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I was reading the 'Why Purebred' thread but I couldn't post cuz as everyone knows Molly is a MiniX and to me she is perfect. I understand though how lucky I am to have a mutt that has never had a sick day, not even a tummy ache, in the 6 1/2 years I have owned her........ other than a reaction to the rabies vaccine, which I don't count as even purebreds will have reactions to certain Vaccines!

I then got to thinking......knowing thru DNA what breeds are in her background, what diseases are prevalent in each of them?
And BOY if I were a hypochondriac poodle I'd be really worried LOL! Many of the ailments were prevalent across ALL her breeds! If you want to see what Dr Dodds found here is the pdf!
http://www.hsvma.org/assets/pdfs/guide-to-congenital-and-heritable-disorders.pdf
 

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OMG, it never realized that beautiful Miss Molly wasn't a pure poodle. I just never read on the side about her, I always just looked at her pic and she screamed poodle to me. K, call me dingy, lol.

And I have to agree with you for the simple fact that I almost always have some sort of mix county pound adoptee, my most resent being my Eustace, some sort of airedale/hellhound cross. Eustace is my nothing bothers him type of dog, feed him rusty nails and he would thrive.

On the other side of the coin, I have been a poodle person for 44 years now and must have a pure bred poodle in my life, no ifs ands or buts on that matter.

And I know that what makes a pure bred of any breed basically means a very inbreed dog, inbreeding made the breed to start with, which means health problems can be multiplied. Responsible breeders can do health checks for breed problems, and all pure breeds have them, for generations, but that still does not mean they are not recessive and laying in wait for a certain gene combination to bring them out, be it in two generations or twenty generations, they are still lurking.

And I have seen them in each and every beloved pure bred poodle I have ever know and through my years of working for breeders and handlers as well as my own personal pet, basically many hundreds of poodles.

Yes, it so much easier with Eustace, do anything and everything to that dog, he's bullet proof, and yes it is harder dealing with Rolands sensitive stomach and having to monitor everything he eats, even those he eats behind my back, not to mention his eye problems. Also I loss the one before him at only 10 years of age to bloat, again, spoos deep chest makes everything slip if something as simple as sliding on the ice as in my case, still not over that one.

But I still choose to take on these problems to have my pure bred poodle, as I said, I just can't think of a life without a pure bred poodle in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thank You Dechi......I kinda like her too hahaha!

Here's what her DNA said.......
50% Miniature poodle
10.46 Australian Koolie
6.62% Australian Kelpie
6.10% Giant Schnauzer
5.74% Harrier
5.71% Bernese Mountain Dog
with the remainder 15.37 % unrecognized

All those BIG dogs in her little 11 inch tall body LOL!!! I did question the results and I was told the dominate breed will be the 'most' visible physically, and behaviors are where she might differ.....since all the breeds are ones of intelligence, I have no problem with that at all LOL!

P.S. She definitely acts like a poodle too!
 
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Molly has hybrid vigor, that is why she is so healthy ;) Our family Heinz 57 lived 17 years with not a sick day until the day he died. Just today, my sister and I were just talking about her rescue mutt who lived to be 18 and, same thing, was healthy until the day he died. She currently has another Heinz who is 17 and she thinks will live another year.

Hybrid vigor is real. I always tell people to either get a purebred puppy from fully health tested parents or get a mutt from the shelter if you want to increase the odds of having a dog with good health.
 

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I too have always thought that Molly is a nice example of hybrid vigor. My first dog was a retriever mix and she was stunningly healthy and lived to be a ripe old age.

A Ph.D person from the Institute of Canine Biology published an opinion article saying hybrid vigor is a myth, but I don't buy into every assertion made by someone with an advanced degree. Not a week goes by in this country without publications where one person or "study" says something that another one contradicts, whether it's diets, economics, best child raising practices, etc.

I've pondered all I've read here over the past year, and there's a significant number of poodles from good breeders that passed DNA and x-ray testing yet still succumb to other non-testable diseases, as well as difficult personalities in which misguided training is blamed. This isn't a poodle thing, it's a purebred dog thing.

It's like having a child: you get what you get. It's like a family can have several kids and feed, nurture, and train them all the same way, yet one sucks the oxygen out of the room from a young age with their tantrums, or becomes an alcoholic/drug addict, or gets cancer which doesn't run in the family.

The best breeders, I've concluded, can control for the eradication of some traits like PRA, but not for everything. Getting a mixed breed dog is like playing Russian Roulette, but there are not as many bullets in the chambers as we are led to believe. Where I grew up, most people had 'mutts' (a term I hate to this day; it's disrespectful to the dog and insinuates the owner is too poor to buy a purebred, which may true, but since when is not being financially well-off a crime?). Let me tell you, most of these so called mutts lived forever, and beyond the rabies vaccine which they may or may not have received, rarely had vaccinations.

Molly is da bomb; there was no bullet in the chamber when she was conceived. :)
 

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We got Joule from a rescue. My very first poodle!

My intention was get a Chihuahua to replace our recently passed, Hazard. When I got to the rescue all they had was this sad little poodle puppy. She was so scared and her fur was cut choppy and messy. She got spooked by something and leaped into my arms and cling to me like a human toddler!

This was the first day I realized how in love I am with poodles. I don’t know if she is purebred but she really looks like to me. She’s a mini and best dog I’ve ever had my life.

I’m such a dork! I’m in tears now cuz I love her so much!

I don’t think I’ll ever want another breed again. She is amazing!
 

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Very well said!
And I’d like to add - If it were possible to completely eradicate diseases from any breed of dog or any other species for that matter, I’m pretty sure they would have already done this for humans!


I too have always thought that Molly is a nice example of hybrid vigor. My first dog was a retriever mix and she was stunningly healthy and lived to be a ripe old age.

A Ph.D person from the Institute of Canine Biology published an opinion article saying hybrid vigor is a myth, but I don't buy into every assertion made by someone with an advanced degree. Not a week goes by in this country without publications where one person or "study" says something that another one contradicts, whether it's diets, economics, best child raising practices, etc.

I've pondered all I've read here over the past year, and there's a significant number of poodles from good breeders that passed DNA and x-ray testing yet still succumb to other non-testable diseases, as well as difficult personalities in which misguided training is blamed. This isn't a poodle thing, it's a purebred dog thing.

It's like having a child: you get what you get. It's like a family can have several kids and feed, nurture, and train them all the same way, yet one sucks the oxygen out of the room from a young age with their tantrums, or becomes an alcoholic/drug addict, or gets cancer which doesn't run in the family.

The best breeders, I've concluded, can control for the eradication of some traits like PRA, but not for everything. Getting a mixed breed dog is like playing Russian Roulette, but there are not as many bullets in the chambers as we are led to believe. Where I grew up, most people had 'mutts' (a term I hate to this day; it's disrespectful to the dog and insinuates the owner is too poor to buy a purebred, which may true, but since when is not being financially well-off a crime?). Let me tell you, most of these so called mutts lived forever, and beyond the rabies vaccine which they may or may not have received, rarely had vaccinations.

Molly is da bomb; there was no bullet in the chamber when she was conceived.
 
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