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Discussion Starter #1
So I'll be getting my pup in a very long 5 weeks. I have never used clippers on a dog. I do bathe blow dry and brush out my toy poodle mix, he has the wirey hair of a poodle. I am to scared to use clippers on him cause he's just so small and I'm afraid of hurting him. I

s it possible to just watch the online videos on you tube and get a couple of books to learn to groom? I think it would be fun to learn how to do.

Anyone else teach theirselves how to groom their dog? He's going to be a family pet. I think I could learn 1 cut and get good at it (maybe) But have no intentions of trying anything out of my league. Is a lamb cut hard? Whats the hardest part? Should I just let the groomer I have get him started and try to maintain?
 

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I'm a little biased because I am a groomer but if I had never used clippers before I might have a groomer get him started. Just to kind of back up what the breeder did when they start doing face, feet, and tail. Have him in a couple of times and then do it myself. Another thing to consider is what will happen if for some reason you are not able to groom the dog for a period of time. It never hurts to have them understand that the occasional trip to the groomers is no big deal, just in case. I have some clients who who only come in four times a year or so and they maintain the dog on their own at home. They do a good job, (so far). The clip the dog and everything. They come in to have the pattern reset or to just get a good pro job that they can follow at home for a few months with ease. When it starts looking different they are back. It works out pretty well actualy.

The hardest part of the lamb is probably the legs and the topknot. I've heard others on hear say they have difficulty with back legs in particular.

No a lamb clip isn't hard at all, basicly all it is is when the body is cliped short and the legs are left long. There are tons are variations where the legs are blended in really well or are left pretty much untouched. Some people also like the legs to look really defined like hips and shoulders. Do some searches online and you'll find all sorts
 

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Thanks for the help! Another question I have is do groomers go to a 'grooming' school? If so how long does it take to get 'certified' or trained?
 

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I think it depends on the groomer, some do, (I think they all should), and some are trained in private shops. Going to a grooming school though doesn't make a good groomer, some things can only be learned from experience. It takes years to get really good.
I have a client who went to school just so she could groom her grouchy lhasa herself :) She got tired of being turned away from other shops lol
 

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I plan to go to a grooming school when I can afford it and find a decent one where I live. There isnt one here so it might take relocating for a bit.

I think you can learn a lot from good DVDs, there are bad ones out there too so do your research.

I can't stress enough how getting good quality clippers will help you. It will save you TONS of stress. Don't buy the $40 clipper sets from Walmart or Target. I would go to groomers.net and look at possibly getting some nice used ones if you don't want to spend a fortune or you can get some nice Andis 2 speed clippers from petedge for about $130 or so.

You'll probably want a few blades and a comb set for a lamb. I'd get a #10 #15 #30 #3 or #7 depending how short you want the body and then I like the Wahl metal comb set, it seems to go through coats better than the cheap plastic ones. The combs are basically guards that can keep the coat longer. For beginning it will help shape the legs and such without you having to do a lot of scissoring work. Hand scissoring takes a lot of practice, I personally am still pretty bad at it, but im learning. I constantly use combs and then just neaten up from there, im too nervous to completely hand scissor. You put a blade on your clippers and then put the guard over it to set the length, for the metal combs if you go with them you'll have to use a #30 blade under the comb, anything smaller and it will break the teeth off. At least i've had problems and lost many #40 blades because of it.

You could also go to www.groomers.net and look at a bunch of the poodles they post and critique to learn a few things and get ideas/tips and also find good prices on used grooming equipment.

I have a few DVDs from here and love them: http://www.jodimurphy.net/products_instructionalseries.htm

I have the poodle one, the snap on comb one, thinning shears and scissoring. They're really helpful and pretty easy to follow.

It's awesome you want to groom your own dog. I do agree with maybe taking your dog to a professional grooming salon for the first clip and you just try to maintain it, if that makes sense. They can also give you tips on how to train your dog because grooming is a lot easier if the dog is trained from the beginning on how to act and the entire experience becomes much more enjoyable for both groomer and pet.

I think it's a wonderful bonding experience to groom your own dog. I just love grooming my dogs!
 

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I plan to go to a grooming school when I can afford it and find a decent one where I live. There isnt one here so it might take relocating for a bit.

I think you can learn a lot from good DVDs, there are bad ones out there too so do your research.

I can't stress enough how getting good quality clippers will help you. It will save you TONS of stress. Don't buy the $40 clipper sets from Walmart or Target. I would go to groomers.net and look at possibly getting some nice used ones if you don't want to spend a fortune or you can get some nice Andis 2 speed clippers from petedge for about $130 or so.

You'll probably want a few blades and a comb set for a lamb. I'd get a #10 #15 #30 #3 or #7 depending how short you want the body and then I like the Wahl metal comb set, it seems to go through coats better than the cheap plastic ones. The combs are basically guards that can keep the coat longer. For beginning it will help shape the legs and such without you having to do a lot of scissoring work. Hand scissoring takes a lot of practice, I personally am still pretty bad at it, but im learning. I constantly use combs and then just neaten up from there, im too nervous to completely hand scissor. You put a blade on your clippers and then put the guard over it to set the length, for the metal combs if you go with them you'll have to use a #30 blade under the comb, anything smaller and it will break the teeth off. At least i've had problems and lost many #40 blades because of it.

You could also go to www.groomers.net and look at a bunch of the poodles they post and critique to learn a few things and get ideas/tips and also find good prices on used grooming equipment.

I have a few DVDs from here and love them: http://www.jodimurphy.net/products_instructionalseries.htm

I have the poodle one, the snap on comb one, thinning shears and scissoring. They're really helpful and pretty easy to follow.

It's awesome you want to groom your own dog. I do agree with maybe taking your dog to a professional grooming salon for the first clip and you just try to maintain it, if that makes sense. They can also give you tips on how to train your dog because grooming is a lot easier if the dog is trained from the beginning on how to act and the entire experience becomes much more enjoyable for both groomer and pet.

I think it's a wonderful bonding experience to groom your own dog. I just love grooming my dogs!
Lots of great tips thank you!
 

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the lamb is probably the legs

I'm a little biased because I am a groomer but if I had never used clippers before I might have a groomer get him started. Just to kind of back up what the breeder did when they start doing face, feet, and tail. Have him in a couple of times and then do it myself. Another thing to consider is what will happen if for some reason you are not able to groom the dog for a period of time. It never hurts to have them understand that the occasional trip to the groomers is no big deal, just in case. I have some clients who who only come in four times a year or so and they maintain the dog on their own at home. They do a good job, (so far). The clip the dog and everything. They come in to have the pattern reset or to just get a good pro job that they can follow at home for a few months with ease. When it starts looking different they are back. It works out pretty well actualy.

The hardest part of the lamb is probably the legs and the topknot. I've heard others on hear say they have difficulty with back legs in particular.

No a lamb clip isn't hard at all, basicly all it is is when the body is cliped short and the legs are left long. There are tons are variations where the legs are blended in really well or are left pretty much untouched. Some people also like the legs to look really defined like hips and shoulders. Do some searches online and you'll find all sorts
great inclusion here .... wheres your pet busiiness located exactly lol :):questionmark:
 

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great inclusion here .... wheres your pet busiiness located exactly lol :):questionmark:
I'm in the panhandle of Florida in fort walton beach.

Sure wouldn't mind being in Hawaii though... :p My sister in law is stationed there. Too bad my hubby doesn't come from a close family or that would be a great excuse to go! LoL
 
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