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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I couldn't decide whether to make my thread a diary under "52 Weeks of..." or a training log under "General Training & Obedience"...so I decided to make it both, under the general term "Poodle Talk."

Tessa the blue Standard Poodle puppy is coming home tomorrow! We are going to drive to Sacramento to pick up a female puppy from our breeder (we still don't know which exact puppy it will be). According to my PitaPata ticker, the puppies in the litter are currently exactly 8 weeks old. I will be using this thread to post pictures, updates on how she is and what she is doing, and how training is going with her.

I can't think of much else to write here now, but I am sure I will have much more to say tomorrow after we get her.
 

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Have an awesome gotcha day. I will be happy to see pics and training progress.
 

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Happy Gotcha day. Looking forward to Tessa’s puppy photos.
 

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That's great news! How long is your drive? Looking forward to Tessa pictures and updates!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Summary of Gotcha day:
We drove 2 1/2 hours to the breeder's house (Susan of 5 Star Poodles), where we met all the remaining puppies in the litter (a few had already gone to their new homes) as well as their parents. In the car, our puppy was in a box between me and another family member in the backseat. She drooled and threw up several times, as was expected, but overall she did quite well. At home we let her in the backyard but she was too overwhelmed by her new surroundings, so we brought her in and put her in an exercise pen. She was happy there as long as someone is inside the pen or right next to it, interacting with her, but otherwise she would start to whine and eventually to yelp and bark. This happened while we were eating dinner, and we tried to ignore her but then she pooped in the ex-pen (our fault for not waiting long enough outside for her to "use the bathroom"). After letting her outside again, we tried giving her some of her kibble, and found that she would not eat it. The breeder said she had been mixing their kibble with cooked meat to get them to eat it, so we moistened the kibble, added a bit of cooked chicken, and then she ate it in a stuffable toy. We also tried playing with her with some toys. She seems to like small tennis balls, but she doesn't pick them up and bring them back. As for the sleeping arrangement, she slept in a bed in the exercise pen with me and another family sleeping in the room near her. I took her outside three times during the night, as I was quite afraid she would pee in the exercise pen, and after each time I had to pet her until she fell asleep to some extent so she would not whine as much. She did whine whenever she woke up, but she usually quieted down after a couple of minutes.

The puppy has been outside several times this morning. She still wouldn't eat plain moistened kibble, so we added a bit of chicken broth. This helped somewhat, but it was not nearly as successful as the cooked chicken. We don't have any dog treats or anything, so it seems like if I want to train her with food I will have to use cooked meat or moistened kibble mixed with meat.

Here are a few questions I have:
-How much meat is too much? Is it fine to just keep mixing her kibble with meat? (We plan on changing her kibble to a new type when we run out of the current one, but that will be in a while and there is no guarantee she will like the new one).
-Should we get actual dog treats? If so, what type would you recommend for puppies?
-How can I train her to bring toys like tennis balls back to me rather than pouncing on them, lying down, and chewing on them?
-Any recommendations for keeping her calm when we can't be right next to her?
-Should we let her explore the rest of the house now, or wait until she has settled in some more?
-We got a dog stroller and would like to soon be able to go for walks with her in the stroller. Any tips on how to get her used to being inside it? And how long a walk do you think she could handle?

Pictures coming in the next post!
 

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She’s gorgeous, I love how expressive her eyes are.

Here are a few questions I have:
-How much meat is too much? Is it fine to just keep mixing her kibble with meat? (We plan on changing her kibble to a new type when we run out of the current one, but that will be in a while and there is no guarantee she will like the new one).
-Should we get actual dog treats? If so, what type would you recommend for puppies?
-How can I train her to bring toys like tennis balls back to me rather than pouncing on them, lying down, and chewing on them?
-Any recommendations for keeping her calm when we can't be right next to her?
-Should we let her explore the rest of the house now, or wait until she has settled in some more?
-We got a dog stroller and would like to soon be able to go for walks with her in the stroller. Any tips on how to get her used to being inside it? And how long a walk do you think she could handle?
My puppy also wouldn’t eat the kibble and I was told to wet it. Instead I found he would eat it dry from my hands. I like to feed my dogs from my hands. It helps bond them to me and I use their food in training. In a few days my puppy had settled down in his new home and would eat his kibble from a bowl. In addition I like to train with soft, easy to eat food so I looked or a puppy food I could use as training treats in addition to kibble. My other dog has food allergies so I chose something they both could eat , Fresh Pet puppy food. Fresh Pet is mostly used for training and I cut some up to add to kibble. I like to keep my dog on kibble in case we lose power or when traveling it’s easier to deal with.

The problem with how much meat to add is most meat is only protein and lacking other nutrients a growing puppy needs. A tiny sprinkling is fine but more means less calcium and phosphorus for growing bones for example. Also adding food to the kibble can make a picky poodle more picky.

For dog treats, I like to keep them simple in case there’s a food allergy or intolerance. Lots of treats have glycerine which can lead to soft stools in some dogs. My dogs don’t need all those added chemicals. In the house I use their food, outside with more distractions I use Turkey breast, home baked low fat hamburger, freeze dried meat etc,

She’s still so new and young. In the next few weeks she will settle down, training is going to be tiny sessions several times a day. She may retrieve in a few days once everything isn’t so new and confusing.

Don‘t use real tennis balls, the coating will damage their teeth, use only balls designed for dogs....they have dog tennis balls without the harsh abrasive coating.

Keeping calm will take time, she’s just left the only home and sources of comfortable she’s known. Music can help, toys, treat dispensing puzzle toys and being near you. You can tether her to you with a leash as you perform some tasks. Puppies need a lot of sleep so some work can be done during a nap. Talking from a nearby room helps too.

She doesn’t need to explore the rest of the house for awhile, let her get comfortable in a smaller area . When you do, make certain it’s after she has pottied first. She can visit while tethered to you as you need to go to different rooms. Slowly introduce her to all parts of the house including basement so she sees all parts as the house and not ares to go potty in.

Hopefully someone will post recommendations on how far to walk. As puppies are growing we don’t want to stress joints by too much repetition including walking. I’m do a mix of walking and lots of stops to sniff. Since you have a stroller you could do a short puppy stroll, sniff then in the stroller for people to get their exercise walking.

Do you have a harness to keep her inside the stroller safe and comfortable?

I would desensitize her slowly with treats to the stroller. Break it into tiny baby steps repeated several times till she’s comfortable. Step back if she’s afraid. Treat to get in and out several times getting used to being lifted and fitted inside. Treat to push an inch. Treat to push a few inches. Treat to push a foot or two. Treat to push forward and then backwards a few inches. Treat to get in and out of stroller outside. Treat to push an inch outside etc. Work slowly to being pushed several feet at which point she should be good for a ride if there’s a bumpy area, or going up and down curbs etc stop to treat and desensitize to if she shows any fear.
 

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Congratulations on your beauty! Great info from Skylar :).

Hopefully someone will post recommendations on how far to walk. As puppies are growing we don’t want to stress joints by too much repetition including walking.
Courtesy of PTP from this site: Exercise Guidelines for Puppies (By Puppy Culture) – Inugami – Finnish Spitz

"There’s an idea that’s caught on like wildfire that exercise is some kind of panacea that will solve all behavior problems. Not only is this not true, it’s led to dangerous trend of owners pushing their puppies to inapproriate levels of exercise."



and this:

"How Much Exercise a Poodle Needs

Puppies
- For toys and miniatures under 1 year old and standards under 18 months old, owners must carefully schedule exercise times. Offering quick bouts of outdoor walking is a great way to for the puppy to discharge their abundant energy.
That being said, greatly exceeding exercise limits for puppies can be detrimental to their growth.

Why? During the first year for toys and miniature Poodles (and until about 18 months old for standard Poodles), the bones are still forming and growing. At the end of all major bones are growth plates; these are soft areas that contain rapidly dividing cells that are instrumental in allowing the bones to develop and grow longer as the Poodle pup matures from puppy to adult.

Once a Poodle is done with puberty and is officially an adult dog that is done growing (approx 18-24m), the plates harden and calcify. Until that time, over-exercise can cause injury to this soft bone tissue and interfere with normal bone growth.


So, you'll want to find a balance of enough walks, for the proper duration, to allow the pup to release energy and start becoming socialized to the world, yet be careful to not exercise your Poodle puppy to such an extent that it could possibly harm those growth plates.

Do keep in mind that normal play in the house, etc. is expected and a puppy needn't be crated to keep him from moving around! Over-exercise relates to repetitive actions such as running, walking briskly, etc. for an extended amount of time… It is important that a puppy romp around to his heart's desire… when he gets tired, he will rest. You just never want to push a young puppy into activity that puts stress on the body and raises the heartbeat if he is not up to it.

In looking at these guidelines, we must remember that the duration is the same, no matter the size of the dog. This is because it is the pace at which the dog moves that equates a state of exercise. Toys will trot and standard Poodles will trot, and it is the owner that will need to adjust the pace at which they walk to keep the dog going briskly.

A good rule of thumb is: 5 minutes per day, for each month of age. Here is a quick reference of recommended exercise times:

3 months old = One 15 minute walk each day
4 months old = Total of 20 minutes; this can be two 10 minute walks
5 months old = Total of 25 minutes; split into two walks
6 months old = Total of 30 minutes; split into three 10 or two 15 minute walks
7 months old = Total of 35 minutes; divided into two sessions
8 months old = Total of 40 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15 and 10 minutes)
9 months old = Total of 45 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15, 15)
10 months old = Total of 50 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 15)
11 months old = Total of 55 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 20)
For standards only, 12 months through 23 months = Continuation of 55 minutes (20, 15, 20). Toys and minis will at this point, move ahead to adult exercise requirements.

You'll want to go at a moderate pace that is not overwhelming. Young puppies are only starting to learn about how to walk on leash and it can take some time for them to focus on proper heeling. Ahead, we'll dive into tips to making walking a more pleasant experience coming up."

here's the link to that page:


Poodle Exercise Requirements | Toy, Mini, Standard
How much exercise a Poodle needs to stay healthy. Puppies, adults and seniors of each variety. Tips for exercising during the summer and winter.
www.allpoodleinfo.com

www.allpoodleinfo.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Today's puppy pictures are here! As you can see, Tessa enjoys being outside. Every time she goes out, though, she picks up oak leaves, acorn caps, grass, and even rocks and pebbles and starts chewing them up. Should I be afraid she will swallow them?
(She is sleeping next to me as I write this, and I can tell she is dreaming because she is twitching her legs and head and I can see her eyes moving!)
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Every time she goes out, though, she picks up oak leaves, acorn caps, grass, and even rocks and pebbles and starts chewing them up. Should I be afraid she will swallow them?
The leaves and grass are likely to be chewed and swallowed. Countryboy started a thread vey recently on this topic. So long as she's not unsupervised and you know that any plant life in your yard isn't toxic, I wouldn't be too concerned. I know my boys do that.

The acorn caps were more popular when they were puppies. I'd usually try the trade for a treat, which gives the opportunity to train for Leave It and Drop It, and being able to remove things from their mouths, all potentially life-saving.

My boys went after the mulch too, so I kept the beds as tidy as I could and put temporary fencing up. A lot of these behaviors become outgrown, especially if the chance to practice them is reduced.

Our first summer together, 2017, was a big cicada summer in our area and they'd both go after any in reach and eat them in spite of my efforts. (Nothing like looking at a very satisfied poodle face while the cicada is still buzzing in his mouth lol.)

Rocks and pebbles are common targets, and can be very serious if swallowed, so I'd work on that also. Stay as calm as you can and just make the treat (toy, etc) more appealing than the rock.

I recommend vigilance with zen overtones :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The leaves and grass are likely to be chewed and swallowed. Countryboy started a thread vey recently on this topic. So long as she's not unsupervised and you know that any plant life in your yard isn't toxic, I wouldn't be too concerned. I know my boys do that.

The acorn caps were more popular when they were puppies. I'd usually try the trade for a treat, which gives the opportunity to train for Leave It and Drop It, and being able to remove things from their mouths, all potentially life-saving.

My boys went after the mulch too, so I kept the beds as tidy as I could and put temporary fencing up. A lot of these behaviors become outgrown, especially if the chance to practice them is reduced.

Our first summer together, 2017, was a big cicada summer in our area and they'd both go after any in reach and eat them in spite of my efforts. (Nothing like looking at a very satisfied poodle face while the cicada is still buzzing in his mouth lol.)

Rocks and pebbles are common targets, and can be very serious if swallowed, so I'd work on that also. Stay as calm as you can and just make the treat (toy, etc) more appealing than the rock.

I recommend vigilance with zen overtones :)
Thank you for the advice! It is very difficult to redirect Tessa's attention to desirable objects (like treats or toys) because she just seems to find the undesirable objects more appealing (dirt, rocks, cardboard boxes, even her exercise pen, etc.). I will try high-value treats (cooked chicken) and see if it works any better. Usually when I take her outside I don't have any treats on me, or if I do it is just her kibble (very low-value), so she doesn't listen and I have to pick her up and move her away. We haven't started leash training because we don't yet have a harness or a martingale to attach it to, so I have limited control over her movement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Congratulations on your beauty! Great info from Skylar :).



Courtesy of PTP from this site: Exercise Guidelines for Puppies (By Puppy Culture) – Inugami – Finnish Spitz

"There’s an idea that’s caught on like wildfire that exercise is some kind of panacea that will solve all behavior problems. Not only is this not true, it’s led to dangerous trend of owners pushing their puppies to inapproriate levels of exercise."



and this:

"How Much Exercise a Poodle Needs

Puppies
- For toys and miniatures under 1 year old and standards under 18 months old, owners must carefully schedule exercise times. Offering quick bouts of outdoor walking is a great way to for the puppy to discharge their abundant energy.
That being said, greatly exceeding exercise limits for puppies can be detrimental to their growth.

Why? During the first year for toys and miniature Poodles (and until about 18 months old for standard Poodles), the bones are still forming and growing. At the end of all major bones are growth plates; these are soft areas that contain rapidly dividing cells that are instrumental in allowing the bones to develop and grow longer as the Poodle pup matures from puppy to adult.

Once a Poodle is done with puberty and is officially an adult dog that is done growing (approx 18-24m), the plates harden and calcify. Until that time, over-exercise can cause injury to this soft bone tissue and interfere with normal bone growth.


So, you'll want to find a balance of enough walks, for the proper duration, to allow the pup to release energy and start becoming socialized to the world, yet be careful to not exercise your Poodle puppy to such an extent that it could possibly harm those growth plates.

Do keep in mind that normal play in the house, etc. is expected and a puppy needn't be crated to keep him from moving around! Over-exercise relates to repetitive actions such as running, walking briskly, etc. for an extended amount of time… It is important that a puppy romp around to his heart's desire… when he gets tired, he will rest. You just never want to push a young puppy into activity that puts stress on the body and raises the heartbeat if he is not up to it.

In looking at these guidelines, we must remember that the duration is the same, no matter the size of the dog. This is because it is the pace at which the dog moves that equates a state of exercise. Toys will trot and standard Poodles will trot, and it is the owner that will need to adjust the pace at which they walk to keep the dog going briskly.

A good rule of thumb is: 5 minutes per day, for each month of age. Here is a quick reference of recommended exercise times:

3 months old = One 15 minute walk each day
4 months old = Total of 20 minutes; this can be two 10 minute walks
5 months old = Total of 25 minutes; split into two walks
6 months old = Total of 30 minutes; split into three 10 or two 15 minute walks
7 months old = Total of 35 minutes; divided into two sessions
8 months old = Total of 40 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15 and 10 minutes)
9 months old = Total of 45 minutes; best if done in three sessions (15, 15, 15)
10 months old = Total of 50 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 15)
11 months old = Total of 55 minutes; best if done in three sessions (20, 15, 20)
For standards only, 12 months through 23 months = Continuation of 55 minutes (20, 15, 20). Toys and minis will at this point, move ahead to adult exercise requirements.

You'll want to go at a moderate pace that is not overwhelming. Young puppies are only starting to learn about how to walk on leash and it can take some time for them to focus on proper heeling. Ahead, we'll dive into tips to making walking a more pleasant experience coming up."

here's the link to that page:


Poodle Exercise Requirements | Toy, Mini, Standard
How much exercise a Poodle needs to stay healthy. Puppies, adults and seniors of each variety. Tips for exercising during the summer and winter.
www.allpoodleinfo.com

www.allpoodleinfo.com
Thank you! That is a really helpful article. I will keep this in mind for when she is fully vaccinated and able to start going places on walks.
 

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Usually when I take her outside I don't have any treats on me, or if I do it is just her kibble (very low-value),
Outside is the place for high-value treats. You never know what sort of learning experience you might encounter, so always be prepared. :) And keep the pics coming! Adorable baby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Outside is the place for high-value treats. You never know what sort of learning experience you might encounter, so always be prepared. :) And keep the pics coming! Adorable baby.
Thanks! I will have to take some new pictures soon.
I also need to shave the face and feet soon. I have never done it before (never even used an electric clipper), so it is going to be very scary for me. She is very tolerant of handling and has been groomed several times by the breeder, but still...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Tessa is getting good at settling on her bed! She will only do it when someone is right near her (separation is our main issue) and when she feels comfortable (she doesn't like settling when she is very active), but otherwise she is doing quite well with it. Sometimes she won't even get up when I give the release cue and toss a treat away from the bed! She is also okay with stepping into and lying down in the bike trailer / stroller, which is really nice. She was startled by the loud click of a buckle on the side of the trailer, so that is something we will have to work on, along with getting to the point where we can close the entrance flap with her staying calm. We will then have to train her to stay calm when we attach her harness to the inside of the trailer. Unfortunately we haven't been able to start harness or leash training yet, because the harness hasn't arrived yet and won't for a couple more days.
 

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I also need to shave the face and feet soon. I have never done it before (never even used an electric clipper), so it is going to be very scary for me.
Keep in mind a couple of things.

It doesn't have to be done all at the same time. Tessa won't care (so long as you don't laugh too much at the look lol).

Practice the moves first. It helps if you have a full cover for the blade teeth, or a guard comb or just take the blade off. Start with the clipper off and practice. Next, with the cover or comb still on, turn the clipper on and practice more.
After it feels a bit more familiar to you, that's the time to try on Tessa for real.

What clipper do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Keep in mind a couple of things.

It doesn't have to be done all at the same time. Tessa won't care (so long as you don't laugh too much at the look lol).

Practice the moves first. It helps if you have a full cover for the blade teeth, or a guard comb or just take the blade off. Start with the clipper off and practice. Next, with the cover or comb still on, turn the clipper on and practice more.
After it feels a bit more familiar to you, that's the time to try on Tessa for real.

What clipper do you have?
Good tips; I will try that! I think I will go for the base of the tail first when I actually try, as it seems the least difficult and least time-consuming.
We have the Wahl Arco cordless clipper (in purple to match her collar ;)).
 

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My boys are fine with body clipping and the sanitaries but face and feet are a "don't touch that" challenge still. We get thru tho, slowly :).

If you want some video's to review I recommend Sue Zecco for a couple of reasons. She's well qualified and uses Wahl 5 in 1 clippers similar to your Arco. I've got some links saved, or just search for "Sue Zecco poodles" to get the poodle specific videos. I watch her not only for the clipping instruction but also to watch how she manipulates the clippers.

I'd suggest the 10 or 9 setting for your first tries. You'd probably need to use that setting for the tail and sani anyhow so start with that and take it closer when you're both ready and if you feel it's needed.
 
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