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We went to see a young adult standard poodle who is being rehomed by his breeder (his only home). He is a beautiful dog but very attached to owner (clearly loves her). He seems very sweet and affectionate with her. He startled at different noises (the car door, husband’s laugh) and was very timid around us (he would slowly come and reach to take a treat but then go right back to sit behind owner). If she came close, then he would sit beside us as long as she was there and then allowed my husband to pet him. I think because of COVID that he has not been socialized. Although we both grew up with dogs we are first time dog owners as well as we have 2 teenagers at home. I’m wondering if he will be able to be socialized now and how well will he adjust to our place? Should we avoid this dog or with work will he come around? Thoughts?
 

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Thanks, Peggy for helping organizing my threads!
The breeder plays instruments as well and she says he is fine with them and the noise in the house. We did seem him via zoom first in the house and he was very chill and affectionate with her and seemed relaxed and fine with the other dogs. Had no problem being handled by her or having a bone taken out of mouth etc. Because of COVID we met outside the house in the garage
 

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I have misgivings about compatibility of the dog with your household. The dog is skittish. The dog is uncomfortable around strange men and who knows what else. You are inexperienced dog owners. You have teenaged boys who will presumably bring friends home to visit. The friends will probably yell and roughhouse like normal teenagers. I assume, once covid ends, you will have adult friends over to play music too. The dog may come around and calm down with more exposure to men, teenagers and musicians, but I wouldn't count on it. The opposite could happen, where the dog gets more anxious and nervous as he find himself unable to escape normal household chaos.
 

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Mia, Christmas in June 2010
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I am so sorry that this dog didn't work out. It's so hard when you are excited to meet a dog -- especially if you've been waiting to get a dog for a long time -- but when you finally meet an available dog, it's not quite the right fit. There's real grief in there. You're making the right choice, hard as it is.
 

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I'm sorry as well but I'd make the same choice. At that age I would feel this is a set temperament and not just puppy skittish behavior. I don't think it's a bad temperament (could be way worse!) but if it's not what you're hoping for then I'd move on. Socializing an adult dog takes a ton of work and it's something you should go into with eyes open. I see in the other thread that she's asking more than she does for puppies. This would be ok with me if the dog was exactly what I want, but is another reason I'd pass on it in this situation. I think this dog would do best in the home of a quiet retired couple that are homebodies and have a consistent life.
 

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I'm sorry as well but I'd make the same choice. At that age I would feel this is a set temperament and not just puppy skittish behavior. I don't think it's a bad temperament (could be way worse!) but if it's not what you're hoping for then I'd move on. Socializing an adult dog takes a ton of work and it's something you should go into with eyes open. I see in the other thread that she's asking more than she does for puppies. This would be ok with me if the dog was exactly what I want, but is another reason I'd pass on it in this situation. I think this dog would do best in the home of a quiet retired couple that are homebodies and have a consistent life.
I was thinking this dog would probably slot into my household quite well. No kids, quiet lifestyle.
 

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In your other thread I'd mentioned the almost 2 year old mpoo girls we got from a breeder.

Here's a bit more of their tale.

One girl, Noel, was a happy, friendly, didn't know a stranger kind of girl. Holly wasn't unfriendly but was far less outgoing and actually left the room when either my husband or the breeders husband entered. I'm certain sure that she'd never been abused. Both girls were very bonded to their breeder. Noel's personality won us both over but I was especially drawn to Holly.

My previous mpoo, Sass, was bog slow to warm to unknowns so I had an idea that Holly would be a real challenge for an inexperienced family but I also saw a bit of mischief in her. I felt there was a possibility that she could be drawn out of her shyness and fears. I'm so glad my husband suggested that we take them both.

Noel continued to love everybody, except my brother for some unknown reason🤷‍♀️. Holly switched her bond from the breeder to me, and was good with other women usually, but it took a while for us to get her to where she not only didn't leave the room, but would voluntarily and comfortably go to my husband to hang out. It took a while longer to help her be comfortable in groups of people she didn't know at all.

Eventually she began to actually enjoy attention from strangers and you could see her wondering why some people weren't paying attention to her. She had blossomed and the effort was all worth it, for us all.

Fast forward many years when we found ourselves looking for a poodle again to fill our far too quiet house. We met a 6 year old girl, Tess, retired from breeding. She seemed very sweet but very shy and very bonded to her breeder. She wouldn't go near my husband voluntarily.

Knowing what it might take to help this girl, knowing that we had a good chance of helping, we reluctantly chose not to bring her home with us. We felt that while we could probably help her, it wasn't the right time in our lives.

We ended up taking on a very different sort of challenge - two almost 9 week old mpoo brothers who'll be 4 years old at the end of April.

We made the right choice for us, which I also hope was the right choice for Tess. Still, I wonder sometimes how she's doing and hope she's as happy as we and our boys are.
 

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I also think this dog would not be a good match in a household with teenagers. He is the type of dog that will cling to one person and either don’t care about the others or be afraid of them.

I have one of those. He is the apricot toy in the picture below. He is perfect for someone living alone, but would be miserable in a busy family setting.

I would pass.
 

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It sounds like the dog was timid of the breeders husband. If the dog was warming up to both you and your husband, that’s a good sign. I interpret that as he feels he can trust you both. Maybe he does not trust the breeders husband?
 

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I'm glad you are thinking about the needs to the dog. I am concerned about this breeder's experience, because given this dog's temperament, the breeder should be looking for a specific type of home environment.
 

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I think the dog needs a more experienced home. A shy, nervous type dog takes extra time and effort to train and likely will always have some of these tendencies even though they will be managed. I don't think its a good fit for first time dog owners. But thats just my opinion.
 
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