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Discussion Starter #1
Although talked about from time to time I do not see much posted specifically in regards to the health issues our dogs face. What other ones stand out that we may need to know about. (some more comman then others) Maybe we'll have a sticky on health at some point (maybe we do):) (this was a C&P)

Health


Four of the most serious conditions to be aware of are: Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Sebaceous Adenitis, Addison’s disease and Idiopathic Epilepsy.

Canine Idiopathic Epilepsy is a neurological disorder associated with recurrent seizures. The condition appears in dogs between the ages of one to five, and can be managed with medications.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy is rare in Standard Poodles, being more frequent in the smaller breeds. This progressive disease causes the retina to “shrivel up.” PRA can appear between the ages of two and eight and worsens with age. There is no treatment but most dogs adapt to the gradual loss of eyesight.

Sebaceous Adenitis is a disease in which the sebaceous glands become inflamed and then die. Normal sebaceous glands help prevent the skin from drying out. This health problem is especially prevalent in the Standard Poodle. It can cause scaly patches or hair loss.

Addison’s Disease is an inherited disease that results in a lack of function of the adrenal glands. It occurs mostly in spayed and neutered dogs between the ages of two to five years of age. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, lack of appetite, tremors, muscle weakness, and pain in hind quarters. This genetic disease is treatable with medication Standard Poodles seem to be highly susceptible to this disease.


Other conditions common to the breed:
Hip Dysplasia is common in many large breeds. It is a hereditary disease that results in the abnormal development of the hip joint. It causes arthritis and pain, due to the bones rubbing against each other. Most dogs with hip dysplasia are born with normal hips, but as the disease progresses, end up in pain in one or both rear legs.

Bloat is probably the most serious and life threatening medical emergency that can happen to Standard Poodles. If not detected, a dog can deteriorate quite rapidly. The symptoms of bloat are stomach pain due to gas and/or food causing the stomach stretch. The stretched stomach twists off the blood supply and cuts off the only route for gas to escape. A dog with “Bloat” can die very quickly, in just a matter of a few hours without medical attention.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maybe there will people with experience with some of these health issues. It's always good to become educated on the signs and symptoms as well.

Being a poodle owner has been a blessing for me, I could not imagine them getting sick.
 

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From someone that works in a Vet's office - what are some early symptoms?

I was also curious if a pup survives something like parvo or other serious issues are there also other adverse affects to their health and what would they be?
 

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From someone that works in a Vet's office - what are some early symptoms?

I was also curious if a pup survives something like parvo or other serious issues are there also other adverse affects to their health and what would they be?

Its really hard to say if there are any lingering affects from health problems. Most parvo pups go on to lead very healthy lives. Ive heard of some that have some GI issues, but are healthy for the most part. It really just depends on what they have and how bad. The body has an Amazing ability of recovering and healing itself (alot more then we give it credit for sometimes i think).

Some of the most common signs of immune problems are just general ADR (aint doing right, which is now a legalized medical term :D). Not eating, lethargy, vomiting. Pale mucous membrane color is another big indication as mostly the red blood cells are affected. Panting/trouble breathing could also be a sign (from decreased RBC's which carry oxygen, so the body is starving for it). Bruising (like Sport) if it is a clotting issue.

Besides the noticeable bruising though, most of the symptoms could be Hundreds of possibilities! Its one of those "know thy dog" things. Like for example, i dont rush Riley to the vet everytime he vomits or we would be there weekly. If he doesnt eat his meal though then i am much more concerned. Some dogs frequently dont want to eat and are ok.
There are some theorys on linking immune problems with vaccines. Sometime you see an immune issue a couple weeks after vaccines, alot of times not. There is no proven link to that though.
 
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