Poodle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
3 things actually:

First of all:

My Terrier mix has the tendency to chew on her id tags, mostly her rabies tag. And she has chewed it up pretty good. Um, are they making the rabies tags out of a weaker metal now? I'm just wondering because she has never been able to chew up a tag, and the rabies tag she hasn't had very long and its chewed up pretty bad, and it seems before they looked like they were a different metal and they seemed stronger. And by the way she doesn't chew her actual id name tag just her rabies tag.

Second of all:

We took my Terriers collar off after her bath and just left it off for awhile and she managed to go over to my poodle and He let her chew on his rabies tag. He doesn't chew tags.

Why would he just let her do it? And how to stop this behavior? Now last night he did get upset with her and did try to fight her off.


Also when my Terrier gets upset she will walk around with her tags in her mouth like she is walking herself or something. (she is nervous by nature at times, I think its the Chi in her....but not nearly as nervous as my poodle is)


3rd of all:

Total change in both my dogs personalities. Zachary (my poodle) I am very proud of him because he seems to be growing up and maturing and a lot of his negative behaviors are gone (including the throwing up in his crate when we leave and barking and whining)
But he has gotten more clingy to me and that worries me. I mean I don't treat him any different than ever, I don't baby him. Infact I've gotten a lot more strict in the last few months than I have ever been. But the fact that he has grown more clingy to me, makes me fear some jealousy issues are on the rise when the baby gets here. (And baby could come any time according to doc)

This change has been in the last few weeks but has been most noticeable in the last 5 or 6 days. So needless to say I am concerned this is going to be a problem.

How do I address it and how do I fix it? Should I just continue to observe?

He has made so much progress in other areas, I can walk him out and about now and not worry about how he is going to other dogs and even rowdy children (he has always been good with calm children he knows, but not rowdy strangers)

I can leave the house without worrying he is going to throw up, pee, and/or poop in his crate. I can eat a meal without him sitting in front of me and begging. He can go into petstores now and not make a fuss. We can watch a movie or a show with a dog on it and he doesn't go nuts at it anymore. And he doesn't try to pick fights with Sasha. And he isn't a nervous wreck all the time anymore either, he seems to have a lot more confidence.

He is doing so good, but this newfound clingyness worries me.


As far as Sasha goes (My 23lb Terrier mix who thinks she is a 4lb lap dog) totally opposite. She has always been very loving and very affectionate. She has never met a stranger, she has always been a bit nervous. She graduated top of her obedience class, we continue to work on her basics everyday same as Zack, because they can forget. And I know training is a lifetime thing. She has never been one to disobey or rebell.

She has become rather standoffish, She will just all the sudden get up and move to the other side of the room and sit there and stare at us for like 10 minutes and then start pacing. Over near our daughters stuff. She is becoming rather antisocial, she has been less friendly to Zack and kind of intimidating to him and her other doggy friends. She is acting more like a bratty middle child than the well trained terrier she really is.

She has been more on edge, hair sticking up on her back and neck and her pacing by the doors all nervous and barking under her breath. (She has always had a bit of a nervous nature, possible the chi in her or maybe because of her rough start) She has become very demanding toward my husband, who doesn't give in to her demands though she tries to challenge him. She has become very possesive over toys and bones all the sudden too.

Both dogs get plenty of exercise but most of the time are pretty lazy acting.

We aren't treating them any different than we ever have, we stick to their training and routine as best as possible.

I don't know what is making Sasha so nervous.

Maybe she is sensing the impending changes with the baby coming and all. Honestly this started a few days ago with Sasha, when I started having more contractions, maybe she can sense the contractions and my discomfort?

Maybe they both are?


________________________________________________

Any imput or advice on any of this would be much appreciated. Just slightly concerned and have very little time to turn it around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
As far as Sasha goes its just weird and sudden behavior, she is also kind of ignoring us when we give her a command, something she has never done.

This is all sudden behavior and we are bit confused and concerned and not sure what triggered it and ofcouse as far as Zachary goes I worry about jealousy now.

And the tag thing just kind of is weird

Sasha has always been very submissive with us and other dogs, never a bully, and rather timid and shy. But lately she has been more bold which is a concern and it concerns me when she starts to bully zack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,645 Posts
Oh I highly suggest you read this article on the leerburg website concerning dogs and babies. I think he's right on in putting the baby WAY above the dog and not letting it have contact at all with the baby. Cesar Milan has this same view about babies and dogs so I think that many dog trainers and behaviorists like to use preventative measures.
http://leerburg.com/dogs-babies.htm

As far as the rest of the behaviors, you might be acting different and not know it. How often are they crated when you are home? Sometimes it's good to put them in their spot and move around your house without them. They need some time to learn how to be alone. Wish I could be more help. I haven't been pregnant with a dog before so I don't know how differently they act around pregnant people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
We don't crate Sasha at all, we got rid of her crate about 6 months ago, Zachary is only crated at dinner time (and not really crated just behind a gate) and Sasha is in the same room as him but behind a gate, Zachary is crated though every time we leave as always. Sasha is behind a gate but has pretty much free run of the room she is in when we leave. She wouldn't be gated in at all if we didn't live in an apartment where maintence has come in to do work unannounced. Don't want to risk her running out the door and us not being here. We live in a small apartment so they are either gated in our bedroom or in our master closet.


I really started noticing it the last few days, it was rather sudden. Nothing really seemed to lead up to it. They were both their normal selves one day and then the next this weird behavior. I've never seen dogs change behavior over night ever, but this time it seems they have.


KPOOS: Just letting you know I am not a big fan of Cesar or his techniques. But I will read the article.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,481 Posts
You know I don't think kpoos was giving you a Cesar lesson she was providing you with a tool that a trainer has written and mentioned Cesar relating similar information.

PRF - just a thought to keep in mind, you do post a good deal on different bahavior issues with your dog - so maybe can keep an open mind on who's techniques you try versus throwing a negative comment at someone trying to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
A few questions about the article:

2 - Get a dog crate and crate train the dog. The crate should NEVER be in the bedroom. If the dog becomes overly excited when the baby cries it can be put in the crate. Give it a bone or a rubber Kong with a little cream cheese or peanut butter in middle to keep him interested and busy.
Their crates have always been in our bedroom, technically their crates are in our master closet. Its a huge walk in closet. Also both dogs are crate trained but we got rid of Sashas crate a long time ago, we figured she didn't need one anymore. Anyways we have such a small place we have no where else to put them.

3 - Never allow the dog in the baby’s bedroom - not even when you are present. The bedrooms (including your own) should always be off limits. This is especially true of the baby’s room.
The babys room is our room, technically our room and the dining room. Her bed is in our room but all her stuff, her changer, and toys are all in the dining room. (right outside our room)

So are we to just keep them pinned up all the time, because according to this that is what would have to be done. Because we have such a small space.

(this is obviously written for those who have a bigger place than we do)


This is where I am confused:

The dog IS NOT ALLOWED to smell the baby. Dogs have an excellent sense of smell. There is no reason to allow the dog to come up and smell the baby as soon as it gets home from the hospital. The dog can smell the baby from across the room without any problem.


According to our vet and our trainer this is the exacct opposite of what you should do, because they need to see and sniff the baby while under the control of one of the owners. If they don't get to sniff and see the baby jealousy issues will occur.

So this is what confuses me the most about this article.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
The article isn't Cesar Millan's, it's Leerberg. She's just saying CS has the same attitude toward babies and dogs. Baby should be as much a pack leader as the adults in the family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You know I don't think kpoos was giving you a Cesar lesson she was providing you with a tool that a trainer has written and mentioned Cesar relating similar information.
PRF - just a thought to keep in mind, you do post a good deal on different bahavior issues with your dog - so maybe can keep an open mind on who's techniques you try versus throwing a negative comment at someone trying to help.

I won't keep an open mind on anything that is cesar milan related. And Zachary has overcome many of his behavior issues. Now that he has the proper tools and fundamentals. And I know this isn't a cesar thing, just letting you all know that I don't agree with cesars training so best to stay away from his techniques in my opinion
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
The no smelling the baby is about dominance. If you allow the dog to sniff the baby, you're placing the dog above the baby in the pecking order. It's a very submissive gesture for a dog to submit to being sniffed by another dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The no smelling the baby is about dominance. If you allow the dog to sniff the baby, you're placing the dog above the baby in the pecking order. It's a very submissive gesture for a dog to submit to being sniffed by another dog.

Yes but many times not letting the dogs around the baby causes more issues
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,481 Posts
I won't keep an open mind on anything that is cesar milan related. And Zachary has overcome many of his behavior issues. Now that he has the proper tools and fundamentals
You took the CM comment and took it way out of context, and it wasn't a CM article. :eek:hwell: When you are provided ideas you always have a reason as to why things will not work for you.......so maybe you might want to exlain what you wont listen to when you ask for advise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,481 Posts
There was NOTHING in that section about dominance - and had everyone read it carefully before jumping to conclusions, they said YES they can smell the baby and advised taking a baby blanket or diaper from the hospital prior to baby coming home so the dog can get familiar with the baby - ALSO the point behind this is so the dog requests permission to go up to the new baby an NOT on its own - because as we all know this is a slow process and dogs can go either way....if not done carefully.

There were some great things in the article, FORGET Cesar Millan - and take whats best for you, if not attempt other things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
Dogs smelling is like our looking. Smelling a baby is NOT about dominating babies!! They are gathering information about this new thing in their house. Would you not allow someone to look at a baby? That is like telling a dog they cant sniff a baby.
I think this whole dominance thing has gottin a little out of control. Dogs every single move is not about dominance!
And I wasn't saying it is. She was saying she didn't understand why it might not be a good idea to let the dog smell the baby, and I was offering the most logical reason. Not every dog is dominant, but some dogs are. What that paragraph said was that dogs are perfectly capable of smelling the baby without putting their nose right on it.

Anyway, emotions seem to be running high on this thread, so I'll wish PRF good luck with it all and excuse myself from it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,972 Posts
"The dog should never be allowed in the bedroom."

Sorry but that's just silly. It may be good for a dog w/ behavioral problems or a dog that is just naturally dominant, but that's not every dog. Harley's crate has been in my room for over 5 years. (I started him off in the kitchen b/c I didn't want to be tempted into letting him out when he whined as a puppy. I've also heard dogs may whine more if they know you're in the room.) Not to pat myself on the back but he is an awesome dog and has never challenged me in any way. Bailey sleeps in my room too. If it's cold he sleeps in the bed (at my feet) and if it's warm he is on the floor on his bed. I wouldn't call him dominant either, though he does have some lingering behavioral issues from before I got him. I don't think where he sleeps affects those issues at all.

I'm honestly leery of any trainer that uses phrases like "never or always." There is no one size fits all when it comes to dog training.

However, like I said, my guys are well behaved. If you're having problems, you should look at what you're doing and decided if it's really working for you. Maybe you need a different approach or a different trainer all together. If your coming here instead of going to your trainer for behavioral advice, how much faith do you really have in him/her?

Oh and I would consider getting rid of the tags, at least while the dogs are at home. That situation could get dangerous; what if Sasha gets her tooth caught in her own or Zachary's collar? It happens more than you think and the dogs can be seriously injured or even choke to death. Tags can also get caught on the bars/door of a dog crate or a baby gate. Take the collars off (when at home) and/or look into alternatives for ID tags. They make id tags that rivet onto the collar and sit flush, there are embroidered collars, tag bags or you could always attach them to a harness. They don't really need the rabies tags on their collars anyway. If something were to happen, the authorities are going to want to see the rabies certificate. You could always attach them to a harness or directly to the leash if want them w/ you on walks/potty breaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,645 Posts
Okay I had no idea you were so ANTI Cesar Milan so even though the article I posted wasn't his site at all (if you look around you will see that this man has over 20 years experience with training dogs so is very qualified to offer advice) I just meant that Cesar has a similar view on not letting the dog go into the baby's room and so forth.

I have made a big booboo by letting my dogs in my room. Learn from my mistakes. I was allowing Harry in my room and Mia's crate is in my room as well. Well, my computer isn't working so I'm using my husband's laptop out of our master. So he follows me all over the house but the kids stay in their rooms and in their playroom and do their thing. Well, what do you think this created for Harry? It created a world where he was above the children in rank in his pack because he was always right next to his alpha. Totally and completely my fault and I didn't even realize I was doing anything wrong until I realized that he sort of just went wherever he wanted in the house.

I don't think the dominance thing has gotten out of hand at all. I think people are becomming more aware of what dog's behaviors mean and realizing that yes dogs will take what's given to them so if you offer up rank in your pack or leadership in your pack they will take it. They NEED it to feel secure so if it's not given or direction isn't given, they will just take it and do what they will.

PRF, good luck with your dogs. I have no idea what is causing their behaviors but yes they are starting with some negative behaviors and I'd nip it in the bud before your baby comes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
to the person who asked why I am asking on here and not my trainer...we don't have a trainer anymore, not since my Terriers CGC class (and he was a behaviorist.) But both trainers we had talked about that. The behaviorist though did walk us through introductions (I was already pg). But that was about 7 months ago. We currently don't have a trainer/behaviorist that we use
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,737 Posts
Just a guess on my part, but I think the dogs can sense something BIG is about to happen with you and might even realize you are pregnant. They are amazing how they can sense things.

I saw a Victoria Stillwell show where they were preparing for baby to come home. They used a baby doll and did the things you would normally do with a baby to get the dogs accustomed to your switch in focus from them to the child. She also used sound to simulate a baby's crying to help the dogs know how to react.

I don't have any experience to share.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
I would expect your dogs to pick on your hormone changes as well as picking up on your stress and anxiety even if you aren't even aware you are stressed. Heck, if a poodle can smell cancer they can certainly tell something life changing is going on.

I knew my youngest son was going to be born soon because my spoo was SO cingy and developed some bad nervous habits. I allowed the clingyness but not the bad habits. Just because he was stressed didn't mean he got a free ride. As soon as my son was born the clingyness faded. My spoo was with me during two pregnancies even though he was just a pup himself the first time. He grew up around young children so it was no big deal when I brought my youngest home. I had him snuffel my baby (now 5) and that was that. I even have photos of my son as a newborn curled up in my spoo's curly hair. Schop knew his place in the pack and never pushed it wit the kids. He was protective of them and even tought my youngest how to walk. Dartagnan, my son, would grab Scop's side, wrap his fingers in he curls and toddle around with him.

My experience was by no means what every family experiences certainly, but just know that this baby affects your dogs almost as much as it does you. You know your family dynamics so have to make your own decisions. It sounds like your dogs are stressed, hence the obcessive tag chewing and clingness, and are trying to deal with what is happening. Even so, they need to remeber who the top dog is, you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
It does sounds like your dogs are smelling the change in your hormones, the more oddly behaved your dogs are, probably relates to the dogs knowing you are about to give birth, use this as a guide to get babies bed ready! It's because the dogs are concerned about you, I would imagine that you are the person in the house that is most in tune with there needs, they know this and are concerned, if you are out of action who will look after them! If you did not mean much to them they would not behave like they are. The training of seizure assist dogs for example plays on this human dog bond, dogs are wise they know when they are on to a good thing, food on their plate a warm bed, toys to play with and walks, they should be fine when you get back home with baby they will understand what just happened. Make sure you still show them you are their link to a good life and they will respect you, a good leader, protects, finds food, and knows what his followers are feeling. Dogs are not that much different from humans just more logical and down to earth!
Lots of stuff out their on best way to introduce a new member to the pack, you need to find the way that suit you and your dogs best.
Best wishes for your delivery, take care of yourself.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top