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Fenris (spoo), Sushi (old grumpy cat)
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Discussion Starter #1
So in a lot of sources (and from my breeder) I heard suggestions to sleep in the same room as your pup('s crate). Was planning on doing that. Then I started talking to a trainer and she suggests to not crate in the bedroom since my nighttime activity and movement could wake the pup. She suggests a baby monitor to hear the pup and camera to be able to check on him. But to let him rest. She also suggests not waking the pup up for nighttime pee (like I have seen recommended online in various places) but to wake up periodically (benefit of being in another room is setting up an alarm that will wake me and not the pup - silent alarm do not wake me, I'm a pretty heavy sleeper) and check on pup. Only take him out when you see signs of him stirring.

So my lovely poodle people, with Fenris coming home tomorrow, should I follow my trainer's advice, do what's suggested online, or look for a completely new trainer (she is CCPDT certified, or claims to be)? Just from a search here, it seems that most posts refer to crate in bedrooms but I couldn't find a specific discussion on this, but if I missed one, please link me. Thanks!!
 

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I’ve had many puppies crated in my bedroom. I disagree with your trainer. On the contrary, the puppy will feel more secure with you around and might even sleep more and better. He will quickly adjust to whatever night routine you have and sleep through it.
 

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We just went through this early stage with Oona! We had a little crate in our bedroom (her full size metal crate would not have fit in our small room) and I never woke her up to take her out but I did take her out once or twice on the first few nights when I would hear her stir next to me (though I am a light sleeper). After about a week she started to get a bit big to seem comfortable in the little crate, plus we had to carry her down our stairs to go out at night and first thing in the morning, so she transitioned onto the main floor in the larger crate with a divider at about 9.5 weeks. She only had one accident in her crate and it was when she had a UTI two weeks ago. I slept on the couch for the first two nights and after that just stayed in the room for a few minutes until she fell asleep and snuck upstairs. Since about 12 weeks I've been able to crate her and go up to bed she just goes to sleep.

I feel like this kind of thing shouldn't be a dealbreaker with a trainer, who should be able to handle clients making different choices based on their own needs about minor things like this (it's not like it totally goes against her training philosophy or anything). If you otherwise like her, and she can deal with the fact that you've made a different choice, then maybe you can keep going with her. On the other hand, if she seems really inflexible and doesn't handle well you going against her advice, I'd consider finding someone else.
 

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Imagine you’re a puppy who has never been alone. Where do you want me to put your crate?

Sometimes I think trainers get a little intensely strict. I bet border collies love that. Personally, I put my mini poodle’s crate on a table so close to my bed we could both fall asleep with my fingers touching her through the door. We progressively moved closer to being potty trained and sleeping through the night from that starting point. It worked out great for us, and was as rapid as canine development charts indicate.
 

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All four of our dogs sleep in our bedroom. The two young dogs (mini poo and Lab) are crated; the two old dogs (whippet/border collie and Chihuahua) are not crated. The reason the young dogs are crated is because they would prefer to sleep in the bed with us! The whippet/border collie used to sleep on the bed, but he is now too old to jump up there, so he has a thick mattress on the floor next to me. The Chihuahua has a little bed at the foot of our bed.
 

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Fenris (spoo), Sushi (old grumpy cat)
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all for your advice! The original plan was to give up my bedroom to the cat and sleep in my office with the pup, at least for some time. Then the trainer brought up the other plan. I don't think she's inflexible about it. After talking, we discussed how I have trouble falling asleep and read before bed but then I sleep like the dead once I'm asleep (and so I was thinking I should set an alarm at least the first few nights to check on him). I was hoping to eventually move him into my bedroom (and my bed once he was old enough, I have no issues sharing a bed with a giant spoo) once the cat didn't need his safe space anymore. My choice originally of keeping the pup in my office was so that I can work from home during the day and still have him around me. If I had given up the office as cat safe space, then I would have had to crate the pup in another room during work hours (and that just seemed like a huge no). But I guess I'll sleep for a few nights with him in the office and test it out. Then use her plan as back-up in case we can't get enough rest as is. I really appreciate everyone's advice!

By the way, Oonapup, Fenris will be almost 9.5 weeks when he comes home, he already weights 14 lbs (more than the 11.5 lbs my cat does). I only have a giant crate with a divider.

By the way, funny thing, my cat has been loving the crate. I've left the door open so he could explore the new environment and he's been just hanging out in there every single day. I think this has made me feel better about crating the pup in general, knowing that the kitty finds it comforting and safe.
 

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We've crated our girls and our boys in the bedroom with us. My sleep may have been disrupted while they were quite young, but I also felt better knowing that I could almost instantly know if they were unwell or needed to go out. I'm sure they slept better, knowing they weren't completely alone, even if absolutely nothing was familiar to them until they settled into our family.

It also helped us all, when they were much older, and needed help occasionally during the night.

I also felt better during the interim years knowing exactly where they were if there were other types of emergencies.

It's a bit 11th hour for these, but if you didn't get these links previously, they're still good to look thru, and the first at least is a quick read:

Dr. Ian Dunbar (born April 15, 1947) is a veterinarian, animal behaviorist, and dog trainer who received his veterinary degree and a Special Honors degree in Physiology & Biochemistry from the Royal Veterinary College (London University) plus a doctorate in animal behavior from the Psychology Department at UC Berkeley, where he researched the development of social hierarchies and aggression in domestic dogs.

He has authored numerous books and DVDs about puppy/dog behavior and training, including AFTER You Get Your Puppy, How To Teach A New Dog Old Tricks and the SIRIUS® Puppy Training video.

https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/BEFORE You Get Your Puppy.pdf


https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/downloads/AFTER_You_Get_Your_Puppy.pdf
 

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I think it depends on the pup. Bb is fine crated in our room. Noodle woke up and had to pee every time we did. It wasn’t great. When we moved him to another room, we all slept better. Maybe start in your room and see how it goes?
 

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This is very much about personal preference and also about accommodating (within reason) your particular puppy's unique needs.

Unlike my last two puppies, Peggy was (and continues to be) crated in the main living area at night. And she is absolutely fine with that. My husband initially slept next to the crate on a camping cot. I think that initial proximity is a good idea, as it gives you some insight into your puppy's sleep habits. It's also a nice way to ease puppy into life away from their litter mates.

Peggy has also always gone to bed before us, so from day 1 she was used to snoozing through things like TV and getting-ready-for-bed sounds. I use a lightweight black blanket over her crate (open only on the side facing the wall) so that light doesn't interrupt her sleep hormones. But otherwise we make no special accommodations. It's important to me she be able to stay settled even when there's activity outside her crate.

One thing I really disagree with your trainer on is not waking up puppy for midnight potty. Until you know what your puppy is comfortable with, that's just asking for accidents in the crate (extremely upsetting for dogs) or a puppy that learns to bark to get attention. It's also going to affect the quality of your sleep, as you'll be on edge listening for stirring.
 

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Fenris (spoo), Sushi (old grumpy cat)
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for more of the advice. Yes, I've read the Ian Dunbar book (I bought it on kindle a few weeks ago and then I found those links). I just didn't know if my trainer had some new insight or if she just wasn't what she claimed to be. I think I'll do as suggested, sleep with him in the office at first and then feel him out as he gets comfortable.

And as for last minute stress, my kitty (baby) gate broke today! I just installed it a few days ago. So I'm getting Fenris tomorrow and no kitty gate. On top of it, tropical storm may be coming our way so that should put an awesome spin on potty training. Best laid plans and all... but the countdown is on... less than 10 hours to puppy!
 

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I don't crate in the bedroom, I keep the crate in my kitchen area. The first week though one of us has always slept nearby so we could hear if they whine and move around, thats when we would take them out. However we usually sat on the floor next to the crate for the first hour while the pup fell asleep. I always felt it was good for a puppy to learn right off its OK to be alone. Now all the being said our latest puppy is a shih tzu and came to us at 2.1 lbs. ZMy daughter read all the new literature and she place him in a crate next to her bed, he hated it and it was annoying . We did put him in a big pen, its bout 3 ft wide and 6 ft long. He also was sick...so we put his bed on one end then his water, (I always have water accessible (though many take it away at a certain time while housebreaking) and we put p pads on the other end. He would get up during the night use the p pad then just go back to his bed. Nice no sleep deprivation for my daughter which was good since she had to work. He will cry more than our past dogs when she leaves the room but has learned it does no good. So he has not used the p pad during the night in about 2 weeks. He prefers to tear them to pieces so we just took them away. There are times he will use one if its available for pee not so often anymore and if I take them away he just holds it till I take him out. He is now 18 weeks and two weeks ago ws 4.6 lbs so I'm thinking he has reached 5 lbs now. Now for us training will be more of a challenge I think, he wants to eat every leaf, stick, rabbit poo, grass blade, flower on his outdoor journeys , much easier to redirect on a big dog. You will find what works for you, just be consistent. Good luck and I'm looking forward to seeing photos and hearing all about your pup.
 

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So exciting! I hope you and Fenris are having a wonderful time getting to know each other.

I made a critical mistake. I meant to crate train Sammy to sleep in my bedroom. That first night ( we got home kind of late) he howled/cried/threw his little body against the crate so hard, I took him out and slept with him in my bed. He has been there ever since. Unfortunately, he still has an extreme reaction to the crate ( which makes travelling difficult).
 
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