Poodle Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, we go to our new vet today to get shots and just general wellness stuff. However, I have to stay in the car while the vet takes them into the building to do this because of the whole COVID thing. They’ve always acted pretty nuts when we’ve taken them (being a kid for most of their lives, I never really got much say when it came to socializing the dogs), and I’m worried that this will just make them more likely to freak out in the future, especially Fluffy, since he’s so sensitive and attached to his mama. I already really like this vet—they asked for a fecal sample and everything, and the receptionist was one of the rare super nice ones—and would really prefer not switching again if I can avoid it. How can I make this a more pleasant experience? Also, are there any questions in particular I should ask the vet?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,875 Posts
Will they be resuming more normal service soon? If so, can the appointment be put off for a little while?

If not, I'd pack a sandwich bag of the world's tastiest treats and send the bag in with them. You could even explain your concerns over the phone beforehand.

Of course, if they're already absolutely terrified, they're not going to take treats, in which case I'd do what I could to push the appointment back a bit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,777 Posts
Zoom appointments? If not, I would call with my list of health concerns, questions beforehand and hope that the businesslike handing of Buck by the vet staff will be fine. It could be more efficient and certainly safer for us humans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
We took them around six hours ago, and it actually wound up being okay. I was overreacting from nerves, I guess. 😅 I took them on a long walk prior to the appointment, so they were pretty tuckered out beforehand. We warned them that they could get a little nuts before they went in the building. The vet called me on the phone while she did the appointment, and she was giving them lots of treats, it sounded like. I’m kind of impressed at how well they behaved for her, they barely barked.

I tried to go as long as I could without an appointment, but they needed heart worm meds + rabies shots (have’t been able to give them a dose since February! Eek!) and our previous vet was not cooperating with us on online orders/was clearly giving Fluffy the wrong dose, so... Someone got a new customer.

Fingers crossed that next time goes as smoothly, and I can meet the vet in person 😄.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,716 Posts
I am glad it ended as a pleasant experience (best that it can be at moment). My guy also is glued to me and the initial separation is very traumatic on him. Even with his groomer. That being said he is always fine when he is returned to me. The vet last time made me muzzle him but once they had him inside they realized it wasn't necessary and its just the initial separation. He actually did quite well probably better than if I stayed with him. Our groomer is not allowing anyone inside the building and comes out to get the dog, switches to her lead and we have to keep ours outside. I wasn't to crazy about this and may rethink my next appointment, just realized I ddidn't make one, oops. IF for any reason our re leashing didn't coincide properly he could have taken off. I'm pretty sure he would recall but the initial hey I'm free could be dangerous as its fairly close to a highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
So, we go to our new vet today to get shots and just general wellness stuff. However, I have to stay in the car while the vet takes them into the building to do this because of the whole COVID thing. They’ve always acted pretty nuts when we’ve taken them (being a kid for most of their lives, I never really got much say when it came to socializing the dogs), and I’m worried that this will just make them more likely to freak out in the future, especially Fluffy, since he’s so sensitive and attached to his mama. I already really like this vet—they asked for a fecal sample and everything, and the receptionist was one of the rare super nice ones—and would really prefer not switching again if I can avoid it. How can I make this a more pleasant experience? Also, are there any questions in particular I should ask the vet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Just took our 12 week old toy poodle to first vet visit and also had to wait in car while they took him in. I was told after his visit that he was dominating and aggressive. Mounting and biting, growling and crying/screaming. They said we will have issues with our upcoming grooming. I have been desensitizing him for weeks by touching his ears, nails etc. He doesn’t show aggression to me but does mount our feet sometimes and when very excited he will try to nip when playing close to our hands. He will also growl when I have to pick him up only to bring him down the stairs. But 90% of the time he is a playful, happy and confident puppy. With the Covid rules it is hard to get him comfortable with the vet and I worry the grooming will be a disaster. But more importantly I am worried he is going to become more aggressive and dominant as he gets older and in more day to day tasks. The vet tech sounded very concerned. I can’t find local Behavior training and am wondering what I can do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Just took our 12 week old toy poodle to first vet visit and also had to wait in car while they took him in. I was told after his visit that he was dominating and aggressive. Mounting and biting, growling and crying/screaming. They said we will have issues with our upcoming grooming. I have been desensitizing him for weeks by touching his ears, nails etc. He doesn’t show aggression to me but does mount our feet sometimes and when very excited he will try to nip when playing close to our hands. He will also growl when I have to pick him up only to bring him down the stairs. But 90% of the time he is a playful, happy and confident puppy. With the Covid rules it is hard to get him comfortable with the vet and I worry the grooming will be a disaster. But more importantly I am worried he is going to become more aggressive and dominant as he gets older and in more day to day tasks. The vet tech sounded very concerned. I can’t find local Behavior training and am wondering what I can do.
12 weeks... That’s not very old to judge a puppy on. Some dogs aren’t even potty trained at that age! The dog is still essentially a toddler, so of course he’s going to misbehave in a scary new situation. Shame on your vet for not trying to make things more positive, if they didn’t try to. Also, there’s no such thing as domination in dogs, only instinct related behavior (such as reacting to stress with mouthing, crying, etc., anything to make the stimulus go away). I’d be suspicious of the vet’s qualifications if they don’t know that already, seeing as we’ve known this for years now.

The growling thing does concern me, though, and if you don’t nip that in the bud, it’s going to become a habit. Some dogs just don’t like being held. My JRT always gives me some snark when I pick her up for bath time.

When is your grooming appointment? Maybe you can invite a low-risk family member over to help desensitize him to strangers touching him beforehand. Also, have you tried searching online? I know some trainers are willing to skype.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,716 Posts
12 weeks old..he is a baby and more than likely has some fear issues and the possibility of small dog syndrome, in that he is the alpha. I am more inclined to think he is just fearful. I would work on him right away with this and have him work for he wants. Use his meals for training. Ian Dunbar, Susan Garrett have some good info on po site training technics. I recently saw a video that dunbar posted for free, and he has been having major sales on his dvd's.
Dunbar's Top Dog Academy! I'm old school when it comes to training but I rather like him. Your vet is correct in one way, you do need to nip his behavior asap. He is not in charge. I would let the groomer know its his first time and I would try and associate him with others, rather than just yourself. My guy is glued to me he is a standard but I'd rather him not to be. Though once he is separated from me he is a different guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
12 weeks... That’s not very old to judge a puppy on. Some dogs aren’t even potty trained at that age! The dog is still essentially a toddler, so of course he’s going to misbehave in a scary new situation. Shame on your vet for not trying to make things more positive, if they didn’t try to. Also, there’s no such thing as domination in dogs, only instinct related behavior (such as reacting to stress with mouthing, crying, etc., anything to make the stimulus go away). I’d be suspicious of the vet’s qualifications if they don’t know that already, seeing as we’ve known this for years now.

The growling thing does concern me, though, and if you don’t nip that in the bud, it’s going to become a habit. Some dogs just don’t like being held. My JRT always gives me some snark when I pick her up for bath time.

When is your grooming appointment? Maybe you can invite a low-risk family member over to help desensitize him to strangers touching him beforehand. Also, have you tried searching online? I know some trainers are willing to skype.
Thanks for your response! I just got the vet report card from the visit to send to insurance (required) and they have written out in detail about how aggressive he was and that they recommended I find a behavior trainer. I hope my insurance wont be declined now. I am very concerned now.

We have had family over a couple times with there 3 very different dogs and we have an 11 year old grumpy grandma dog (Wiem/vizsla cross) . She has been disciplining him when he gets to in her face and he is learning. He doesn’t show fear At all with the other kids/family and dogs and will be held but does try to mouth if no toy in hand. He gets excited and has tried to mount one of their dogs and got a growl to back off. He growls when playing tug of war and during his own play time with stuffy. It seems like when I try to pick him up at the top of the stairs he may not want to always come down and also feels like he wants to be the decision maker! I will have to find out ways to calm him before I pick him up to come down while staying assertive. But any other time picking him up is fine.
I think I can go into the groomers next week and walk around a bit to get him more comfortable before they take him. He hates car rides so I also don’t want the rides to only relate to vet and groomer fear!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I just got the vet report card from the visit to send to insurance (required) and they have written out in detail about how aggressive he was and that they recommended I find a behavior trainer. I hope my insurance wont be declined now.
Is this just pet insurance? It might be more financially savvy to just pay out of pocket. A lot of the companies gouge prices to the point where it would cost less to save the amount you would pay in a separate bank account. They start you out with a small quote, but then it grows bigger over time.

I would find a different vet if I were you, just to get a second opinion. My gut tells me something's off with this one. Do they have any deals with local trainers or something to that effect, where they would profit off of a dog "behaving aggressive"? Especially if your dog behaves nicely around other people. After all... This is a PUPPY we're talking about, who is still learning, not an adult dog, whose behavior would be unacceptable if it were like this. That's not to say that you shouldn't still keep an eye on him, but it sounds like you're doing a pretty good job at that.

I have had a couple of vets (we had quite a few different ones when I was growing up, due to the type of clinic we went to) where the dogs just did not like them at all. They were really rough, treated the dogs like objects, and I probably would have snarked at them, too, if I was treated like that! They clearly didn't know how to handle dogs. Our last vet was like that, which is one of the reasons why we made the switch to a different (and hopefully last) hospital. I've also had this one amazing vet where he just touched Misty, and she calmed down instantly. It was like a miracle! It isn't always the dog's fault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Thanks for the advice. I wish I could have been there to see his behaviour but will wait and see how grooming goes. I think you are right about the insurance. I had it with our 11 year old dog and just cancelled it as it kept going up in price. When I add up all the months premiums I could have saved it up and had much more in the bank!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Is this just pet insurance? It might be more financially savvy to just pay out of pocket. A lot of the companies gouge prices to the point where it would cost less to save the amount you would pay in a separate bank account. They start you out with a small quote, but then it grows bigger over time.

I would find a different vet if I were you, just to get a second opinion. My gut tells me something's off with this one. Do they have any deals with local trainers or something to that effect, where they would profit off of a dog "behaving aggressive"? Especially if your dog behaves nicely around other people. After all... This is a PUPPY we're talking about, who is still learning, not an adult dog, whose behavior would be unacceptable if it were like this. That's not to say that you shouldn't still keep an eye on him, but it sounds like you're doing a pretty good job at that.

I have had a couple of vets (we had quite a few different ones when I was growing up, due to the type of clinic we went to) where the dogs just did not like them at all. They were really rough, treated the dogs like objects, and I probably would have snarked at them, too, if I was treated like that! They clearly didn't know how to handle dogs. Our last vet was like that, which is one of the reasons why we made the switch to a different (and hopefully last) hospital. I've also had this one amazing vet where he just touched Misty, and she calmed down instantly. It was like a miracle! It isn't always the dog's fault.
I just wanted to follow up after Simba’s first grooming and he did great! The groomer said no aggressive behaviour and she was able to do full top to bottom groom! So relieved that it went well. But now have second thoughts about the vet and may look at going elsewhere. Simba has been getting better every day and while he is a rambunctious little guy he is smart and trainable. It might take a little more work but so worth it when I see progress! Whew!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,875 Posts
I just wanted to follow up after Simba’s first grooming and he did great! The groomer said no aggressive behaviour and she was able to do full top to bottom groom! So relieved that it went well. But now have second thoughts about the vet and may look at going elsewhere. Simba has been getting better every day and while he is a rambunctious little guy he is smart and trainable. It might take a little more work but so worth it when I see progress! Whew!
That is really encouraging news! And your attitude is perfect. Stay positive.

Peggy growled at the vet when we took her for a wellness check, a couple of days after bringing her home. She was 9 weeks old.

She was nervous, but fine with everyone else, even when the assistant held her so the tech could take her temperature, vaccinate her, etc. But something about the vet just made her say "NO."

The vet had us immediately call a trainer who totally freaked us out, telling us she couldn't in good conscience work with our puppy, that we needed an aggression specialist, and on it went.

Luckily, we were able to consult online with a highly regarded behaviourist, and then have Peggy assessed in-person by a trainer who works closely with local shelters and rescue groups.

Peggy behaved fine.

We returned to the vet clinic for a "fun visit", but chose to see a different vet. Following our trainer's guidance, he tossed treats for Peggy as he entered the room, and did a gentle exam on the floor as she was happily sniffing around. And then up onto the table she went for some more poking and prodding.

She wasn't remotely scared.

We later took her back to the original vet with no issue.

All this to say: It's good that you're concerned, because now's the time to build up your puppy's confidence and that concern will motivate you. But your positive mindset is everything.

Try another clinic for his next round of shots (maybe your groomer can recommend someone?), and go armed with the yummiest treats you've got. Vet day is the only time Peggy gets a highly coveted piece of crumbled up bacon.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top