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The vet noticed that Bauer has an unusual amount of tartar build-up on his teeth. He said it is unusual for a 1.5 year old dog to have so much tartar. I have noticed that his breath has been horrid since he was bout 7 months old... I have tried Dentabones and he gets rawhides quite regularily. Could it be the Science Diet food? They gave me a couple sample bags of Medi-Cal food meant to help with tartar. Bauer doesn't like "Big bites" so maybe that is a contributing factor? He has a doggy toothbrush with beef flavored toothpaste but he really hates when I try to brush his teeth. He tries to chew the toothbrush so I can never really get those teeth at the back. I may have to cough up $400 to have him put under anesthetic for a good cleaning.

Have any of you had this done? Is there anything else I should try? I don't mind spending the money if it's really a worthy cause but sometimes I can't help but think the vet might just be trying to make some extra money... Of course I don't want to end up with a rotten-tooth dog but Bauer doesn't seem to be in any pain and if there is an alternative I'd love to hear about it!
 

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Have any of you had this done? Is there anything else I should try? I don't mind spending the money if it's really a worthy cause but sometimes I can't help but think the vet might just be trying to make some extra money... Of course I don't want to end up with a rotten-tooth dog but Bauer doesn't seem to be in any pain and if there is an alternative I'd love to hear about it!
Ooh, sore subject. My poodle is at the vet right now having his teeth cleaned; I hate the idea of him being under anaesthesia, but yes, I think it needs to be done.

Here's the background:

First of all, dog teeth are not so different from human teeth. They get plaque and tartar, and with too much build-up, they get gum disease. Humans brush every day... dog's teeth need to be brushed, too. My vet told me that poodles are particularly susceptible to gum disease. Anyone know if that's true?

When we adopted our poodle a year ago (at age 3) his gums were pretty bad, and we had the procedure done. His teeth were definitely cleaner, gums were healthier, and breath better. But it doesn't stay like that forever. We tried "dental chews" but they didn't seem to help much, although one made him choke once and that was the end of the dental chews. We tried brushing, but didn't stick with it. So, here we are a year later, having the procedure done again. :(

My advice: get your dog's teeth cleaned now, and then brush regularly, and hopefully he won't need another procedure for awhile. That's what we're going to try this time around, anyway.

-- waiting for the call to pick up my dog from the vet!
 

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If it were my poodle... I would not have him under anesthesia. poodles are incredibly sensitive. Studies are now showing the long-term effects of humans who have undergone surgery and been exposed to anesthesia suffer from numerous brain and nurological issue which don't show up for years later. I would suspicion the food Bauer is eating is the culprit. His bad breath comes from what he is digesting.. perhaps he has yeast infection. I'd try putting some all-natural yougurt in his dog food for a few days and see if that doesn't make a difference in this breathe.
 

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by the way our poodle was 15 years old and Never had her teeth cleaned under anesthesia. My poodles now are 5 and their teeth are also pearly white and tarter free.
 

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Turned, you may be right about the anesthesia -- I hadn't heard that before, but I will look into it.

However, dogs (like humans) CAN get plaque and CAN get gum disease -- which does cause bad breath -- and once this gets going, it's hard to stop without a cleaning. And the consequences can be loose teeth or lost teeth. So, again, the key thing is to do whatever it takes to avoid the cleaning. (As I said above, we've been bad about this but we're going to be better going forward). But if a dog really does have plaque and puffy gums (something that anyone can see by inspection), I think that having the cleaning done is the best choice.
 

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Followup: We picked Marley up from the vet and all is well. Teeth are white now -- no more brownish patches. He was manic at first, but he's calmed down now and is crashed out on my floor (something he does when he's really tired -- normally he'd hang out on my ottoman) as I type.

I asked the vet about poodles and teeth, and she said that small dogs in general (not just poodles -- she seemed to forget that not all poodles are small!) tend to have gum and teeth issues. My poodle is a miniature.

I imagine, too, that this differs from poodle to poodle even within a size class, just as some humans can get away with not flossing, while others struggle even though they floss diligently.
 

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Moose loves nilabones and chews them until I take them away and his gums bleed sometimes before I catch them. I think they really keep them clean they are always super white and his breath never has a bad odor at all. Maybe give them a shot?
 

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Moose loves nilabones and chews them until I take them away and his gums bleed sometimes before I catch them. I think they really keep them clean they are always super white and his breath never has a bad odor at all. Maybe give them a shot?
The plastic ones or the digestible ones? Marley chows the digestable ones in no time flat, but mostly ignores the plastic ones (he gives it a few chews occasionally). In general, he's not interested in chewing on things that are not food. (Count my blessings, I know!).
 

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The plastic ones or the digestible ones? Marley chows the digestable ones in no time flat, but mostly ignores the plastic ones (he gives it a few chews occasionally). In general, he's not interested in chewing on things that are not food. (Count my blessings, I know!).
Non-Digestable ones. He does not chew on them often but when he does he chews on them like he's going to eat the entire thing. Probably 3 or so times a week he goes to town on them. YOu can get flavored ones, they seem to be made a little less resistant to chewing but it may work if he doesn't like to chew much.
 

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Non-Digestable ones. He does not chew on them often but when he does he chews on them like he's going to eat the entire thing. Probably 3 or so times a week he goes to town on them. YOu can get flavored ones, they seem to be made a little less resistant to chewing but it may work if he doesn't like to chew much.
I think the last one of those we bought got buried somewhere. :) (If Marley can't finish a bone in a sitting, he will often try to bury it). I suppose we could try again...

Anyway, I know you're giving good advice for other, less persnickity dogs!! Get
'em chewing.
 

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Has all of his puppy teeth come out? I had a Miniature Schnauzer I rescued and his teeth were nasty and his breath smelled like something had died so I was checking his mouth after a bath and he had a puppy molar that did not come out all the way so after I pulled it out (it came out fairly easy) it was no time before his breath cleared up and he was able to chew his food properly so the tarter went down.

I have a 10 year old Am.Cocker mix who has her teeth brushed once a month and she has some of the cleanest teeth I have ever sean on a non show dog. I believe its because of the shins bone I give them. All of my dogs love them and will chew like crazy on them. You can find some that are "stuffed" but you can put just about anything that will stay inside of it and let them gnaw away!

Tuesday my Standard show girl just turned one and she as a tiny bit of tarter forming by the gum line and I have been brushing her teeth three times a week and plan on buying a scaler. Tues did not like her teeth brushed at first but I find if you let them kind of chew on the bristles with their back teeth they kind of brush them selves. I try to brush all mine when I give them a bath, if you take him to a groomer as the grooming to brush them for you. I have a client who ask me to brush her Poodle? Shih Tzu mixes teeth everything, she even brings his own brush and paste!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So we bought some Nutro tartar control cookies, we're hoping that will help clear up some of the tartar but if it's still bad by the time we go for the next check-up we'll just suck it up and get his teeth cleaned.
 

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Tarter

There is a product called Triple-pet Plaque Off, you put some in the dogs water everyday and the plaque just flakes off, It's wonderful! google it!
 

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There is a product called Triple-pet Plaque Off, you put some in the dogs water everyday and the plaque just flakes off, It's wonderful! google it!
This seems almost too good to be true -- has it really worked for you? I'm wondering why it's not available for people, if so!
 
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