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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
My miniature poodle who’s 9weeks is very timid and fearful of every little things. She always want to be close to me which I don’t mind but I want her to be more confident. Even when I take her out somewhere she would stay with me and wouldn’t eat or drink. Has anyone had issues like this with your poodle? What helped get over this?
Thanks!
 

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The world is big and a little scary now he has left behind everything he knows, your pup will adjust she is still a baby.
 

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I worked hard on socialising Poppy. The key is lots and lots of small, happy experiences, building confidence over time. But at nine weeks yours is still a very young pup, and has only recently left Mum and siblings - give her a little time to feel secure with you before expecting her to be braver about the world.
 

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I've edited your thread title for clarity. Looked like maybe it was a typo. :) Hope that encourages more people to pop in and offer their advice!

Peggy was extremely confident when we first picked her up from the breeder and then almost immediately started showing signs of stress/fear. In her case, she wasn't digesting her kibble and was malnourished. Once we got her eating properly, she was much more lively and curious.

We also met with an excellent trainer (positive reinforcement/force-free) and she assessed Peggy and placed her in an appropriate puppy class. That really helped her blossom.

Is this your first dog? When did you bring her home? It must have been very recently. Did her breeder do any early socialization?

Assuming she came from a good-sized litter, from genetically sound parents, and had a great start to life, I wouldn't worry too much for the first week. Just get her enrolled in a good puppy class and focus on letting her know you've got her back, that she can count on you and the world is a super fun place but there is no pressure to explore it yet.

Puppies are wired to stick close to home...and now you're her home!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've edited your thread title for clarity. Looked like maybe it was a typo. :) Hope that encourages more people to pop in and offer their advice!

Peggy was extremely confident when we first picked her up from the breeder and then almost immediately started showing signs of stress/fear. In her case, she wasn't digesting her kibble and was malnourished. Once we got her eating properly, she was much more lively and curious.

We also met with an excellent trainer (positive reinforcement/force-free) and she assessed Peggy and placed her in an appropriate puppy class. That really helped her blossom.

Is this your first dog? When did you bring her home? It must have been very recently. Did her breeder do any early socialization?

Assuming she came from a good-sized litter, from genetically sound parents, and had a great start to life, I wouldn't worry too much for the first week. Just get her enrolled in a good puppy class and focus on letting her know you've got her back, that she can count on you and the world is a super fun place but there is no pressure to explore it yet.

Puppies are wired to stick close to home...and now you're her home!
Yes,it’s my first puppy, I’ve never had a dog in my life! It’s only been a week! I am planning to take her in for a puppy training soon once she gets al her shots, but for a time being I wanted to make sure I’m doing a right thing to raise my little pup!
Also she hasn’t been eating much. I’ve introduced her to wet food and mix of small dry food but would hardly eat 1/4cup a day.
Do you have any suggestions?
 

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Keep taking her places, the socialization window closes around 16 weeks old. Everything you do until then will be of great benefit to her.
 

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If you haven't already, get the Ian Dunbar books, "Before and After You Get Your Puppy." They have lots of useful advice.


Like others suggest, give her many small positive experiences. Since she's still very small, you can probably put her in a carrier and take her for little outings to the pet store, Home Depot, and other places that allow pets. Leave her in the carrier, since her vaccinations aren't complete. Just let her watch the things around her from the safety of her carrier.

When she can come out of the carrier, don't force her to interact with things that scare her. Instead carefully examine the thing that scared her, perhaps touch it, and then either ignore it or start playing with it yourself.

Think of it this way. Imagine you are scared of snakes. What if someone came up to you waving a snake? Would you be less scared of snakes? No! You would still be scared of snakes, plus you would now distrust the jerk with the snake. Now, imagine something different. Your friend finds a snake, picks it up, and starts bending it around her fingers. She looks completely calm. Why is she not scared of the snake? You look closer. Oh, it's not really a snake at all; it's just a Mardi Gras necklace. What a silly mistake you made!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you haven't already, get the Ian Dunbar books, "Before and After You Get Your Puppy." They have lots of useful advice.


Like others suggest, give her many small positive experiences. Since she's still very small, you can probably put her in a carrier and take her for little outings to the pet store, Home Depot, and other places that allow pets. Leave her in the carrier, since her vaccinations aren't complete. Just let her watch the things around her from the safety of her carrier.

When she can come out of the carrier, don't force her to interact with things that scare her. Instead carefully examine the thing that scared her, perhaps touch it, and then either ignore it or start playing with it yourself.

Think of it this way. Imagine you are scared of snakes. What if someone came up to you waving a snake? Would you be less scared of snakes? No! You would still be scared of snakes, plus you would now distrust the jerk with the snake. Now, imagine something different. Your friend finds a snake, picks it up, and starts bending it around her fingers. She looks completely calm. Why is she not scared of the snake? You look closer. Oh, it's not really a snake at all; it's just a Mardi Gras necklace. What a silly mistake you made!
LOL This is such a great example! I’ll start taking her to Home Depot.. Can you recommend a good carrier?
 

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Here's a great socialization checklist I vaguely followed with my girl. There are SO MANY things I wouldn't think of that dogs can be afraid of and I like that she prioritizes quality of experience and working on improving them. Even just sitting and watching from a distance, like from a car in a busy parking lot can be good socialization.


 

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Yes,it’s my first puppy, I’ve never had a dog in my life! It’s only been a week! I am planning to take her in for a puppy training soon once she gets al her shots, but for a time being I wanted to make sure I’m doing a right thing to raise my little pup!
Also she hasn’t been eating much. I’ve introduced her to wet food and mix of small dry food but would hardly eat 1/4cup a day.
Do you have any suggestions?
How much does the package say she should be eating at her weight/age?

As long as she's a healthy weight and gaining regularly on a balanced puppy-appropriate diet, I wouldn't be too concerned. Puppy appetites can ebb and flow with growth spurts, and poodle puppies in particular are often quite good about self-regulating.

Since this is your first dog, I urge you to read the puppy manual mentioned by @cowpony if you've not already. I consider it essential reading:

Also available online for free:


 

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When you take your puppy out to get social exposure carry her in your arms so she can safely meet and greet.
 

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Here's a great socialization checklist I vaguely followed with my girl. There are SO MANY things I wouldn't think of that dogs can be afraid of and I like that she prioritizes quality of experience and working on improving them. Even just sitting and watching from a distance, like from a car in a busy parking lot can be good socialization.


The place where I took Galen for his teen class (he was too old for puppy class by the time covid quarantine lifted) sent us home with this list.

It really is amazing what will set off different dogs. Galen is currently freaked out about garden gnomes. Little did I think my puppy socialization would require me to scour the surrounding towns for yards owned by people with terrible taste in lawn ornaments.
 

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I have written elsewhere about the things that set carefully socialised Sophy off (cows in trees, two-headed humans, humans floating along without legs...) but had forgotten the griffin! A particularly ugly garden ornament with staring eyes - I was a bit worried by it myself!
 

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It really is amazing what will set off different dogs. Galen is currently freaked out about garden gnomes. Little did I think my puppy socialization would require me to scour the surrounding towns for yards owned by people with terrible taste in lawn ornaments.
Lol. Peggy's never really gotten over this. There's a faux stone squirrel at our vet's office that she doesn't fully trust.

On the other hand, we have a footstool shaped like a hippo that should be creepy. But when we first brought her home from the breeder, she marched straight up to it and sniffed its rear end.

Now they're BFFs:
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