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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recommendations? What have you tried? Anything you loved? Anything that didn't click for your team? Bad Dog, Fenzi, Susan Garrett...what else? Did you audit or pay the whole thing and get video analysis? Was it helpful?
 

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Leo (GSD), Lily (APBT), and Simon (SPoo)
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I've not taken any agility classes, but I have taken a TON of other classes with FDSA. While I frequently suggest doing the Bronze auditing level, for agility, if you are an absolute beginner who's never done it before, then I do recommend springing for Gold level if you can, and getting the one-on-one feedback. Even if you can't do that, then most classes have a Facebook group, and a lot of those will have a Teaching Assistant available for helping Bronze level students with one-on-one feedback, similar to what the instructor is giving Gold students.
 
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Thanks to Embark's notification of new relatives of my dogs, Frosty has a "full sibling" who is doing agility and loves it...got me interested in trying it with him! Will research Fenzi's stuff. Thanks, TeamHellhound.
 

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I used to teach agility, now teach Scentwork. One of my clubs has quite a few very competitive agility teams who are invited to national meets so I’m exposed to a lot of training opportunities as we have seminars etc. The websites and training I’ve been exposed to are Susan Garrett, One Mind and Baddog.

I’ve taken Susan Garrett’s and it’s a great website, tons of exercises etc. but I could see where it might be overwhelming unless you had certain goals or problem areas you knew you wanted to work on.

A good friend of mine used One Mind for her puppy and I joined in on zoom to watch many of the classes. I was going to assist her in teaching this in our club until covid hit. I loved how the immediate goal was to train your dog to work away from you. If I was serious about agility with my puppy Theo, I probably would do this program. I’ve taken working spots in their seminars when they visited my city. They are in Finland and train for the European style agility which is a larger ring but it works perfectly in the various American venues too. They have people from all over the world taking their courses so I think it’s all in English. What I saw was in English.


I’ve seen a few Baddog videos and I like how they teach, but I don’t have much experience.

I’ve taken several Scentwork classes with Fenzi but no agility class so I don’t have experience. TeamHellhound is a moderator on Fenzi’s Facebook page and has taken a lot of courses. In the Gold level you get to take short video clips to post for feedback from the teacher. That is only of value if you have agility equipment at home or access to it at a training club or a friends home.

This brings up an important question…. Do you have access to agility equipment?

Personally if you have never taken agility I think it’s best to do so in a club that has a lot of members who compete in agility whether AKC, CPE, UKC, NADAC etc. Look for a club with several levels of classes where they teach the proper foundations. Any dog can jump over a pole, but an agility dog needs to do it properly using the hind legs to push off and nose down coming over the pole. The teeter, Aframe and dog walk need to be carefully taught. This is especially important for both dogs who are a little timid or bold. Timid dogs may fear the teeter and need slow thoughtful lessons while a bold dog needs to be taught to complete the obstacles to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Background: Scout is my first Agility dog and we just earned her Excellent Jumper Preferred title with AKC. She won her Excellent Agility title about 8 months ago, and has her Open FAST but we started doing FEO in FAST to generate more enthusiasm. She is slow, handler focused, but fairly reliable with contacts and weave entries. I would say that I am a mediocre handler, due (hopefully) to lack of experience.

There are no classes in the area currently that don't conflict with work, but we drive 50 miles once a week to work with a small group of people at a run thru. I also meet another person/dog once a week at a small building that has equipment but not much room. We usually do a couple jumping drills and set up a small box or pinwheel or a serp to practice. The other handler is much better than I am, and she has helped with several small handling errors that I didn't know about. At home I have weaves and 4 jumps, but the ground is either too wet or too frozen for the next several months to do much.

I have done a couple of Fenzi courses and might repeat them since I think I still have access. Maybe see what small space drills we can do. I took the Bad Dog Agility Invitational prep course as an auditor, but fizzled out on that when my schedule got busy. I've never done the video portion of a course. Wondering if that would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Personally if you have never taken agility I think it’s best to do so in a club that has a lot of members who compete in agility whether AKC, CPE, UKC, NADAC etc. Look for a club with several levels of classes where they teach the proper foundations. Any dog can jump over a pole, but an agility dog needs to do it properly using the hind legs to push off and nose down coming over the pole. The teeter, Aframe and dog walk need to be carefully taught. This is especially important for both dogs who are a little timid or bold. Timid dogs may fear the teeter and need slow thoughtful lessons while a bold dog needs to be taught to complete the obstacles to be safe.
Thanks, Skylar. I agree 100% with starting out in person with a class. We could never have done this on our own. There is so much to learn!
 

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I took a class with Amanda Shyne, Data Driven Agility. It was quite helpful and one of her dogs actually is a mini poo.
I took a tugging class through Bad Dog at the start of the pandemic- that was good too.

I would recommend both, although I agree that it is preferable to start with in person classes.

I love Baddog agility's podcast on Apple Podcasts. My go-to for my 50 minute drive to agility class every week!!


 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I took a class with Amanda Shyne, Data Driven Agility. It was quite helpful and one of her dogs actually is a mini poo.
I took a tugging class through Bad Dog at the start of the pandemic- that was good too.

I would recommend both, although I agree that it is preferable to start with in person classes.

I love Baddog agility's podcast on Apple Podcasts. My go-to for my 50 minute drive to agility class every week!!


Thanks, Caroline! I hadn't heard of Data Driven Agility and I will look into that. I listen to Bad Dog Agility podcasts on my commute--good stuff. In fact, I emailed them a question once that became the topic of a podcast--handling other people's dogs. My friend has an Aussie youngster that is the opposite of my Scout, and the woman had a knee injury a couple weeks before the trial. So I got all amped up about running a sports car instead of a family sedan, but unfortunately she recovered and could run the Aussie. Er...I mean, fortunately, of course. Because it would be wrong to hope her knee was just a tiny bit painful in a temporary manner so that I could try to run a fast dog. Naturally I would never hope for that. So wrong.
 

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Love the sports car- family sedan analogy! Gracie is plenty fast for me, lol. How wonderful they used your topic, I listened to that podcast. I ran a friend‘s dog in class last night, a Samoyed. Very different than running Gracie.
 
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