Poodle Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I’m getting a standard poodle pup in a few months and I’m so excited! I’m raising him/her for a guide dog organization, and I’m just finishing raising a lovely little golden retriever. I’m sad to see her go, but excited about getting a new puppy to raise!
So, I was just wondering if you all have any poodle specific advice for me. I think I’m mostly well versed in terms of training and socialization unless poodles need something different than a golden would. I’ve been told poodles are ‘wicked smart’, so I’ll definitely be doing some more training than with my golden who was admittedly a little slow.
Another thing I assume will come up is grooming, I’ve heard to start them young to get them used to it and plan on doing that. What types of grooming supplies should I buy? Do they need to be bathed more or less often since they have hair, not fur?
Really just any advice would be appreciated, I’m so excited to start my first little poodle adventure! I’ll try to post a picture of the pup as soon as I get one :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,708 Posts
How exciting - I very much look forward to hearing about your experiences, and the pros and cons of a poodle as a guide dog.

You are absolutely right about both the intelligence and the grooming. Poodles need to be accustomed to grooming early, with short, frequent sessions to start with. Most good breeders will have already clipped face, feet and tail several times before the pups go to their new homes, to begin to get them used to it. Many of us learn to groom our own poodles, but as yours is likely to be with you for a limited time you may not want to invest in all the equipment needed for a full groom (dryer, table, clippers, scissors, etc) - I would ask around for good groomers and make regular appointments. Brushes and combs are essential for keeping the coat tangle and mat free, of course. Baby fluff is adorable, but a short retriever or German clip may be more appropriate for your pup's role as he or she grows older, and is much easier to care for.

The intelligence can be a bit of a double edged sword. Poodles can learn very fast (both what you intend to teach and what you don't...), but they can also be easily bored. Repetitive drilling is a turn off for many poodles, who tend to assume that they must have misunderstood if you keep asking for the same thing over and over again.

But in most ways poodles are like other pups - peeing, pooing, needle teeth, soaking up experiences like a sponge, needing love, play, direction, and generally turning life upside down, while bringing much joy. I have huge admiration for your being prepared to go through all those puppy months and then let someone else benefit from all the work you have put in - true altruism!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,776 Posts
I think its quite cool and selfless to raise guide dogs. I had a friend to who did for many years before I actually even met her. She actually got one of her guide dogs back (who was by far her fav) in her late years when the dog was retired. I too would probably not do the home groom as save on equipment plus I think the dog will need to be accustomed to going to the groomers, as I presume her eventual home will require her to do so. St poodles are very smart and thrive on exercise & mental activity. They are very very active when young and many of us don't see solid results in our obedience training until they are 2. (at least that was the case for me and several of my friends). You may find it more difficult than training a golden but once they settle down and you haven't given up they are remarkable. Good luck and I hope you will stick around and let us benefit from the journey.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,582 Posts
I totally agree with the excellent comments from fjm and Mufar. The two things I see as important to reemphasize are teaching good grooming, but probably at a groom shop since I suspect if your pup passed through that is how grooming will happen for her. Also really key you can't drill a poodle. For my girl if I did too many repeats of something (like think more than 3-5 times) she decides she is wrong, that I am really trying to get her to do something else and offers something else to see if that new behavior is what I want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I am still learning myself, but just wanted to say I am so impressed that you will be training a poodle for this job. I would imagine many people have allergies, so a poodle is one of their only chances for a guide dog. Most be so rewarding and also so much work. And of course hard to say goodbye.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,798 Posts
Since you have already raised a Golden I am sure you know about exposing the pup to "strange things".I think this is especially important for poodles because they are so smart that they are quick to realize something is different, and you do not want them to get in the habit of over-reacting. You will need to make sure (I know in these times!!)the pup is exposed to people of varied ethnicities/races, age groups (from infant to Seniors), people in uniforms. Also, exposure to lots of vehicles that make noise...garbage trucks, air brakes, buses, motorcycles. Don't forget to get the pup used to skateboarders, bicyclists, strollers, and wheelchairs. Good luck to you.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top