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Discussion Starter #1
I have finally managed to jury rig my Springer to my current bike, and start Annie off with it. It will be a while, she still hates it.. I have her on a long leash as I walk the bike, and yesterday had someone else walk her while I biked. I socialized her to people biking past as a puppy, but I guess that's very different to asking her to hang out near the wheels!!! Plus, it's too hot for a longer expedition right now.

I realized yesterday I am going to have a challenge limiting my biking to spoo speed... last time I did this was with a collie cross accustomed to taking off into the forest for 2-8 hrs at a time, i biked on a gravel road, and, more to the point - I was a significantly worse biker, on a significantly less nice bike.

Any tips for how to limit yourself to dog speed, or just general tips for biking with dogs I might not consider?
 

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I go biking with my dogs- not too often but we do. Lol I can't keep up with Raffi, and he has more stamina than I do as well! He is fast! But I am probably more like your old self- not a great bike, and I am only a casual biker.
My other dog trots beside me at an easy pace (think relaxing biking but not that slow). I just have a different mind set when I take her out. If I want a relaxing, shorter ride I take her, if I want actual exercise I take Raffi.
I still just hold the leash in my hand. I feel like I have much better control that way. I'm just too nervous to attach my dog to my bike, but I think it's an easier introduction for the dogs that way too. I can leave the leash a bit longer if they don't want to be as close, and direct them with the leash if necessary as well.
One thing that I do think helped is that we started biking in a very quiet area that they are very familiar with- so the bike was the only 'new' thing to deal with.
And at least for Raffi, when we started he was much better at faster speeds than walking pace. I think he was too busy running to pay attention to the bike.
Oh, and you have probably thought of this, but make sure you consider the footing. Where I go, I am on paved ground but at the edge so that the dogs can run on the fine gravel or short grass. You don't want to add hot or otherwise uncomfortable surfaces to Annie's list of grievances about this activity lol.
 

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I have biked with two dogs including Misha and with both I really just hooked them up and went really slow at first. One day I walk the bike with them attached, and the next I ride it slowly, then I start picking up speed. It was remarkable how quickly they learned it. The first one was even afraid of bikes she saw while we walked, so I was surprised she had no problem being attached to one. I've always used a short attachment to the spring so it keeps the dog right next to me. That way I can easily control their movements because they are right next to me. Over time they get better at adjusting their speed to yours and you won't need to go so slow. They also take some time to learn that they can't try to put on the brakes whenever there's a squirrel or bird. But they learn.
 

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I have biked with two dogs, including my current Evie. I always start with just putting my bike in the yard and letting them smell and get used to the bike and reward them when they are next to it. I then clip my attachment to them on the harness and walk with them not attached to the bike. (I have a attachment that also works as a leash so it may be different than yours.) Then I clip them to the bike and just walk the bike with them attached rewarding. After that just barely riding until they get the hang of it. Then slowly increase the speed. They learn how to behave while riding. I do suggest always also having a leash attached to the collar and the attachment to the harness, that way if the harness were to come off the dog would still be under your control. Also use the leash for directions. Evie has gotten quite fast, although I still ride much faster than her when I am not riding with her.

I hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She is starting to tolerate biking. I have been taking her on the evening walk with mom and trixie. We bike ahead, then stop and wait. Then we bike ahead.... etc. She has learnt the command "Let's go!" (We use it walking too) and i am trying to teach "halt!". She even gave me a doggy grin while we picked up speed for the last of our last try, I think she is finally figuring put this means we can travel at her speed, not mine. Still wants to sniff though, and it is so hot and humid here that longer runs arent a good idea. Definitely keeping her on the grass or gravel, when she gets more confident, I think I will take her to nearby gravel road for a longer run.

I have had her on a relatively long leash attached to the springer to let her get used to being near the bike. The springer is this giant u shaped metal thing with a strong spring that keeps her in position and keeps from transferring force to the bike. I attach that to her back harness ring, and a leash to the front harness ring held in my hand to keep her facing forwards I need to shorten the springer leash and stop using the front leash- sudden pulls towards squirrels are scary as they twist my handlebars towards her, and I think she has figured out the "must walk forward" part.

I have no idea how people bike without an attachment. Love my springer, even when we began and she was pulling full force away from me as we walked the bike, I barely felt it as I guided the bike with one hand. Plus, no risk of her taking off in front of my tires or feet.

I might need to buy a different harness. Bought this one during COVID without trying it on, no returns, after losing her last one and I dislike how it twists and fits her under force.

Pacing will definitely be a challenge. It's very hilly here, so i typically would coast down the hill, pedalling on a relatively high gear, switching into an easier gear halfway up the hill if needed (rarely unless the hill is huge or I screw up timing it). With the dog, I have to brake down the hill, and dont have enough speed to maintain the harder gear up the hill without over stressing my knees, so i find myself spinning ineffectually crawling up the hill. I do have to be careful, I found myself going too fast for her to keep up a few times downhill. I cycle commuted 16-20 km/day for a while in heavy GTA traffic on a road bike so "slow" and "relaxed" arent really biking speeds I have muscle memory for, though I am far less in shape than I was then!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yup! That one.

If you want to buy one- could you send me a picture of your bike? It would suck if it arrived and didnt work, and it doesnt work well for mine. Or- if your seat post is like 8" tall, it should work. 6" might work too, but I dont have it with me right now so I cant measure.
 

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I use a Walky Dog which is half the price of that if you're wanting a cheaper option. In addition, I appreciate that I can easily unattach the walky dog to make the bike easier to store. I don't know how hard it is to do this with the other models. Walky dog has springs inside of it that absorb shock, but I can't compare it with other models in terms of what works best with big dogs.
 
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