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Hi, all, I got a beautiful female spoo puppy a few months ago. our breeder believes they should be two years old before they are spayed. Shortly after we got the dog I learned I have breast cancer--we don't know yet if it's stage 2 or 3, but I will definitely need chemo and radiation (I already had 2 surgeries). I am really worried now about the dog going into heat (she's 5 months old now) and trying to control her during that period. We have only had one dog and it was a male--he was neutered around 6 months. I want to do what's good for her health but when she's in heat I understand she can't even go play in our fenced yard unsupervised, since a dog could jump the fence, and she surely can't go to a doggy park or doggy day care. We have only the 1 dog so she doesn't get much exercise unless we're out with her. I'm so worried I won't be able to take care of her properly when she's in heat. Is it so terrible if we have her spayed before I start my chemo? I know vets have different opinions about this. Our vet said it was good for her to have 1 heat but that discussion took place before my breast cancer diagnosis. Thanks for any advice you can offer.
 

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Ask your breeder when her lines typically go into first heat. I spayed my girl at 18 months with her not having had a heat, my dogs breeder said 20-22 months was common for her dogs line. Other lines it may be as soon as 8 months. I personally would really want to wait at least a year because of the Addison's risk, but if it's going to stress you too much during chemo to worry about it I would just do the 6 mo. You can only do what you can do and the human comes first.

Hugs. A relative just went through radiation for breast cancer. Not easy on anyone. Big hugs.
 

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Obviously, you need to do what's best for you. Millions of dogs have been neutered at 6 months or so and have lived long, healthy lives.

There is a single, observational study that found a somewhat higher risk of certain orthopedic injuries In dogs neutered before puberty. The other data is more mixed. Breast cancer, a common dog cancer, is prevented by early spaying. Prostate and testicular cancers, rare cancers in dogs, are also prevented by neutering. Setting aside unplanned pregnancies, it's hard to sort out the various risks of early and late spaying, because, quite simply there isn't that much data and anyone who claims that not neutering is healthier is really not speaking from knowledge.

Most of the dogs in my life were spayed or neutered at six months and lived into old age without associated problems. My parents had a dog who was spayed at 3 or 4 after a show career and who had to take Proin for bladder leakage which is supposedly prevented by a late spay. We chose not to neuter our current dog because I wanted a smaller dog. Compared to one of his litter brothers he's really small although when we picked him, the two were identical. He also has more muscle than my neutered dogs had. OTOH, he couldn't go to dog daycare after 6 months (which he loved) and he has a lot more body odor. Since he's unlikely to encounter a dog in heat, we're getting the advantage of other people's surgery decisions.

People may disagree with me here, but I think that whatever you choose will be fine. Your dog will be a happy, healthy member of your family either way.
 

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I totally agree with @For Want of Poodle, what ever is best for you comes first!
Phoebe went into heat at roughly 11 months and it was not as difficult as I thought it would be. I have decided to spay her after her second heat which will put her at roughly 20 months.
I made a thread about my experience with Phoebe's first heat-
 

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You need to do what is best for you and think about your health. No it is not so terrible. Many dogs were spayed and neutered early over the years and did just fine. My boy is going to neutered before 8 months. It is required for dog daycare and that is just the way things are. Many dogs are still spayed and neutered early and many adoption contracts also require this. Please do not feel guilty and take care of yourself. So sorry to hear of your diagnosis.
 

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So sorry that you must have chemo - that is a rough thing to go through. Fingers crossed that works for you. As for the spaying do whenever it works for you. My spaniel had an early spay and she lived long with no problems.
 

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I agree that waiting until closer to 1 year will still avoid a heat cycle. I think you should do what's best for you. When I had a dog in heat I had no issue taking her for walks on leash and biking with her, but yes for sure no dog parks.

Obviously, you need to do what's best for you. Millions of dogs have been neutered at 6 months or so and have lived long, healthy lives.

There is a single, observational study that found a somewhat higher risk of certain orthopedic injuries In dogs neutered before puberty. The other data is more mixed. Breast cancer, a common dog cancer, is prevented by early spaying. Prostate and testicular cancers, rare cancers in dogs, are also prevented by neutering. Setting aside unplanned pregnancies, it's hard to sort out the various risks of early and late spaying, because, quite simply there isn't that much data and anyone who claims that not neutering is healthier is really not speaking from knowledge.

Most of the dogs in my life were spayed or neutered at six months and lived into old age without associated problems. My parents had a dog who was spayed at 3 or 4 after a show career and who had to take Proin for bladder leakage which is supposedly prevented by a late spay. We chose not to neuter our current dog because I wanted a smaller dog. Compared to one of his litter brothers he's really small although when we picked him, the two were identical. He also has more muscle than my neutered dogs had. OTOH, he couldn't go to dog daycare after 6 months (which he loved) and he has a lot more body odor. Since he's unlikely to encounter a dog in heat, we're getting the advantage of other people's surgery decisions.

People may disagree with me here, but I think that whatever you choose will be fine. Your dog will be a happy, healthy member of your family either way.
Jbean there have been many studies all finding similar results and many were not observational. They were empirical studies. So I find your statements grossly misleading and not based on evidence. There have been threads about this, but I would in particular direct you to read through this thread Re visiting spaying age
In that thread we go over the evidence for increased risk of mammary cancer (spoiler alert... the rate is actually extremely low) and decreased risk of different orthopedic injury and cancer.
 

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Hi,

Stage 2, grade 3, hormone neg, chemo, lumpectomy. mastectomy. chemo again, and radiation here.

No one goes down the same road thru this but I can tell you that I was up and doing normal activities most of those months. I'd taken medical leave from work so I wouldn't disrupt scheduling and to keep my stress level reduced, but otherwise, things were oddly normal.

I have to admit tho that I wasn't wrangling a young spoo. I had two adult mpoo girls that we got a few months before I was diagnosed.
 
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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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FWOP gives great advice - reach out to the breeder to find out when females typically have their first heat and what the first heat is like (keep in mind that some breeders forget what first heats are like because of all the subsequent heats they deal with). Mia's was light and she was easy to care for. Her second heat was heavier. I had her spayed at 22.5 months (exactly halfway through her 183-day cycle).

The balance of the evidence points to later spay being better in spoos, but it's not totally clear, and in any case, the decision has to be made in light of other circumstances.

When you do have her spayed, consider getting a gastropexy to prevent bloat and torsion (aka gastric dilation and volvulus).

Best wishes to you and your family. You have good support here if you need someone to talk with.
 

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Well I would do what you feel will work for you. You don't need added stress on your table. You may be fine and everything go as it normally would or you may be very tired. I'd probably go ahead and do an earlier spay other then risk and unwanted pregnancy.
 
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