank you for your replies.

My dog is definitely not a fighter, I know he'd love another dog. I just worry the age gap would be too much. I am happy to hear it worked out so well for someone else!
 

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It was over 35 years ago for me. My memories are clear but few. I had a 13 year old miniature poodle girl. She was still clear of mind and sight and hearing but definitely slowing down physically.

After my mother died I didn't think I could stand the inevitable loss again so soon, so without consulting Missy, I brought a new puppy into our home.

Initially there was not a meeting of the minds. Puppy Sass was a pain in the rear for Missy and Missy had to find ways to escape. She started moving faster, then started jumping up on the sofa again to escape. One day I noticed that instead of escaping, Missy started reciprocating Sass's play and then suddenly it was Game On for the two of them.I spent more evenings at home just to watch them together.

Sass definitely brought fun and activity and companionship to Missy thru her last years. Without even considering how it would affect Missy, I accidentally made a best possible decision for her. This isn't everyone's good luck but it was ours.
 

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I have a sweet little mini puppy who is now 17lbs at 9 months old, and honestly I think he's just about the perfect size. Then again I wanted somebody a little bigger/sturdier built. I've been lucky enough to know a couple of purebred poodles during my life and they have all been wonderful dogs, but one of the best was a little mini named Moe that I "dog sat" when I was a teenager. He was the sweetest dog, and very funny his owner had taught him a bunch of tricks. It's because of him that I fell in love with mini's.

Unfortunately it is true (at least in my exp.) that big dogs will sometimes go after really little dogs, I had a 10lb pomeranian who was almost attacked by big dogs a couple of times. That also influenced my decision on what size poodle to get, though I admit I did consider Beaus brother. He is a beautiful black toy, but a bit bigger like their father. But I wouldn't trade Beau for all the gold in the world, we got very lucky with him he was/is perfect for us. He is the calmest puppy I have ever known, very chill. He tends to be low-moderate energy, and honestly is pretty good with just running around in the yard a little and playing in the house.

You know your dog better than anyone, if you think he could handle a puppy then it shouldn't be a problem. My pom Lilly was 10yrs old when I brought home 2yr old poodle mix Charlie, and yes she was upset for awhile. But she got over it and they became great friends. :)

my mini puppy Beau

468557
 

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In regard to toy vs miniature, I think you are right to lean toward miniature. They are certainly sturdier than toys. Mine is an in size miniature and he is 16 lbs. I could probably get a dog backpack to carry him in if I took him on public transport. It's just about conditioning them to relax and behave for this. I think they're an excellent size blend of portable yet still able to do all the big dog stuff.

For bringing a pup in with an older dog, it depends on the dog. I would probably not readily bring a puppy into the home if the senior dog is deteriorating significantly in regard to health and mobility. Deaf, blind, or arthritic dogs I think are less likely to be able to tolerate a puppy and it just adds stress they don't deserve. If I was to do so, I'd want to be sure the older dog had safe space completely separate from the pup.

But if you have an older dog that is still in good physical and mental shape... I don't see any issue with it. Like Rose n Poos said... it can be good for them. The important thing is to make sure they are a priority in the decisions you're making.
 

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I am facing a similar dilemma, with two older dogs. Sophy, my papillon, would cope well with a puppy and be a great help in educating it; Poppy, my toy poodle, has liver failure, and while she would once have loved to have a puppy to play with, now the stress would simply be too much. So I will wait, and make the most of time I have left with her.

Like you I am torn between a toy - easier to lift as we both get older, happy with rather less exercise, quicker to groom - and a mini. Just watching Raindrops' Misha run is enough to make anyone long for a mini... I think the answer may be an oversize toy - big enough to hold her own in most circumstances, small enough to lift easily. I did once have a pup attacked by an ex-racing greyhound, but fortunately most people here are more sensible than her dippy owner, so that is not a major consideration for us.
 

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Thank you for all your replies! They are so helpful - I really appreciate you taking the time to share your experiences and views.

I think there are pros and cons to both toy and mini for me. Right now I am leaning towards a mini due to the sturdiness, but I will give it more thought.
 

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I cant really give you first hand experiences of the poodle itself as I dont have mine yet, I am on a waiting list for a black mini.

I had very similar considerations as you do except I dont have another dog. I live in a busy city, I use public transport and I want to be able to take my dog on a bike.

I first set out to find a toy poodle, preferably in silver or red. At the beginning I said any colour except white or black :ROFLMAO:. But I had a difficult time finding toy breeders with the same priorities as I and when I was only looking at toy poodle breeders my list became extremely short. So I widened my net and added the miniature breeders as well. I am very happy that I did because I found a miniature breeder that I immediately preferred over all of the toy poodle breeders that I had found.

Don't get me wrong, once I had filtered out the puppy mills and BYB (which were disturbingly numerous :cry:) I was looking at reputable show breeders. They all had beautiful dogs and I would happily hand over the list I made to anyone looking for a toy or miniature breeder in Belgium, Luxembourg, western-Germany or eastern-France. The breeder that I have tentatively picked (I still have to visit, can't because of covid) just from my perspective goes a little bit above and beyond than what is considered to be best practice in the region. She was very happy to talk to me for over an hour about temperament and health and didn't mind at all when I had critical questions. Does a bit more extensive health testing as well.

So thats how my quest for a silver toy poodle ended in a miniature black poodle :ROFLMAO:

But I think this depends on the region, in other places it might be easier to find a good toy breeder than a mini.

I am slightly concerned that it will be a little too big for me to carry comfortably. But on the flip side there are some big dogs in the extended family, it will be nice to be able to visit without worrying about my poodle being too fragile. I will just have to wait and see. I think dealing with the practical issues of a slightly larger dog is worth it if its coming from a good breeder. Actually, if I wouldn't have found any good poodle breeders I would have picked another breed.

I am planning on buying a backpack before it comes home with us so we can get it used to that immediately. That will be very useful when using public transport or travelling by bike. I will just buy a cheap one to start with and then invest in a better one once its fully grown.

You never know how big they end up. Everytime my family got a puppy we bought things like crates etc. Estimating the adult size of the pup and hoping that it would be a one time purchase and everytime they ended up the wrong size once the pup grew up... or maybe we are just very bad at estimating the final size of dogs :ROFLMAO:
 
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