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Need some helps
Just bought a new puppy yesterday he is 8 weeks old... I'm wondering how long he will take to be trained?
I'm trying To call him with his name so he knows but not he is not really responding yet
I'm trying to give him treats and tell him to set but still not really doing any yet plus his not really eating the treat and it's a puppy one?
I'm working full time so I'm not sure how to keep him doing toilet outside if im going to leave him inside the house he have his play pen to stay inside while I'm not home.
Can someone help me what to do?
 

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Hello, welcome to the forum. We love pictures of puppies.
Congratulations on your new addition. 8 week old pups are just babies and it will take some time for him to settle in, bond with you, and feel safe enough to eat treats and learn. It's better to start things slow and work on helping your pup feel safe and get used to his new environment. You can certainly start with introducing simple commands after he's comfortable with accepting treats, but be very patient. It's better to work on instilling good manners and exposing him slowly to different sights, smells, and sounds around him that will help him to be confident in the world.

If you work full time, you probably want to consider arranging to have somebody visit while you are gone to let your pup out to potty and play with him. A neighbor or friend may be able to stop in, or you can easily hire somebody to do this. Puppies don't do well being left for long periods during the day. You can use pee pads if you have to leave him for a length of time, but these don't replace good potty training and it's much better to do frequent outside trips than rely on pee pads.

As far as training goes, how long it takes depends on your expectations and your dog's personality. It may take only a few days to teach a dog to sit, lie down, and stay, but teaching them to do this around distractions in public is a whole different matter. Most people work most with training for the first 2-3 years of a dog's life, but dogs can continue to learn new things as they get older and they'll keep improving as you work with them.
 

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Hi and Welcome to you and Teddy! Is Teddy your first puppy?

Raindrops is giving good advice. Teddy is just a baby and will be a baby for six months or more. It's a very long time that, looking back, will have gone by very quickly. This is not to say he won't be learning all along the way, but without exercise for his mind and body, he'll be at a disadvantage.

Teddy is as dependent on you as a human infant would be on their parent.

This is a link to a respected trainer's website with extremely good information. The first link is for before you bring your puppy home but is still worth the read.


The second link will be about raising your puppy.


It is very much not ideal to leave a puppy home alone for hours at a time. Particularly if Teddy is a poodle pup, they are very sensitive and thrive on human company. Being left isolated for hours will not allow him to get the physical exercise and mental stimulation he needs to grow and blossom. As Raindrops mentioned, if you can arrange for someone to come over at least one or two times a day, while you're working to let Teddy out of his pen and just be a puppy, it will help him immensely.

Make sure his play pen area is big enough to have the potty pad or pee patch to one side, leaving room for him to play in a small clean area and another area for his water and food. Use only stainless steel or ceramic bowls for food and water. Expect a lot of messes, so make sure you have the pen on a tile or vinyl floor, or put a vinyl tablecloth under the pen, larger than the pen so he won't chew on it.

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Regarding food, is he a toy size? if so, there is a very serious concern for hypoglycemia if he doesn't eat the proper amount for his size. This can be life threatening within a very very short time, minutes even. You must make sure he's eating properly and keep Nutrical on hand to give immediately if he develops symptoms of hypoglycemia.

He may not eat well especially in his first days in his new home. He's just lost everything he knows and will be sad, even as he'll be happy to be with you.

See this thread on that:


Otherwise, if you're familiar with Kong toys, you can put his kibble in it and he will hopefully eat and keep his mind exercised by trying to get the food out.

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Ideally the pen will have vertical slats only. A horizontal bar becomes a foot hold and then you have, at best, a puppy climbing out of the pen, and at worst possibly hurt trying.

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If the playpen has a cover on top, that will help keep Teddy in the pen.

Be very careful about the kinds of toys you leave him alone with. Kong brand is a good choice because they are strong and durable. Teddy is not likely to bite off parts and try to swallow or choke on them.

Don't have a collar on him when he's alone. That's another very serious choking hazard if it gets caught on anything.

If you can manage it, have Teddy sleep in your bedroom. The pups just think they're on an adventure until bedtime, especially the first night, rolls around. Suddenly they realize that NOTHING is familiar, no scent, warmth or comfort of mom or siblings. They are Alone. Ask the breeder to do this or bring a towel or blanket to get mom and siblings scent on it, to comfort them. Keeping them in the same room allows you to hear if they are unwell or need to go out. Expect to have the young ones out several times during the night for a while. Set a periodic alarm to beat them to it.
Don't count on a lot of sleep the first days or weeks. Taking a few days off from work or work from home, if you can, will really help set routines and gives some time to get to know each other. Find out if the breeder had them on a daily routine and try to follow that for a few days. They're facing so many instant and incomprehensible changes. Keep what you can the same for a while.

Puppies do better when there is a routine. As much as possible, do the same things at the same time each day. This will be especially important in the first few months.

Make your training sessions very short, maybe 5 minutes at a time, and do that several times a day. Focus on one thing for those few minutes.

Don't get mad at him for any mistakes he makes. He doesn't know they are mistakes. It's your responsibility as his new family to help him learn in a positive way what's expected of him, and it's up to you to know how to do that.

I know this is a lot of information to give you, but baby puppies need all the help we can give them.

Please stay in touch and ask us anything!!!

We'd love to see a picture of Teddy :)
 

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Good info from Rose n Poos. I highly recommend the Ian Dunbar information she has linked to.

Regarding housebreaking, one of my standard poodles was pretty reliable by 4 months. The other one had a period where he backslide, so he wasn't really trustworthy until 6 months. However, the one that learned early had a habit of submissive peeing until he was almost a year old. Deal with submissive peeing by calmly cleaning up the mess and then moving on to an activity that is less exciting to the puppy. Yelling or punishing the puppy just triggers more submission, which means more peeing. The puppy is TRYING to be good. Doggy instinct is just getting in the way.
 

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Good advice above.

Look in your area for puppy socialization classes. The local Humane Society, animal shelter, or private trainers should be able to help you. Puppies need to be kept away from big dogs until they have good immunity from their vaccines, but they also need to socialize with other dogs during that period and special puppy socialization classes or day cares are a great way to get that important interaction with other puppies and humans. It will lead to a calmer, more confident adult dog.

Once your puppy has settled in after a day or two, he'll be ready for training. Run away from him while calling his name in an excited, squeaky voice. Treat, treat, treat. Move a treat close to his nose and up over his head while saying "sit" and he'll fall into a sit. It won't take long. Many, very short training sessions are perfect for little pups.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Need some helps
Just bought a new puppy yesterday he is 8 weeks old... I'm wondering how long he will take to be trained?
I'm trying To call him with his name so he knows but not he is not really responding yet
I'm trying to give him treats and tell him to set but still not really doing any yet plus his not really eating the treat and it's a puppy one?
I'm working full time so I'm not sure how to keep him doing toilet outside if im going to leave him inside the house he have his play pen to stay inside while I'm not home.
Can someone help me what to do?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for getting back to me,
He is slowly knows us and the kids as I have to boys age 7 and 5 they love playing with him and give him lots of cuddles.
I go back in my lunch time to see him as I'm working nearby..
Now I do toliet outside with him. When I wake up I take him straight awy outside
And when I'm home I take him every 1h To try
Just want to know when he will settle in like no crying when I leave him cause he get upset
And when he is up at night and calling for us what the best option to do
Do I go to him or should i leave him ? I don't want him to go on a habbit that I'm going to go to him at night?
 

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Good to hear he is settling in. I have found it best to have puppies close to me at night - it makes it easy to reassure them, and to know when they really need to go out to toilet. Make it a quick, boring process, and straight back to bed afterwards with no playing. The best way to get him used to you leaving him during the day is to practice it with very brief absences, being very calm and matter of fact about it, so that he learns that it is nothing to worry about and that you will always come back. But remember that he is a baby - remember your children when they were toddlers, and think how they would have reacted to you leaving them: Teddy's emotions are just the same.
 
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First, some very general information, called The Rule of Three

What should I expect?
You can expect that it will take your dog some time getting used to the new routines and adapt to his new environment. The ‘Rule of Three’ means that you can gauge the time it might take for your dog to fully acclimate to his home in threes: three days, three weeks, and three months.

Remember, this is just a general guideline.

At 3 days…
The first 3 days are the initial adjustment period as your dog transitions from their previous home to your home. Your home is new and exciting, with different activity and spaces than they are used to. It can be overwhelming for many dogs.

Your new dog may sleep a lot in those first few days or he may be so amped up
on excitement that he is easily aroused and difficult to settle down. He will want to check out all the new smells and investigate his new digs. He won’t know what you expect from him, where to go potty, or whether he’s allowed on the furniture; he won’t know that your shoe is not actually a chew toy, or that the kitchen trash is not where he is supposed to find his dinner.

These first few days require an immense amount of patience on your part. Take a deep breath and remember that your home is like Disneyland to your new puppy. He will settle in to your routine if you give him time and patience. It won’t happen overnight, and if they're available, attend positive-reinforcement training classes to help him learn better manners, but take comfort in knowing that it gets better!

At 3 weeks…
After 3 weeks, your dog is probably getting used to your comings and goings, learning the daily routine, and starting to figure out when the next meal is coming. He’ll learn that you walk at the same time every morning, and that he gets to go out for regular potty breaks. You’ll start to see more of his true personality and less of his initial response – whether that was fear, excitement, stress or a combination of all three. You will become more familiar with his true personality as it blossoms in his new environment. It won’t be completely smooth sailing, but the bumps in the road will be less frequent and less stressful.

At 3 months…
At 3 months, most dogs know they are “home.” It’s a process to get there, but with patience and a sense of humor, the two of you can scale the mountain together and enjoy the journey toward a great relationship.


Love Has No Age Limit, Drs. Karen London and Patricia McConnell

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That Teddy is crying in the night or when you leave is completely normal at his age. He is just a baby, and as fjm said, his needs are just like a human baby's.

He will cry when scared, when lonely, when hungry, when he needs to eliminate, It's up to you to determine which is causing his distress and then take care of it for him. If he's scared or lonely go to him so he knows you're there. As fjm said, iIf you can manage it, it's so much better to have him in the same room with you at night. You'll know if needs to go out, or if he's ill, or just scared and lonely. This phase of intense needs will diminish as he gets older, and with puppies, that happens much faster than humans.

Regarding his needs for elimination, his internal systems are very small and immature so they can't really "hold" their eliminations reliably til they're around 6 months old.

Until then the general rule is that he'll need to go out at least every 2 hours at 2 months old. He'll also need to go out after every meal, after every drink, after every nap, after every play session, pretty much after anything.
At 3 months, the interval may go up to 3 hours as his internal systems start maturing. The interval can increase by about 1 hour per month of age. This is not a schedule to follow with timers and such, just a guideline.

Until his body matures it's not unusual at all for him to need to eliminate 2-3 times during the night. The good news is that he will grow out of that quickly, comparatively speaking. It will be hard on you, sleep deprivation is a part of puppyhood for most of us :).

As for crying when he's left alone, that's also normal. Do you have any way of knowing if he settles down after a while or if he cries continuously til your return? Fjm's suggestion of very brief absences, just stepping out of the room, or out the front door for only a short time will help him learn that it's normal for you to go, for him to stay, and most importantly, that you will come back! Having the Kong toy with part of his daily food in it can give him something to occupy his attention for a bit. Make sure that no choking hazards are available when no one is there to watch him.

What size is Teddy? Is he a toy or miniature or standard? Each size has different growth rates so this is helpful information for us to know, to help you and Teddy.

Puppies do best on free access to water, which may be withheld only about an hour or so before bedtime if he needs to eliminate very soon after bedtime. They do best on 3 meals a day to help regulate their internal systems and keep nutrients coming at a regular pace til they're at least 6 months old.

If he's crying because he's lonely or scared at night and doesn't necessarily have to eliminate, and if you're not able to keep him in the same room where he can hear and smell you, even have you just reach down to give a gentle stroke, there is something which might help. Some members have used this very successfully.
It's called
SmartPetLove Snuggle Puppy Behavioral Aid Toy
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and is a wonderful tool to help soothe a puppy. I don't know where you all are or what access you have to the retailers I'm used to in the US but I'll put the Amazon link here so you can see the item description.

I don't know why the Amazon links sometimes say "Robot Check" but it is safe to click on. If you'd rather just search online yourself just use the name over the picture.

I would say to reassure him rather than let him cry it out on his own. You want him to learn to trust you to look after him. That's a large part of what the bond between you all will be built from.

Please stay in touch!
 
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