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Hello!
At first I got my puppy Y shaped harness. We used that when he was 3 months. But whenever he pulls, he will make very bad choking sound. So i was worried.
And then i got him vest type harness. He still make that choking sound when he pulled too hard . Not as bad as the first harness. I thought it was normal.
and yeah, my puppy still pulls. And I’m desperately trying to train him to stop pulling.
Even now he pulls even more. More intense.
We didnt go on walks for quite awhile since covid19 strikes. A couple weeks ago, i tried to take him on walk. Put him on the vest harness. Oh boy he pulled like craaaaazy. I just get along with that. I’m sure he was very excited from not going on walks for so long.
then i looked up videos on walk training toy poodle. Then i found a video where they showed comparisons between walking their toy poodle with harness and with collar leash. He definitely have more control on his poodle on collar leash. And i too read somewhere people said using collar leash is much better than harness since harness is made for pulling LOL and we wont get anywhere using harness.
so, a week ago i put my pupper on test. We walk around the house with collar leash and he walks just fine. even if he pulls, he will stop and come back to me. No harsh pulling at all. Great!
and then, a few days ago, i took him out. And oh boy, we were just a few steps away from front door and he was already running around, jumps, pulls like crazy. He couldn’t hide his excitement. Despite the collar pulling.
ok, we took a few steps of walk, and he still pulls intensely. And so i stop walking. Expecting he will stops too. He stopped pulling after a while. He sat down, but the leash is still tense. I thought, okay. And took one step. He got up and PULLS again. when i stop and ignores, he will sit. And then i took a step again. Then he pulls again.
So i stopped walking and ignored him entirely. Then he sat, i still ignores him because the leash still tense. And then he got up and pulled. I stood still on my feet. He pulled so bad that he made choking sound. I got worried and told him to stop. He ignored me. Even when i told him to sit, nothing. He still pulled even though he was choking himself. It was so bad that i gave up, lifted him and we went back home. No walk on that day.
Does anyone dog do this too? Which works best for you? Harness or Collar ? i want to train him with collar leash again. But i dont want to break his trachea.
oh! And when we go on walk, his nose is ALWAYS on the ground. Not just sniffing. He will pick on whatever he found on the ground. Leaves, dirt, pebbles, sticks, ants, weird bugs. (His favourite wild life snack is ants. He sees one, he chomp. I always always tell him to not do that. Maybe he was a frog in his past life. Or an anteater) I always got to have my eyes on him and whenever he is chewing something i have to take it out from his mouth. His tongue always have dirt whenever we go on walk.
 

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I would never put collar on a toy for walking. It can cause damage to their necks, especially if they pull. We always have collars on the girls (super loose) just in case one were to get out. But for walks it’s always the harnesses. My girls liked the step in harnesses.
 

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I agree with the others—no collar. A collapsing trachea is tough to deal with, much more so than pulling :(. And a harness is much less likely to slip off and/or break.

I have a dog (JRT mix) that used to pull pretty hard, much like you are describing. She would work herself into a mess, barking and yanking and running around like a lunatic. What I ended up doing was:

Worked on her leash skills inside first. This was a neutral environment that wouldn’t excite her.
Starting out walks by taking her out in the front yard and making her heel nicely, then going back inside. We slowly worked up to different areas of the neighborhood as she showed me she could handle it.
Taking her on more frequent, longer walks, while also working on her leash skills inside.
Getting her energy out in different ways, such as chasing toys inside.

She still pulls, as I’m still working with her, and getting her to heel when a squirrel is nearby is out of the question 😂 but she has improved. When Fluffy, our toy poodle, started to pull a little, I did the same thing, and he generally has no issues.

An extra point I need to make, however—we did not see improvement overnight. We’ve been working on this for the past year now, as I can find time with college and work. You might have faster results, since he is a puppy and you likely have more time than I do.

I really recommend you look up Zak George, he does a better job at explaining these things than I do. This is a good video.
 

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This is going to be a very long process for you. Choose a positive reinforcement training method and stick with it. As already mentioned, it could be a year or more before you see consistent results. Some days will be good. Some will be bad. But no, I do not ever recommend using a collar for leash training such a small dog. The damage can be devastating.

One tip you can start applying right now, while you decide on which professional's method you're going to use: Tension means no forward movement. None. Ever. Every single time you take a step forward with a tight leash, you're teaching puppy that pulling works. In fact, you're teaching them to pull HARDER for faster results. So now you're going to have to undo that learned behaviour.

The good news is that puppy is still very young. So if you apply that rule immediately, you should start seeing some positive progress (keeping in mind that every new environment will likely require a return to basics and lots of patience).
 

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Once the dog gets into the habit of pulling it doesn't much matter what kind of restraint you use: the dog will pull. I wasn't as good as I should have been about discouraging Pogo from pulling when he was young. When he got worse I put him into a front clip harness. He merely learned how to pull while jumping backwards. Stupid human!

What you need to do is convince your pup that pulling is completely unrewarded. Stop moving when there is tension on the leash. By tension, I mean the leash forms a straight line between you and the ring on the dog's harness. There should always be a bit of a dip, not a straight line. As soon as the slack is gone and you can't see the dip anymore, stop walking.

Stand there until your dog looks over his shoulder to see what your problem is. When he looks, he will probably shift his body just a little bit. This shift will probably introduce just a tiny bit of slack in the leash. Reward it by stepping forward. Keep stepping until the dog lunges forward and hits the end of the leash. You will probably make it about four or five feet before you lose the slack and need to stop. Wait for the dog to give you slack again. Lather, rinse, repeat for as long as it takes. One of my friends said it took him a solid month to get his terrier puppy to stop pulling via this method.

Yes, it's boring, frustrating, and unproductive in terms of actually walking. Yes, you will feel like a dork as you stand there playing statue while your dog leans on the leash and makes noises like a broken teakettle. It gets better as the dog figures out the rules.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would never put collar on a toy for walking. It can cause damage to their necks, especially if they pull. We always have collars on the girls (super loose) just in case one were to get out. But for walks it’s always the harnesses. My girls liked the step in harnesses.
Hello!! Okay. My puppy too wears collar at home. So we can know where he goes from the bell.
thank youuu:giggle:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You should not use a collar on small dogs. Poodles have small necks, you could easily cause damage. A pug or Boston terrier, maybe. But not a poodle.
Hello!! Thank you for letting me know:giggle:
No more collar leash from now on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I agree with the others—no collar. A collapsing trachea is tough to deal with, much more so than pulling :(. And a harness is much less likely to slip off and/or break.

I have a dog (JRT mix) that used to pull pretty hard, much like you are describing. She would work herself into a mess, barking and yanking and running around like a lunatic. What I ended up doing was:

Worked on her leash skills inside first. This was a neutral environment that wouldn’t excite her.
Starting out walks by taking her out in the front yard and making her heel nicely, then going back inside. We slowly worked up to different areas of the neighborhood as she showed me she could handle it.
Taking her on more frequent, longer walks, while also working on her leash skills inside.
Getting her energy out in different ways, such as chasing toys inside.

She still pulls, as I’m still working with her, and getting her to heel when a squirrel is nearby is out of the question 😂 but she has improved. When Fluffy, our toy poodle, started to pull a little, I did the same thing, and he generally has no issues.

An extra point I need to make, however—we did not see improvement overnight. We’ve been working on this for the past year now, as I can find time with college and work. You might have faster results, since he is a puppy and you likely have more time than I do.

I really recommend you look up Zak George, he does a better job at explaining these things than I do. This is a good video.
Hello!! Thank you. I will do what you did. Hope it works. At least where he doesn’t pull as intensely.
and i love Zak George too!! I watched a couple of his videos. But seems like it doesn’t really worked on my pup hahaha i tried to use his method for sit training. My pup was too excited he couldn’t contain himself 😂 Victoria Stilwell’s sit method works better on him.
i think first I’ll train him on what clicker is. When he understands clicker, we’ll do walk training.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is going to be a very long process for you. Choose a positive reinforcement training method and stick with it. As already mentioned, it could be a year or more before you see consistent results. Some days will be good. Some will be bad. But no, I do not ever recommend using a collar for leash training such a small dog. The damage can be devastating.

One tip you can start applying right now, while you decide on which professional's method you're going to use: Tension means no forward movement. None. Ever. Every single time you take a step forward with a tight leash, you're teaching puppy that pulling works. In fact, you're teaching them to pull HARDER for faster results. So now you're going to have to undo that learned behaviour.

The good news is that puppy is still very young. So if you apply that rule immediately, you should start seeing some positive progress (keeping in mind that every new environment will likely require a return to basics and lots of patience).
Hello! Thank you.
Thanks for your tips. Will apply it from now :giggle:
 

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Hello! Thank you.
Thanks for your tips. Will apply it from now :giggle:
Good luck! It's so hard to be consistent.

When Peggy's going to play with her friends, for example, they all start yanking excitedly towards one another. We start out each time with the best intentions and renewed motivation....and then quickly give up.

Bad humans! Lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Once the dog gets into the habit of pulling it doesn't much matter what kind of restraint you use: the dog will pull. I wasn't as good as I should have been about discouraging Pogo from pulling when he was young. When he got worse I put him into a front clip harness. He merely learned how to pull while jumping backwards. Stupid human!

What you need to do is convince your pup that pulling is completely unrewarded. Stop moving when there is tension on the leash. By tension, I mean the leash forms a straight line between you and the ring on the dog's harness. There should always be a bit of a dip, not a straight line. As soon as the slack is gone and you can't see the dip anymore, stop walking.

Stand there until your dog looks over his shoulder to see what your problem is. When he looks, he will probably shift his body just a little bit. This shift will probably introduce just a tiny bit of slack in the leash. Reward it by stepping forward. Keep stepping until the dog lunges forward and hits the end of the leash. You will probably make it about four or five feet before you lose the slack and need to stop. Wait for the dog to give you slack again. Lather, rinse, repeat for as long as it takes. One of my friends said it took him a solid month to get his terrier puppy to stop pulling via this method.

Yes, it's boring, frustrating, and unproductive in terms of actually walking. Yes, you will feel like a dork as you stand there playing statue while your dog leans on the leash and makes noises like a broken teakettle. It gets better as the dog figures out the rules.
Hello!! Hahaahhaa i’m so dead when your doggo learned to pull while jumping backwards.
And yes !! It was soooo weird when i stood there doing nothing. Couldn’t help but keep thinking my neighbours must have thought I’ve been quarantined for too long and lost my mind. We’ll do walks again when i introduced him to clicker. Hoping when i clicks he will give me his attention lol
 

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Hoping when i clicks he will give me his attention lol
In this case, you would click WHEN he looks at you. Make sense? The click is to signal that you're rewarding good behaviour, not to get his attention.

So puppy looks at you.
Click.
Treat.

Do some research before starting clicker training, if you haven't already. I've found it super helpful, but I'm still not coordinated enough to do it while walking and feeding treats. I don't know how people do that so well!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Good luck! It's so hard to be consistent.

When Peggy's going to play with her friends, for example, they all start yanking excitedly towards one another. We start out each time with the best intentions and renewed motivation....and then quickly give up.

Bad humans! Lol.
Hahahahahhaa !! I do the same when he just won’t listens. I always gave up too quickly.
Last time i trained him to not be so excited over snacks. Because whenever i take out treats, he will jumps and barks. Even when we eat. (Yes, our fault lol i gave him chicken when i was eating once and he caught up on the bad behaviour)
He kept on barking, jumping and scratches my hands at first. Till my arms are full of his scratches. I kept on ignoring him. And just stare at him until he do what i want. I almost gave up at first lol
It took us i think a solid 30 minutes or so for him to understand no calming down = no treats. He now sit when he sees treats. He still jumps and barks sometimes. But when i see no sitting down and good calm, not going to reward him.
and boy, it sure is satisfying.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
In this case, you would click WHEN he looks at you. Make sense? The click is to signal that you're rewarding good behaviour, not to get his attention.

So puppy looks at you.
Click.
Treat.

Do some research before starting clicker training, if you haven't already. I've found it super helpful, but I'm still not coordinated enough to do it while walking and feeding treats. I don't know how people do that so well!
ooh! Okay!! Yes! I understand.
i watched one of Zak George’s video where he taught a dog how to sit and other tricks using clicker.
And I’m definitely going to watch more videos about it.
I hope it will works on me lol
Oh! Do you use that bag trainers tie on their waist for treats ? I wonder if i should get one..
 

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it sure is satisfying.
It really is so satisfying. And poodles are so smart. As long as we consistently and clearly communicate our expectations, they catch on quickly.

When Peggy was small, she tried barking to come in from the backyard. I waited until she was quiet and then opened the door.

She's never barked to come inside again!

That was an easy one, but a good reminder of what's possible.
 

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ooh! Okay!! Yes! I understand.
i watched one of Zak George’s video where he taught a dog how to sit and other tricks using clicker.
And I’m definitely going to watch more videos about it.
I hope it will works on me lol
Oh! Do you use that bag trainers tie on their waist for treats ? I wonder if i should get one..
Do some reading, too. Even good videos like Zak's don't necessarily break down the steps, which can be confusing. You want to understand exactly when and why you click, not just try to figure it out by watching.

Whole Dog Journal is a good online resource:


And yep - my husband and I each have a treat pouch. Very useful for training. If I don't have a pouch on me, I try to make sure I've got treats in my pockets. Every moment is teachable! And I especially want to make sure I've got treats in case something scary happens....like a big growly truck going by!
 
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