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Hello Everyone! I would love to hear from owners of Tiny Toy poodles on their experiences with their little ones as compared to an in size/oversized toy. I ask because I am bringing home a toy next week from a great breeder. She has been around for a long time and I trust her and the quality of her dogs but turns out my little girl is tracking to be quite small. This breeder does NOT purposefully breed or even use the word teacup..in fact the sire and dam of my little girl are both around 7 lbs, the sire even being a bit taller than an in size poodle. All that to say, I was expecting and preparing for an in size, 5-7 lb dog and may be lucky if she gets up to 4 lbs (current at 1.2 lbs at 7 weeks). Perhaps I am overreacting as she may grow to be bigger as there is really no way of knowing. All that to say, I'd love any insight, feedback, advice, as to caring for a tiny dog! I am used to a 9 lb toy poodle that my family has and not sure how different life with a little one might be. Anyway...thanks for reading my rambling haha!
 

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Well I'm not a toy poodle person but I think you will just need to be very careful where you keep the little one as she grows. Presently we have a 2.2 lbs shih tzu now up to 2.8 lbs and finally growing. We can't walk around with him loose on the floor as he is fast and under your feet. My daughter keeps him in a large playpen now at nigh; t for awhile she was letting him sleep near her bed on a pillow since he was so good about using his pp pads but she said she almost stepped on him as he crawled partly under his pillow so now unless actively playing with him he goes in his playpen. Also keep nautical on hand as if he doesn't eat enough his sugar could drop drastically low. Other than that thats about all I know of the littles but lots here have toys so I'm sure they will be of help to you.
 

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Well an exprienced breeder will be better at determining the adult size but my mum has a yorkie who was the runt of the litter and he grew up to be oversized at 4.5 kg.

You would be surprised at how strong these little ones are, ive known a papillon who goes hiking in the snow. I dont think there is a huge difference between the smaller sized and the in-sized as long as, like you said, the smallness was not the intention of the breeding but rather an accident. If the overall quality of the breeding is good then you should be in the clear. You are not intending to breed yourself right?? This is just a pet dog?

The only small dog problems I can think of also apply to in-sized and over sized toys, in fact I will have to keep these things in mind when I get my miniature puppy. Such as challenges with potty training, socialisation with bigger dogs (both essential and scary) building confidence when the world is big and scary, preventing jumping off furniture and hypoglycemia (did I spell that right??).
 

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That sounds like a very normal sized toy poodle puppy they are tiny. The growth charts they have out on the web are horse hockey, if that were true all my pups would have been so much smaller.
Your pup will more than likely end up the size of it's parents.
But an 8 week old toy puppy is very tiny and as others have stated remember they are delicate and prone to hypoglycemia, a lot if good breeders send them home at 10 plus weeks due to their smaller size.

My mom's 1 pound 8 week old pomeranian puppy grew to 7 pounds
 

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I have no direct experience with toys, but from what I've learned here, it sounds like the breeder should be keeping your little girl for another few weeks. Is this something your breeder has suggested?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have no direct experience with toys, but from what I've learned here, it sounds like the breeder should be keeping your little girl for another few weeks. Is this something your breeder has suggested?
The breeder is comfortable with letting her go home if she is eating well, which she is on track for by 9 weeks. While I am from out of town, I am staying with family very close to the breeder for about a month or so- at any time I can bring her to the breeder in that period to be with mom, etc. I did want to bring her home around 9 weeks to start training/acclimating her to a routine with me before she gets on a plane to fly across the country. Hoping my plan works haha
 

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That sounds like a very normal sized toy poodle puppy they are tiny. The growth charts they have out on the web are horse hockey, if that were true all my pups would have been so much smaller.
Your pup will more than likely end up the size of it's parents.
But an 8 week old toy puppy is very tiny and as others have stated remember they are delicate and prone to hypoglycemia, a lot if good breeders send them home at 10 plus weeks due to their smaller size.

My mom's 1 pound 8 week old pomeranian puppy grew to 7 pounds
Thank you for this feedback! That really helps to know the charts are not quite accurate which the breeder also mentioned!
 

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The breeder is comfortable with letting her go home if she is eating well, which she is on track for by 9 weeks. While I am from out of town, I am staying with family very close to the breeder for about a month or so- at any time I can bring her to the breeder in that period to be with mom, etc. I did want to bring her home around 9 weeks to start training/acclimating her to a routine with me before she gets on a plane to fly across the country. Hoping my plan works haha
That sounds like a good way to establish a bond before the stress of flying. I think fragility/hypoglycemia is the primary concern at such a young age, but it sounds like you'll have good support.

I'm getting itchy for pictures now! I can't imagine having such a tiny baby. She's going to melt your heart.
 

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A 4-5 pound toy poodle is not tiny, it’s a normal weight for the breed.

You need to take the same precautions as with any small dog as far as health and security are concerned, and make sure your little one eats well. You’ve had good infos to read about hypoglycemia; I think you’ll be fine !
 

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Hi there! My Toby was a tiny toy poodle (who passed away earlier this year after a long, healthy life). He never weighed more than 3.5lbs his entire life but he never let his small size stop him from doing whatever pleased him! As others have mentioned, making sure the little ones eat is very important. Toby was never super food motivated or picky most of his life but one of our biggest struggles with him was getting him to eat in his senior years. He was very delicate with small, thin bones but had no problems jumping on/off furniture - which I regretted letting him do in his younger years once he got older and developed joint problems. I would highly recommend training your tiny toy to use stairs to get on/off furniture, even if they physically can jump on/off. Though they are more resilient than they seem (as Toby once jumped under a bag being pulled down stairs with no ill effects other than an ear piercing yelp). I also had to find the right groomer for him as many groomers struggled with his small size (and often nicked him). We also struggled with his dental health his whole life. Finding a tooth brushing tool small enough for his mouth was impossible and our poor attention to his dental health resulted in multiple tooth extractions over the years.

Happy to answer any other questions you might have about teeny tiny toy poodles. They may be little but they have big personalities and leave paw prints much bigger than their size on our hearts :)

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Hi there! My Toby was a tiny toy poodle (who passed away earlier this year after a long, healthy life). He never weighed more than 3.5lbs his entire life but he never let his small size stop him from doing whatever pleased him! As others have mentioned, making sure the little ones eat is very important. Toby was never super food motivated or picky most of his life but one of our biggest struggles with him was getting him to eat in his senior years. He was very delicate with small, thin bones but had no problems jumping on/off furniture - which I regretted letting him do in his younger years once he got older and developed joint problems. I would highly recommend training your tiny toy to use stairs to get on/off furniture, even if they physically can jump on/off. Though they are more resilient than they seem (as Toby once jumped under a bag being pulled down stairs with no ill effects other than an ear piercing yelp). I also had to find the right groomer for him as many groomers struggled with his small size (and often nicked him). We also struggled with his dental health his whole life. Finding a tooth brushing tool small enough for his mouth was impossible and our poor attention to his dental health resulted in multiple tooth extractions over the years.

Happy to answer any other questions you might have about teeny tiny toy poodles. They may be little but they have big personalities and leave paw prints much bigger than their size on our hearts :)

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Oh I am so sorry for your loss but incredibly grateful you chose to share. I appreciate your insights- especially about furniture and dental hygiene. I am feeling a bit less nervous and more "sure" that my puppy is the one meant for me regardless of her size.
 

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My input is more of an oranges to clementines comparison.

My boys were bred from an oversized toy sire and smaller mini dam (long story), both under 10lbs. My smaller boy was 2.3lbs at almost 9 weeks, 9.5lbs at 7 months and 12.5lbs at full, filled out maturity.

Just take reasonable precautions, it'll be an amazing life for you all :).
 

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My neighbours have a tiny Yorkie pup at the moment - I rather worry for her safety, as she is absolutely fearless and zooms around the shared gardens and drives with or without her human siblings in hot pursuit. She is having a wonderful time and learning fast, but it is all rather a contrast to my own hyper-careful methods!

Practice the puppy shuffle - walking - round the house especially - with your feet just a little above the ground. It's something you quickly learn with kittens or small puppies around. Learn to check chairs etc before sitting down. Have a playpen ready - it will be extremely useful. Be extra scrupulous about puppy proofing your house and garden - a pup that size can squeeze into very tiny spaces. And don't let people swoop on her and pick her up - I would teach her a "May I pick you up?" cue almost before anything else. Many tiny dogs grow up grumpy because humans insist on sweeping them up into the air and hugging them!
 
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