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My puppy Galen was like a vacuum cleaner up until around 7 months. He tapered off a bit for a while and then got very hungry again around a year. He slowed down again around 15 months. He was always a skinny boy; now he is at a good weight. Our newest puppy Ritter also had a hearty appetite, but he wasn't quite as intense about it as Galen. He was also a chubby boy and remains comfortably well padded at almost a year. He seems to be a competitive eater; I suspect I will need to watch his weight in the future. I'm currently feeding the pair 3 small kibble meals a day, plus I fill a couple of Kong Wobblers for them. They won't work the Wobblers unless they are hungry, so using them is a way to ensure Galen gets the extra calories he needs without Ritter and my greedy cat turning into blimps.
 

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HaHa! This made me chuckle! Made me think of those hot-dog eating contests馃ぃ! (if this is a touchy issue, please note that no offense is intended)
It's kind of funny. I put a bowl down in front of each dog. Ritter will go to whichever bowl I touched last. Then Galen tries to switch bowls, so Ritter runs to the bowl Galen wants. This continues until I either stand between the two bowls to keep them from switching or until both dogs are eating from the same bowl. After finishing one bowl they will both go to the second bowl and finish it too. Then Galen looks mournfully between the two empty bowls. I don't like them eating so fast; I worry about vomiting or even bloat. As I said, I find the Kong Wobbler helpful; it makes food available if they are hungry without letting them mindlessly gorge.
 

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Leo (GSD), Lily (APBT), and Simon (SPoo)
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This is an example of a dog that is too thin. This was my Ilka after being boarded for over two weeks. She went into the kennel about two pounds under her ideal weight, and lost another six while she was there. She was very easily stressed, and was somewhat hard to keep weight on at the best of times. She was 22" tall, and weighed 40 pounds in these pictures.

Dog Dog breed Carnivore Grass Dog supply


Dog Carnivore Dog breed Collar Working animal
 
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Wellie the black spoo
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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Do you have pictures?
[/QUOTE]

I have a video of him after the bath so that might give you a better idea because he is in a bear clip but I cannot seem to post it....
Wheel Tire Photograph Vehicle Car
 

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Wellie the black spoo
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
This is an example of a dog that is too thin. This was my Ilka after being boarded for over two weeks. She went into the kennel about two pounds under her ideal weight, and lost another six while she was there. She was very easily stressed, and was somewhat hard to keep weight on at the best of times. She was 22" tall, and weighed 40 pounds in these pictures.

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Thanks for sharing, I do see what you mean... your girl was beautiful nonetheless! Mine is not stressed/ has no reason not to eat. I'm clearly the reason he has not eaten more unfortunately.
 

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I was keen to "free feed" him but that proved impossible, he just would not stop and would make him sick even with the slow feeders. He just eats non stop, I wonder if he is a real poodle honestly... he likes everything, least picky dog I have ever met. He is just stomach with legs. But that might also be because he is hungry because he is not eating enough. I will let you guys know if he eats less now that he will get more kibbles.
Transitioning a very hungry puppy to free-feeding would definitely need to be done slowly, especially in a breed prone to bloat. But do chat with your vet about the difference between vomiting and occasional regurgitation. The latter doesn鈥檛 necessarily warrant concern.
 

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Wellie the black spoo
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Transitioning a very hungry puppy to free-feeding would definitely need to be done slowly, especially in a breed prone to bloat. But do chat with your vet about the difference between vomiting and occasional regurgitation. The latter doesn鈥檛 necessarily warrant concern.
Thank you very much. I won't be transitioning to free feeding because that's not really possible with raw food (cannot leave the food too long) anyways. I'm just going to multiply what he is eating by 1.5 (with the slow feeders + Kongs) and then possibly up to even more in the following weeks if he still seems hungry. But I will do it slowly and divide the meals as much as possible (he is still eating 3 times a day but I might go to 4). He has not vomited in the past 4 months, he only did it when I had just gotten him and tried to free-feed. If he starts vomiting often again I will see a vet just to make sure it is regurgitation cause I must admit not really understanding the difference.
 

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This is an example of a dog that is too thin. This was my Ilka after being boarded for over two weeks. She went into the kennel about two pounds under her ideal weight, and lost another six while she was there. She was very easily stressed, and was somewhat hard to keep weight on at the best of times. She was 22" tall, and weighed 40 pounds in these pictures.

View attachment 486661

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These pictures of Ilka are great. They show her backbone and the hollow between her hip bones so clearly. Galen went through a couple of periods when I could clearly feel the sharpness of his hip bones and vertebrae. Galen didn't look skinny, because he had poodle fluff on top, but he definitely needed more padding. Right now I can feel his hip bones, but he has a decent cushion between them, and I don't feel like I'm stroking road gravel when I run my hand down his back to his tail.
 

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Thank you very much. I won't be transitioning to free feeding because that's not really possible with raw food (cannot leave the food too long) anyways. I'm just going to multiply what he is eating by 1.5 (with the slow feeders + Kongs) and then possibly up to even more in the following weeks if he still seems hungry. But I will do it slowly and divide the meals as much as possible (he is still eating 3 times a day but I might go to 4). He has not vomited in the past 4 months, he only did it when I had just gotten him and tried to free-feed. If he starts vomiting often again I will see a vet just to make sure it is regurgitation cause I must admit not really understanding the difference.
Hope you鈥檒l keep us updated on his progress. :)
 

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Also like better than bouillon. Adds some calories in a tasty way. Like others I would up the food.
 

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Urbie
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Urbie is now 9 months and 65lbs. The bag says he should be eating 3 1/4 cups of food. He eats Purina chicken and rice for large breeds. I've been noticing he has been eating less lately. He is also very picky. As you can see he is in top form. He is not over-weight nor is he underweight.
Snow Dog Dog breed Black Carnivore
 

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Please be careful with any sort of broth or bouillon. A single teaspoon of 鈥淩EDUCED SODIUM鈥 Better Than Bouillon contains a whopping 500 mg of sodium. That鈥檚 22% of the recommended daily intake for humans, so imagine how that translates to a dog鈥榮 body mass? :eek:

Yes, it鈥檚 super tasty. I use it in my own cooking. But a lot of that tastiness comes from plain old salt. It鈥檚 definitely not suitable as a daily topper unless diluted well beyond the recommended serving size.
 

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Please be careful with any sort of broth or bouillon. A single teaspoon of 鈥淩EDUCED SODIUM鈥 Better Than Bouillon contains a whopping 500 mg of sodium. That鈥檚 22% of the recommended daily intake for humans, so imagine how that translates to a dog鈥榮 body mass? :eek:

Yes, it鈥檚 super tasty. I use it in my own cooking. But a lot of that tastiness comes from plain old salt. It鈥檚 definitely not suitable as a daily topper unless diluted well beyond the recommended serving size.
This is a good point and very true!
Bone broth would be a better option. Make your own easily in the instant pot, or buy it in some stores.
 

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Urbie
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Please be careful with any sort of broth or bouillon. A single teaspoon of 鈥淩EDUCED SODIUM鈥 Better Than Bouillon contains a whopping 500 mg of sodium. That鈥檚 22% of the recommended daily intake for humans, so imagine how that translates to a dog鈥榮 body mass? :eek:

Yes, it鈥檚 super tasty. I use it in my own cooking. But a lot of that tastiness comes from plain old salt. It鈥檚 definitely not suitable as a daily topper unless diluted well beyond the recommended serving size.
I would never give my dog Bouillon as a topper, that's like soy sauce. So much sodium. Yikes!
 

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Much of the bone broth I see has onion in it. One at Mollie Stone's has carrots instead, so that would be safe.
 
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