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When we go out in public and she sees people, she starts pulling and tangling in her harness. I'll ask people if she can say hi and warn she jumps and licks (and pees) so I dont take her in stores.. When she says hi she starts freaking out and wont stop greeting them, will run and jump on me and in circles crazily. Deff overexcited, scared at first, hesitant, submissive, then very very loving and friendly and funny. To start I've been taking her to parks where she sees people but is far enough where I can still distract her and she doesnt freak out. We live in a very, very secluded area. Her car sickness prevented more frequent social opportunities as any drive is down a mountain and at least 40 min away from civilization. Shes almost 5 months in a week and I'm not sure if the breeder socialized her as I got her towards the end of that period. I'm not going to dwell and will do anything I can to socialize her and make her feel safe and controlled now in baby steps.
 

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Hi! This is currently our #1 challenge and Peggy has been well-socialized since coming home with us at 9 weeks. So don't be alarmed ?

Your puppy is a spoo? They can be *very* bouncy dogs—verrrry comfortable occupying vertical space.

Also, jumping up, trying to reach a human face, is a common canine appeasement gesture. It means "I mean you no harm!!" So while it looks like happiness, it can also be related to insecurity. Working on your pup's overall confidence will help.

We work weekly with a trainer and do frequent (short) training walks in places like our Walmart or Home Depot parking lot, using treats to practice loose leash walking and redirect attention. If we employ this technique early enough, we're often successful at getting her to walk past strangers without lunging. But if we miss that window, it's hard to compete with her excitement.

My favourite online resources are Ian Dunbar/Dog Star Daily, KikoPup, Sophia Yin, and Zak George. But few things compare to the benefits of even just a few real-life sessions with an excellent positive reinforcement trainer.
 

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One piece I would have that Norman's trainer gave, for his extensive jumping, is to "park" him. When he meets someone new, especially someone elderly or a kid, I cannot have a 60 pound dog jumping on them. I have him meet them with my foot on his leash to where he can stand, but not jump. He has a front lead harness so it makes him still mobile and able to sit/stand/ look around, just not jump.

With a nine month old who is so strong and so heavy, I use "parking" him as a go to for meeting strangers. I will say that Norman use to have the same reactions to certain people when he was young (tall men especially). Apprehensive, slow to walk to them, and look at me for reassurance. After they met he would go NUTS and sometimes pee. To this day when he sees me come homes he will dribble pee from happiness and excitement.
From my personal experience, this apprehension went away when Norman became more confident in his surrounding and it got better when I read his body language!!! Dogs will tell you how they feel in a situation by their facial expressions (licking lips) and by body language (frozen, tail tuck, pee, etc). These must be read by us to understand how to best help them in the situation.
When Norman looked excited to meet someone, but had some apprehension to go to them, I would encourage them and say "see, this is happy!" and thats what I still use to this day to let him know the person or thing is not bad to be around. He got scared a week or so ago at a chair that fell in the kitchen and wouldn't walk to it until I touched it and said "look this is happy!! yay happy!!" and then he would approach. Giving your dog positive cues can help their confidence in a situation.

On the other hand, its ok to say no to people meeting your pup!! I had to learn this the hard way. I am a people pleaser so I would let Norman meet any and everyone who wanted to. After a while I was tired of feeling guilty for Norman showing me signs of stress or fear or discomfort. After I learned my lesson, I now say no to people. Letting me and Norman know that we do not have to meet the whole world!! Norman's comfort comes first.

As for the peeing, this will get better with age. But Norman now at 9 month old still sometimes pees a few drops when hes excited, happens weekly!

I wish you luck!! I am sure your pup is just needing a bit more confidence with strangers! She will get there. Just be confident with her, read her body language, and make the appropriate adjustments for her based on her body cues she gives you. Hope this may give you some ideas!!
 

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And don't scold!! Will only heighten anxiety and intensify the unwanted behaviour. I see it daily, just out and about, folks hollering at their dogs and/or yanking on the leash.

What's funny to me is it NEVER works, and yet people continue to do it.

(Confession: I'm guilty of this sort of thing, too, sometimes. I think we all are.)

Our trainer told us about an experience she recently had at a grocery store, where a woman was *yelling* at her crying baby. It was so absurd (and so sad) and yet it's very similar to how dogs get treated every day.
 

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I was once in a K-Mart watching a woman teaching her child to have tantrums. We were waiting in the checkout line which is lined with candy and every time the child asked nicely the woman scolded him until he finally started screeching and then she grabbed what he wanted and gave it to him. I considered explaining things to her, but didn't think she would appreciate that my experience came from training dogs. :aetsch:
 

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I was once in a K-Mart watching a woman teaching her child to have tantrums. We were waiting in the checkout line which is lined with candy and every time the child asked nicely the woman scolded him until he finally started screeching and then she grabbed what he wanted and gave it to him. I considered explaining things to her, but didn't think she would appreciate that my experience came from training dogs.
Haha! Classic.

I guess it's easy to say no when someone's asking politely, whether it be a human or a dog. But easy isn't always the best course of action.
 

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I would not allow her to greet anyone if she cannot behave. My guy ha learned and still is learning from time to time, that if he jumps and gets overly excited when seeing someone, they turn away from him and just ignore him completely. He now sits and he knows when he does he will get attention and a pet, but the moment he starts up, nothing...we treat him like he doesn't exit.
 

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Working on this as well and it’s been hard. Usually when people come home or if we meet someone on the street, he goes crazy. On a walk, he’s fine, no lunging or anything we usually walk and create some distance between us and the person passing by. It’s when someone stops and wants to greet or pet him, he gets way over excited. At 9 months he will jump and still gently nibble and nip at the hands of a stranger. Usually I restrain and decline people who ask to pet.
 

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I have him meet them with my foot on his leash to where he can stand, but not jump. He has a front lead harness so it makes him still mobile and able to sit/stand/ look around, just not jump.
I really like this technique. I use it a fair bit with my mini mutt.
 

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Working on this as well and it’s been hard. Usually when people come home or if we meet someone on the street, he goes crazy. On a walk, he’s fine, no lunging or anything we usually walk and create some distance between us and the person passing by. It’s when someone stops and wants to greet or pet him, he gets way over excited. At 9 months he will jump and still gently nibble and nip at the hands of a stranger. Usually I restrain and decline people who ask to pet.
9 months? Eek! Was so hoping this was something Peggy would grow out of. The jumping is bad, but the nipping is going to get us into trouble if she damages someone's clothes.
 

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9 months? Eek! Was so hoping this was something Peggy would grow out of. The jumping is bad, but the nipping is going to get us into trouble if she damages someone's clothes.
Yeah, still there but hey, I’m probably not consistent enough. Hoping someone has advice and can chime in.
 
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