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Discussion Starter #1
Here I am - haven't even got my Mini yet and I am still wondering about adding a Standard in the future.

I have heard that Standards are "hyper". However, I guess that is a subjective thing. My agility instructor lost his Dobe to heart failure a few months ago and he is getting -- a blue Dobe puppy and a black Standard puppy both at the same time. Sounds like lots of work to me but anyway, he said he has heard that Standards are "lively" so really to some people lively might be the same as hyper.

I did see a woman about my age with a black Standard at a beginner obedience and I would have called the dog hyper. I went up to talk to the woman and the dog was flayling its front legs in the air and she had trouble controlling it.

A long time friend who bred Shepherds, American Cockers and Shih-tzus over many years advised me against a Standard because she said they are big strong dogs and I would have trouble controlling the dog. She is making this comment because she is an obedience trainer and has seen many "hyper" Standards. However, what is "lively" to a 30 year old might be "hyper" to a 60 year old.

I am wondering what people who actually know Poodles have to comment about Standard Poodle temperament.
 

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I can easily see that what is 'lively' in a miniature can translate to 'hyper' in a bigger dog. There is a standard in my obedience class who does no more leaping in the air than my mini, but it has more impact because of his size.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can easily see that what is 'lively' in a miniature can translate to 'hyper' in a bigger dog. There is a standard in my obedience class who does no more leaping in the air than my mini, but it has more impact because of his size.
Yes, I can definitely see that. My shih-tzus are lively, but because they are small, they don't have the same impact -- in fact Tyson is totally hyper when I put his food down. But again - he is about a foot tall!!

BTW whereabouts in Surrey do you live? I grew up in Purley.
 

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I am 59, have had dogs of many breeds, consider myself a dog savvy, intelligent, capable, able bodied dog person. I got a Standard who was 4 months old last year, she is now 14 months. Spoos were bred as hunting retrievers. I think a lot of people forget that. They are high energy dogs, to me that is not hyper or lively, they were bred to be smart and work. That IS a lot to handle and train. Everyone who drools over my seemingly well behaved dog is told that she is a LOT of work. When I got her I made a commitment to try to make sure she was given lots of exercise and mental challenges. I think I accomplish what she needs at about 33%, and that takes most of my time. She goes with me every day, gets walked, does agility training, horses around with my 3 yr old energizer bunny Crested. Still, I do believe that she will turn out to be a terrific dog when she is 3 or 4. She is terrific now, but I do daily remind her many times that she needs to calm down. She is already twice the agility dog my Crested is, but I didn't devote my days to the Crested. I personally believe that if you are going to get a SPoo, you need to be prepared to devote yourself to their upbringing for 2-3 years.
 

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I am 59, have had dogs of many breeds, consider myself a dog savvy, intelligent, capable, able bodied dog person. I got a Standard who was 4 months old last year, she is now 14 months. Spoos were bred as hunting retrievers. I think a lot of people forget that. They are high energy dogs, to me that is not hyper or lively, they were bred to be smart and work. That IS a lot to handle and train. Everyone who drools over my seemingly well behaved dog is told that she is a LOT of work. When I got her I made a commitment to try to make sure she was given lots of exercise and mental challenges. I think I accomplish what she needs at about 33%, and that takes most of my time. She goes with me every day, gets walked, does agility training, horses around with my 3 yr old energizer bunny Crested. Still, I do believe that she will turn out to be a terrific dog when she is 3 or 4. She is terrific now, but I do daily remind her many times that she needs to calm down. She is already twice the agility dog my Crested is, but I didn't devote my days to the Crested. I personally believe that if you are going to get a SPoo, you need to be prepared to devote yourself to their upbringing for 2-3 years.
This post could have been written by me! LOL! Withe the exception that i am still at the 5 month old stage and have had Hoolie for a month. I was not totally prepared for his energy level though i was aware of their retriever origins.... but am sure Im up to it :) He is just sooo smart! He is with me all the time as I am retired and we just stated obedience classes and plan to continue training at whatever interests us and is fun! I have been doing a lot of looking on the internet to find ideas fun things to do with him...he is quite a change from my Couch Potato Greyhound I lost recently. I am hooping he will be able to qualify as a therapy dog in the future.
 

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Yes, I can definitely see that. My shih-tzus are lively, but because they are small, they don't have the same impact -- in fact Tyson is totally hyper when I put his food down. But again - he is about a foot tall!!

BTW whereabouts in Surrey do you live? I grew up in Purley.
I did wonder about your nickname! We're in Dorking; Purley isn't too far. It's such a great place to have a dog. We are busy trying to walk all the footpaths in Surrey, which Vasco thinks is a great plan.

That's exactly what I meant .... the same behaviour in a big dog has more impact than in a small dog. Mine leaps straight up in the air and makes it to my waist. A standard I know leaps straight in the air and is over his owner's head!
 

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It is frustrating to me when people lump all of one variety of poodle into one pigeonhole...

Not ALL standards are high energy (just as, I'm sure, not ALL minis and toys are yappy!) The two standards who live in my house are not high energy, or lively, or hyper (unless WE tell them to be by taking them outside and starting something lively) otherwise the girls are ever so happy to lounge with us when we're ready to lounge... I believe it is an individual personality thing and a training thing much, much more than a "standard" thing (if that makes any sense whatsoever...) :lol:
 

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I believe it is an individual personality thing and a training thing much, much more than a "standard" thing (if that makes any sense whatsoever...) :lol:
Hear, hear.

Add age to that.

We met two lovely standard 'Grandes Dames' while out walking this past weekend ... very dignified and quite above the cavorting of the annoying little miniature that was enthralled with them. :)
 

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It is frustrating to me when people lump all of one variety of poodle into one pigeonhole...

Not ALL standards are high energy (just as, I'm sure, not ALL minis and toys are yappy!) The two standards who live in my house are not high energy, or lively, or hyper (unless WE tell them to be by taking them outside and starting something lively) otherwise the girls are ever so happy to lounge with us when we're ready to lounge... I believe it is an individual personality thing and a training thing much, much more than a "standard" thing (if that makes any sense whatsoever...) :lol:
Perfect description of my spoos!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did wonder about your nickname! We're in Dorking; Purley isn't too far. It's such a great place to have a dog. We are busy trying to walk all the footpaths in Surrey, which Vasco thinks is a great plan.

That's exactly what I meant .... the same behaviour in a big dog has more impact than in a small dog. Mine leaps straight up in the air and makes it to my waist. A standard I know leaps straight in the air and is over his owner's head!
Yes, I really miss that. When my Mom was alive and active she had a Border Terrier and we would walk down the driveway of the house in Kent, through the gateway into the orchard and a dog could have a wonderful time there. Unfortunately its not the same on the prairies. Over here people walk their dogs on a leash - mostly on the city streets I think. Luckily I have a big yard but nothing like the freedom of the Surrey woods from my growing up days - or the Kent woods later on!

I am surely hoping my Mini isn't a yapper. I won't put up with that. My neighbours have a yapper - I am pretty sure they shut it outside the back door - and lots of dogs would yap in that situation!
 

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I have seen and know some very hyper standards, but i think for the most part they are just high energy. Rileys bestest friend Nico is an extreamly hyper standard! Nico wont sit still when we are there, and has to constantly be doing something. He has an obsession with licking Riley, all over and wont stop! Just cant settle, and he is 8 years old now.

Riley was high energy as a younger dog, and sometimes still is. I think you can get a more mellow or a more high energy standard depending on what lines your dog has and what you want from them. I am looking for a focused, yet high energy performance dog. Not hyper though. Alot depends on training. I consider hyper being not able to focus, and there is a big difference with a high energy focused dog.
 

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Minis in general are not yappers. Captain will occasionally bark, but only when my real barker is outside. She barks at EVERYTHING, and he thinks, "Ooo fun game, let's bark!" If he is out alone, he very rarely barks, unless he is wanting to come in, or someone is RIGHT outside the fence.
Now the lively thing, he is totally lively. Our mini is a total athlete. He can run through the house and then he starts doing things like vaulting tables and chairs and kids :lol: He can jump into my husband's (6'4") arms with a running leap. I can see how a standard with similar activity level could be called hyper.
 

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Ginger our spoo is 3, she loves to run and play but she also spends lots of time on her back, all 4 in the air!! Compared to the Border Collie, she is quiet. Keelyn's 11 and can still run circles, literally, around Ginger. But they both get a good long run in the field, up a hill and down again and in and out play in the yard during the day. Either one of them can get into trouble if left too long and get bored but so can kids and cats.
 

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2 of mine are so happy to meet people, they stand on their back legs and paw the air with their front legs. The other 2 stand quietly and just wag tails. They all are wild at a dog park....not what I consider unmanagable but still quite a handful. My 9 year old is ladylike and occasionally ZOOMIE but the 8 year old standard acts like a 1 year old. I truly do screen potential buyers....too old is a MILD red flag. I would only sell to someone over 65 if they already owned standards. They act young and frisky for several years.
 

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i hve a friend who's mom (In brandon) has a standard. When she heard i was looking she thought i ws insane. OMG she says they are so off the wall insanely hyper.

now keep in mind- both of us breed aussies. So our idea of 'high energy" has huge amounts of drive.

She met bella and went WOW This is such a different temperment. Bella is what i'd consider normal temperment- She's bouncey- when she's excited (Supper time) she's boing boing boing... but she's not in your face about it- it's off in her corner (VS the aussies which are boin boing boing off of you) She'll play just as long as my aussie- but isn't nearly as intense while doing it....

but she's also much much more content at this age to just CHILL then any aussie pup i've worked with
 

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Yes, I really miss that. When my Mom was alive and active she had a Border Terrier and we would walk down the driveway of the house in Kent, through the gateway into the orchard and a dog could have a wonderful time there. Unfortunately its not the same on the prairies. Over here people walk their dogs on a leash - mostly on the city streets I think. Luckily I have a big yard but nothing like the freedom of the Surrey woods from my growing up days - or the Kent woods later on!

I am surely hoping my Mini isn't a yapper. I won't put up with that. My neighbours have a yapper - I am pretty sure they shut it outside the back door - and lots of dogs would yap in that situation!
Yes, Britain really is fantastic for dogs. Dogs on leashes for safety, either near roads or if they don't come when called, but otherwise everyone is very relaxed about off-lead dogs and the dogs quickly learn to get along with other dogs. Mine will go and say hi to another dog when we're out on a walk, then come straight back. We're very lucky where we are; we cross a quiet road to a big park, then another 1/4 mile in any direction puts us in fields and woods.

I'm from the US originally, and one of the things I don't miss is the leash Nazis! I had a well-behaved Golden in the US, and the number of people who felt compelled to educate me on leash laws was astonishing. Even in deep woods, I'd run across hikers who would tell me off.

Re the barking, I very consciously never taught my mini to bark on command, nor to bark to go out, and he's very quiet now. Only barks when his ball is under the sofa or when he's playing with another dog. So you are probably safe on the yappy front.

Border Terriers are GREAT! One of my dog's best mates is a female Border; they wrestle for hours.
 

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My mini is not a yapper (he's actually very quiet) and I would not call him hyper, I would call him lively and busy. He's very smart and athletic and has a ton of energy. He will play fetch all day long if you let him. But he's small (13 pounds) and also still a puppy (8 months).

I really think it's all about training, exercise and attention. Provide enough of all three and you are most likely going to have a very well-behaved, pleasant companion.
 

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I have an active Standard and an excitable standard, but neither I would call hyper.

My active boy gets his bouts of craziness where he leaps into the air, and bounces from the couch to his bed, up the stairs, down the stairs, repeat, but those moments are few and far between and indicate to me that he still has some energy in a tank.

My excitable boy would likely be described as hyper if they only met him once. With his favourite people, he gets a full body wag going, and mouths and mouths your arms all over, and gets all worked up just by saying "hi Matrix!"

That said, both of my boys are QUIET and settled in the house. They are happy to sleep by my feet or in their bed, or in the bathroom while I'm busy. They're EXTREMELY strong, and if they REALLY wanted to get at a squirrel or something, they COULD pull me down, and I am far from a weakling.
That's why training is so important. A well trained spoo will not give you much if any trouble while walking.
 

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It is frustrating to me when people lump all of one variety of poodle into one pigeonhole...

Not ALL standards are high energy (just as, I'm sure, not ALL minis and toys are yappy!) The two standards who live in my house are not high energy, or lively, or hyper (unless WE tell them to be by taking them outside and starting something lively) otherwise the girls are ever so happy to lounge with us when we're ready to lounge... I believe it is an individual personality thing and a training thing much, much more than a "standard" thing (if that makes any sense whatsoever...) :lol:
I have to totally agree here, I have a toy and a standard and neither are "typical" description of the variety. My toy is NOT yappy at all, I mean she barks she's a dog, but she does not bark excessively because I have taught her from a young age the quiet command. My standard can be...exuberant..she tends to get the "zoomies" sometimes, but for the most part both of my girls are VERY laid back. Amber (FrostFire) can attest to that lol! So, it is a training thing I think although just like any animal, personality can have an impact on how difficult it is to train them.
 
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