Poodle Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
Our standard puppy is now nearly 5 months old and in the last couple of weeks has been able to walk to the door and sometimes tap to say she needs to go out.
We were on a streak of no accidents for over a week until a couple of days ago when she started going inside without warning. Even going in her crate whilst my partner was stood with the door open for her to go out.
Has anyone had a similar situation or have any ideas why?
Thanks very much!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,881 Posts
Get her checked for a UTI for sure. And Peggy is also correct that she is too young to be able to resist urgent signs from her full bladder (or bowel for that matter). This takes generally 6 months or a little more for most dogs to develop.
 
  • Like
Reactions: robbiewatson

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
We're there with you. Happy is just over 5mo old and is just about there. We have an accident maybe once or twice a week - although human error is usually to blame.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,275 Posts
The regression and peeing in the crate would concern me. Has there been a change in diet or schedule? UTI is something I'd wonder about.

At 5 months Galen seemed utterly hopeless. If he had been my first puppy I would have been convinced he was defective. At six months he became increasingly interested in lifting his leg when we were on walks instead of doing the puppy squat. The increase in leg lifting corresponded to a reduction in house accidents. I think both were an indication that he was maturing and getting better control. At 8 months he still has the occasional incident, and he's definitely not reliable enough that I leave him loose if I go out, but I'm not confining him strictly when I'm at home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone. We're going to give it a couple of days and if continues we'll give the vet a call to check for the UTI.
As for routine changes not really, we're hoping it is just a phase of naughtiness. We did forget to enzyme spary her vet bed before washing so it could be she's confused too!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,973 Posts
It's definitely not naughtiness. Luckily, dogs don't think that way. :) But if she's had previous accidents on her bed, she could absolutely be confused. It's possible she's still not entirely clear on where she should (and shouldn't) be going.

Are you using a divider in her crate so she only has enough room to comfortably stretch out and sleep? And is she getting a treat and loads of joyful praise each time she potties outside? (That means outside, right where she potties. Not once she's back inside.)

It's easy to pull back on this stuff when it seems like they're getting it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,881 Posts
I totally agree with Peggy's comments and also will add that if you ease up on what you have been doing because you think she gets it too soon she is more prone to make mistakes because she isn't getting the messages about how important this is at this point. We also never gave soft bedding in crates to our dogs until we knew they were really capable of holding their bladders (especially). Hate to sound mean about this but if you have to lie down in your own pee you will learn quickly not to pee where you have to lie down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
I second peggy's recommendation on giving treats when your pup goes potty outside.. Basil's 22 weeks old now and the addition of treats in excess on our potty trips outside during the last 2-3 weeks has been a game changer. If you normally give 1 treat for good behavior, try giving 3 or 4 because it's really good behavior. Your anxiety around puppy potting will go down and you'll have a hallelujah moment.

Sometimes we forget how treat motivated our puppies are or we let our foot off the treat pedal. No, keep the pedal down. Treats treats treats.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,973 Posts
She wasn't having accidents, but Peggy did go on a morning potty strike for a while, and my husband was super reluctant to return to treats. I don't know why. They work!

I think some people see treats as bribes. But that's why you don't produce the treat until you're getting the desired behaviour. Then it's not a bribe. It's just a way to say (in Doggy): "Yes, this is exactly what we want from you."

Even older poodles can need occasional reminders. We had to return to a rigid potty training protocol with our senior girl.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,881 Posts
Treats can be bribes! You have to be careful about the presentation of the treat. Make sure it doesn't lure the desired behavior once the dog has acquisition. And yes Peggy it is often a good idea to revisit rewards to reinforce behaviors that are desired. We wouldn't keep doing a job if after a while there was no paycheck anymore, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Happy seemed to understand going outside almost immediately and would.go on command. Bladder control was the issue her first 6 weeks at home. If we neglected to get her out every couple of hours, she would squat and go wherever she was. Thankfully that's behind us now. She can go several hours and lets us know when she's gotta go. I used lots if praise in the beginning. Anything more than "Good girl" now seems a bit much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yeah we'll definitely be going back to treating for it! She had the divider still, we recently extended it a bit. She's growing so quickly we swear we see a difference over night haha!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,973 Posts
Dr. Dunbar (aka The Master of All Things Puppy) says it best:

Why praise the puppy? Isn't relief sufficient reward?

It is far better to express your emotions when praising your puppy for getting it right, than when reprimanding the poor pup for getting it wrong. So really praise that pup: "Gooooooooood Puppy!" Housetraining is no time for understated thank yous. Don't be embarrassed about praising your puppy. Embarrassed dog owners usually end up with housesoiling problems. Really reward your puppy. Tell your puppy that he has done a most wonderful and glorious thing!

Why offer treats? Isn't praise sufficient reward?

In a word, no! The average person cannot effectively praise a moribund lettuce. And specifically, many owners—especially men—seem incapable of convincingly praising their puppies. Consequently, it might be a good idea to give the pup a food treat or two (or three) for his effort. Input for output! "Wow! My owner's great. Every time I pee or poop outside, she gives me a treat. I never get yummy treats when I do it on the couch. I can't wait for my owner to come home so I can go out in the yard and cash in my urine and feces for food treats!" In fact, why not keep some treats in a screw-top jar handy to the doggy toilet?

Why freeze-dried liver?

Housetraining is one of those times when you want to pull out all of the stops. Take my word for it: When it comes to housetraining, use the Ferrari of dog treats — freeze-dried liver.

Do we really have to give three liver treats when the puppy pees or poops? Isn't this a wee bit anal retentive?

Yes and no. Certainly you do not have to give your puppy exactly three treats every time. But it's a funny thing: If I suggest that people offer a treat each time their puppy eliminates promptly in the right place, they rarely follow instructions. Whenever I tell people to give three treats, however, they will painstakingly count out the treats to give to their puppy. Here’s what I am trying to say: Handsomely praise and reward your puppy every time he uses a designated toilet area.


(My only word of caution would be re: liver. Some dogs can't tolerate it in more than very small quantities.)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,973 Posts
Yeah we'll definitely be going back to treating for it! She had the divider still, we recently extended it a bit. She's growing so quickly we swear we see a difference over night haha!
They totally change overnight at that age! It's wild! My favourite are the short little awkward stages. Peggy's back legs grew more rapidly than her front legs. She looked very funny.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,881 Posts
Happy seemed to understand going outside almost immediately and would.go on command. Bladder control was the issue her first 6 weeks at home. If we neglected to get her out every couple of hours, she would squat and go wherever she was. Thankfully that's behind us now. She can go several hours and lets us know when she's gotta go. I used lots if praise in the beginning. Anything more than "Good girl" now seems a bit much.
Understanding the concept and having the neuromuscular development to execute are two different things. House breaking can fall apart very quickly when people think understanding and being able to execute are the same things. I was just reading up on extinction of trained responses to conditioned stimuli and early omission of rewards this afternoon. It is very easy to have a good behavior fall apart if praise and meaningful rewards are not presented or are faded too much too soon. You should now still be always offering generous praise and variable reinforcement schedule of rewards. Specifically you can offer treats to pay very prompt responses to potty on command orders as a DRE (differential reinforcement of excellent behaviors). To maintain the value of the orders I still sometimes pay for excellent responses with either play or a couple of treats with my 5 and 12 year old dogs. Since I show them I need to know they go into rally or obedience rings with empty bladders and bowels since soiling the ring is a really stupid way to waste an entry and the $30 I paid for it.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top