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Poodlekid is now almost 11 months old and we have had a great and peaceful last two or three months. We were done with teething and mouthing for the most part. Toilet training is complete and we have settled into a nice routine. BUT now all of a sudden we are revisiting all out worst behaviors for another spin that evidently require new solutions. Problem one was screaming - which had been dealt with and has been modified into muttering and whining which we are working on. Problem two is now all of sudden a new version of separation anxiety. Louie doesn't like staying behind (who does) but while he used to holler for about 30 seconds and then be fine he now hollers for the length of the stay and makes an insane fuss when we actually leave (that's the new thing). I am switching up routines - I have put on my boots twice without going anywhere - I keep switching my keys from place to place and I will install a gate to restrict his access to the hall way. He had the run of the Living Room for about two months (maybe too soon) - when he stayed alone - which seemed fine because he was chill and didn't chew or soil or any other behavior, BUT I may have inadvertently given him control over the hallway and therefor the front door and therefor who comes and goes. So back to the kitchen for him during alone time. I have consulted my training books and this seems most likely to be the culprit. Such complicated little creatures these Poodles! I have a strategy in place but I still marvel at the complexity of the Poodle Psyche!
 

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If I have to go somewhere and leave Zephyr behind he gets a frozen chicken neck which keeps him busy and entertained for a few minutes, and by the time he is done chewing that up the emotional impact of me leaving is over. Any special treat that takes a little while to eat would work.
 

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If I have to go somewhere and leave Zephyr behind he gets a frozen chicken neck which keeps him busy and entertained for a few minutes, and by the time he is done chewing that up the emotional impact of me leaving is over. Any special treat that takes a little while to eat would work.
yep will stock up on chicken feet - which he loves and have been very helpful with his patella issues. They are also soft enough that there should be no issue and I know after months of observing him that he can handle these with absolutely no problem. I never advocate to leave a dog unsupervised when chewing - UNTIL you know for sure he knows what he is doing.
 

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I agree about supervising when chewing bones. Every once in a while something can go wrong. I take away all their toys that could possibly break into pieces and no bones when I'm not around to watch. Funny thing about dogs...they don't pout. They wait it out. When I get home, they dance about. haha. :act-up:

I'd steer clear of animal necks. They often have thyroid hormone in them because the thyroid gland sits right there on the neck. Dogs can get very ill or die from hyperthyroidism caused by ingesting too much this hormone. Necks, gullet, trachea...all risky.:afraid:

https://drjeandoddspethealthresource.tumblr.com/post/44184852022/dietary-dog-hyperthyroidism

It's been found in some commercial foods where they included animal necks...and there have been recalls. So, hopefully, they're watching that more now.https://www.idexx.com/en/blogs/pulse/recall-alert-beef-thyroid-hormone-in-dog-food/
 
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I would have to do research or maybe someone here knows more about this, but I think the birds' thyroid hormone comes by way of the pituitary gland. So, I'm not sure how it works with the thyroid gland itself. Or if there's a whole lot of the hormone in the necks or not. It's probably that there's more in beef of course and that's when dogs were having problems. But just in case....

Here's another article.

https://therawfeedingcommunity.com/2017/03/02/can-raw-diets-cause-hyperthyroidism/

It's not the fact that it's a raw diet. It's feeding necks, tracheas, gullet etc that is the culprit. Not a very good title, is it?
 
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I would have to do research or maybe someone here knows more about this, but I think the birds' thyroid hormone comes by way of the pituitary gland. So, I'm not sure how it works with the thyroid gland itself. Or if there's a whole lot of the hormone in the necks or not. It's probably that there's more in beef of course and that's when dogs were having problems. But just in case....

Here's another article.

https://therawfeedingcommunity.com/2017/03/02/can-raw-diets-cause-hyperthyroidism/

It's not the fact that it's a raw diet. It's feeding necks, tracheas, gullet etc that is the culprit. Not a very good title, is it?
I don't ever do necks for that very reason.
 

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I have to laugh..Renn turned 12 months early Dec. He also is exhibiting behavior which I thought was gone. We do nice walks, then suddenly he will bark and leap and jump, hasn't done that one in a long time, but a few weeks ago we started. I noticed it was in one area of our walk but I found magic, pieces of kraft american cheese..he gets a sniff and back into his walk, if he continues he will get a piece, then suddenly his focus is on me we do a few loops and circles and continue on when we get to driveway he must sit in position, he has tried just a anywhere sit and I stand there look fat him touch my side and he leaps into a proper side heel sit, cheese....seems we need some reminding...He has also decided to steal anything his nose can touch on counter, re working "not yours". also he has started to whine in his crate whenever I am nearby, before he was sleeping with paws in the air. I'm ignoring this until I decide its time to once again come out. He wants to be by me constantly. I don't mind that but can't allow it. He is also sniffing at everything he can and by other dogs are marking wherever he has peed. So a week from tomorrow...vet time, he will get his neuter. Friday groom, Tuesday final clip.
 

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Someone here suggested a walk before alone time (may have been on another thread with separation anxiety) wow - what a difference that makes. Louie doesn't really have the typical separation anxiety either - sure he would rather be with me than not, but what he is really on about is that he is not allowed to come and socialize. So when we do the walk before - I guess he figures - at least he was a part of THAT walk and then he will let me have one on my own.
 

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I try to have low key departures and returns. The last thing I want is door drama, especially overly exuberant reunions. I leave with “Watch the house” and return with “I always come back.” Buck unfortunately went from teenager to know it all, college frat boy. A protracted adolescence, despite neutering. Keep up the good fight:)
 

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Renn is actually fine in his crate. I just say crate, he goes in I lock the door, go about my business and leave when I'm ready. I never knowledge comings or goings.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Both my husband and I know better than to announce comings or goings or to add exuberance to departure or arrivals. The Pooodlekid adds the drama all by himself. We truly have had so many dogs in a row with zero separation issues that this phase is taking us a little by surprise. We have made some adjustments which have resulted in a lot of improvement in a short time. We have added a walk before leaving which reduces his anxiety of not coming along tremendously. He is back in the kitchen where we had started with leaving alone training and we are working on restricting his access to the hallway (which is a toughie because he also has to go pee using that hallway). What we have done so far is restrict his view to the outside (we have a partially glass front door) - in the end it comes down to control over the hallway which in his poodle mind is also control over peoples' coming and going. This is just another amusing chapter, but the little 11 pound Poodle is certainly giving us - two very experienced dog owners - a whole number of new challenges.
 

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LOL Well it sounds like its pretty under control, eat least he is 11 lbs and not 50+ like mine, makes it a bit easier to manage, maybe LOL. Renn is just so full of himself lately, our nice walks are more challenging if something excites him, like another dog being excited. Last night he was just in an excited mood, he corrected himself several times while we walked, my daughter accompanied us, she was afraid I'd fall and then my neighbor joined us and he settled until we came upon a house with a loose GSD on their front lawn who started barking , thankfully the owner came out and had one of her teenage children hold his collar while we walked by. By thats all it takes our nice walk became an exuberant walk. Not fun anymore, my walks are getting shorter because so many neighbors don't control their dogs. Need to get my legs working better. Hopefully his neutering will help some too. I've never waited this long to get a dog neutered so I'm really not sure if it has anything to do with it.
 

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I’ve never had a dog that knew I was leaving before I was at the door until I got Buck! He notices every change. Thank goodness, he didn’t have the drama skills of your guy:)
 

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I'd steer clear of animal necks. They often have thyroid hormone in them because the thyroid gland sits right there on the neck. Dogs can get very ill or die from hyperthyroidism caused by ingesting too much this hormone. Necks, gullet, trachea...all risky.:afraid:

https://drjeandoddspethealthresource.tumblr.com/post/44184852022/dietary-dog-hyperthyroidism

It's been found in some commercial foods where they included animal necks...and there have been recalls. So, hopefully, they're watching that more now.
Thank you Poodlebeguiled. I feed raw and had not known about this! Fortunately I do not feed necks. The link here (plus your others) has really good information. I thought it was especially interesting that ground beef can include too much neck meat, and then not be good for either humans or dogs.

I very seldom give him ground beef, but this is really good to know.

I hope some of this information ends up in the poodle food and health sections!
 
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