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Can anyone please recommend red/apricot toy poodle breeders in the East Coast who covers necessary health checks. PLEASE HELP!

I found a few only who asks for $3000 and up, some for $6000 and up. I don't want a show quality pet. All I want is a happy healthy red/apricot toy poodle.

It's been over a month I've been looking for a suitable perfect breeder with no luck. And there are many puppy scammers around all the time.

I'd really appreciate if anyone could let me know breeders who have red/apricot toy puppies right now or expecting litters anytime soon.

BTW, just found out this Poodle Forum last night. I'm glad I finally landed here. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks so much! :)
 

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$3000 to $6000 is honestly usually not a great breeder, if that reassures you. Spoons from great breeders are typically $1500-2500,and often way more than that from "for profit" breeders. Unfortunately a lot of great breeders have waitlists.

IHave you tried this great list from Rose n Poos?
 

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Toys here on the east coast from a good breeders are $2500, thrre are wait list probably won't see puppy until the fall the soonest.
 

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Hi and Welcome!
I don't want a show quality pet. All I want is a happy healthy red/apricot toy poodle.
Along with the information in Breeder List and the additional resources, here's an excellent essay on why you might think differently about that statement after you read thru. Breeders who show also happen to be the most likely to do the proper health testing and breed to make sure your pet is as healthy and well bred as any show dog.

"I Don鈥檛 Want A Show dog; I Just Want A Pet"
by Joanna Kimball on July 13, 2010


This is one of the most pervasive sentiments that puppy buyers, especially families, express when they're looking for a dog. What they really mean, of course, is that they don't want a show BREEDER 鈥 don't want to pay the high price they think show breeders charge, don't want to go through the often-invasive interview process, and think that they're getting a better deal or a real bargain because they can get a Lab for $300 or a Shepherd for $150.

I want you to change your mind. I want you to not only realize the benefits of buying a show-bred dog, I want you to INSIST on a show-bred dog. And I want you to realize that the cheap dog is really the one that's the rip-off. And then I want you to go be obnoxious and, when your workmate says she's getting a puppy because her neighbor, who raises them, will give her one for free, or when your brother-in-law announces that they're buying a goldendoodle for the kids, I want you to launch yourself into their solar plexus and steal their wallets and their car keys.

Here's why:

If I ask you why you want a Maltese, or a Lab, or a Leonberger, or a Cardigan, I would bet you're not going to talk about how much you like their color. You're going to tell me things about personality, ability (to perform a specific task), relationships with other animals or humans, size, coat, temperament, and so on. You'll describe playing ball, or how affectionate you've heard that they are, or how well they get along with kids.

The things you will be looking for aren't the things that describe just "dog"; they'll be the things that make this particular breed unique and unlike other breeds.

That's where people have made the right initial decision 鈥 they've taken the time and made the effort to understand that there are differences between breeds and that they should get one that at least comes close to matching their picture of what they want a dog to be.

Their next step, tragically, is that they go out and find a dog of that breed for as little money and with as much ease as possible.

You need to realize that when you do this, you're going to the used car dealership, WATCHING them pry the "Audi" plate off a new car, observing them as they use Bondo to stick it on a '98 Corolla, and then writing them a check and feeling smug that you got an Audi for so little.

It is no bargain.

Those things that distinguish the breed you want from the generic world of "dog" are only there because somebody worked really hard to get them there. And as soon as that work ceases, the dog, no matter how purebred, begins to revert to the generic. That doesn't mean you won't get a good dog 鈥 the magic and the blessing of dogs is that they are so hard to mess up, in their good souls and minds, that even the most hideously bred one can still be a great dog 鈥 but it will not be a good Shepherd, or good Puli, or a good Cardigan. You will not get the specialized abilities, tendencies, or talents of the breed.

If you don't NEED those special abilities or the predictability of a particular breed, you should not be buying a dog at all. You should go rescue one. That way you're saving a life and not putting money in pockets where it does not belong.

If you want a purebred and you know that a rescue is not going to fit the bill, the absolute WORST thing you can do is assume that a name equals anything. They really are nothing more than name plates on cars. What matters is whether the engineering and design and service department back up the name plate, so you have some expectation that you're walking away with more than a label.

Keeping a group of dogs looking and acting like their breed is hard, HARD work. If you do not get the impression that the breeder you're considering is working that hard, is that dedicated to the breed, is struggling to produce dogs that are more than a breed name, you are getting no bargain; you are only getting ripped off."


Ask yourself who's more likely to invest the time and money into breeding the healthiest, best tempered, best looking poodles? This doesn't mean a breeder who doesn't compete with their dogs can't produce wonderful dogs too. In a way, the breeders investment in proper breed testing, competing, socializing puppies, all these and more are like insurance for the new family. They're not absolute guarantees, but they can sure be a benefit.
 

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20200607_164549.jpg

Care to guess which is from show dog lines and the one that is not.
Guess which one is super healthy and which has medical issues.
And yes both belong to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
$3000 to $6000 is honestly usually not a great breeder, if that reassures you. Spoons from great breeders are typically $1500-2500,and often way more than that from "for profit" breeders. Unfortunately a lot of great breeders have waitlists.

IHave you tried this great list from Rose n Poos?
No, I haven't! I ll check that out! Thank you!
 

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I will suggest you check of Rodell's toy poodles that's where I got my white boy from they have gorgeous toy poodles
 

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$3000 to $6000 is honestly usually not a great breeder, if that reassures you. Spoons from great breeders are typically $1500-2500,and often way more than that from "for profit" breeders. Unfortunately a lot of great breeders have waitlists.

IHave you tried this great list from Rose n Poos?
Hi and Welcome!


Along with the information in Breeder List and the additional resources, here's an excellent essay on why you might think differently about that statement after you read thru. Breeders who show also happen to be the most likely to do the proper health testing and breed to make sure your pet is as healthy and well bred as any show dog.

"I don鈥檛 want a show dog; I just want a pet.
by Joanna Kimball on July 13, 2010

This is one of the most pervasive sentiments that puppy buyers, especially families, express when they're looking for a dog. What they really mean, of course, is that they don't want a show BREEDER 鈥 don't want to pay the high price they think show breeders charge, don't want to go through the often-invasive interview process, and think that they're getting a better deal or a real bargain because they can get a Lab for $300 or a Shepherd for $150.

I want you to change your mind. I want you to not only realize the benefits of buying a show-bred dog, I want you to INSIST on a show-bred dog. And I want you to realize that the cheap dog is really the one that's the rip-off. And then I want you to go be obnoxious and, when your workmate says she's getting a puppy because her neighbor, who raises them, will give her one for free, or when your brother-in-law announces that they're buying a goldendoodle for the kids, I want you to launch yourself into their solar plexus and steal their wallets and their car keys.

Here's why:

If I ask you why you want a Maltese, or a Lab, or a Leonberger, or a Cardigan, I would bet you're not going to talk about how much you like their color. You're going to tell me things about personality, ability (to perform a specific task), relationships with other animals or humans, size, coat, temperament, and so on. You'll describe playing ball, or how affectionate you've heard that they are, or how well they get along with kids.

The things you will be looking for aren't the things that describe just "dog"; they'll be the things that make this particular breed unique and unlike other breeds.

That's where people have made the right initial decision 鈥 they've taken the time and made the effort to understand that there are differences between breeds and that they should get one that at least comes close to matching their picture of what they want a dog to be.

Their next step, tragically, is that they go out and find a dog of that breed for as little money and with as much ease as possible.

You need to realize that when you do this, you're going to the used car dealership, WATCHING them pry the "Audi" plate off a new car, observing them as they use Bondo to stick it on a '98 Corolla, and then writing them a check and feeling smug that you got an Audi for so little.

It is no bargain.

Those things that distinguish the breed you want from the generic world of "dog" are only there because somebody worked really hard to get them there. And as soon as that work ceases, the dog, no matter how purebred, begins to revert to the generic. That doesn't mean you won't get a good dog 鈥 the magic and the blessing of dogs is that they are so hard to mess up, in their good souls and minds, that even the most hideously bred one can still be a great dog 鈥 but it will not be a good Shepherd, or good Puli, or a good Cardigan. You will not get the specialized abilities, tendencies, or talents of the breed.

If you don't NEED those special abilities or the predictability of a particular breed, you should not be buying a dog at all. You should go rescue one. That way you're saving a life and not putting money in pockets where it does not belong.

If you want a purebred and you know that a rescue is not going to fit the bill, the absolute WORST thing you can do is assume that a name equals anything. They really are nothing more than name plates on cars. What matters is whether the engineering and design and service department back up the name plate, so you have some expectation that you're walking away with more than a label.

Keeping a group of dogs looking and acting like their breed is hard, HARD work. If you do not get the impression that the breeder you're considering is working that hard, is that dedicated to the breed, is struggling to produce dogs that are more than a breed name, you are getting no bargain; you are only getting ripped off."


Ask yourself who's more likely to invest the time and money into breeding the healthiest, best tempered, best looking poodles? This doesn't mean a breeder who doesn't compete with their dogs can't produce wonderful dogs too. In a way, the breeders investment in proper breed testing, competing, socializing puppies, all these and more are like insurance for the new family. They're not absolute guarantees, but they can sure be a benefit.

You got me totally wrong! I clearly mentioned I want a puppy from a breeder who covers all necessary health checks. Also mentioned, I want a happy and healthy puppy. By this I meant I just don't want a random puppy who is not from a breeder without any health check.
The sentence which you quote and replied the response on was - I don't want a show quality - yes I still don't. I've talked to quite a few breeders who charge a lot higher for show quality and less for the ones who will be pets but has been through all the necessary health checks and tests, genetically clear and healthy. These breeders won't sust sell a unhealthy puppy to anyone as they really care about their pups. Thanks!
 

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Hi, sorry for any misunderstandings. Your experiences seem to be different from what I've learned.

I agree with FWoP and Twyla that prices of $3000-$6000 are simply well above typical for a pup of any quality being sold as a pet. I don't think I've seen higher than $2500 ever, for those that list pricing on their sites. I'm not asking but without knowing some of the breeders you've contacted and seeing their websites, it's not possible to gauge what kind of breeder you've run across.

It's not unusual that a breeder would charge more for a show quality pup if they're selling with full registration and therefore breeding rights and the ability to register any offspring if both sire and dam are registered, rather than limited registration. To show, a pup must remain intact which means breeding can happen with or without the breeder being involved, in spite of contracts. They're generally very protective of breeding rights because their kennel reputation is on the line.

But, most generally since there aren't that many show quality pups born, the breeders tend to keep them for themselves or co-own with another breeder or handler known to them. It's my understanding that selling a show quality pup to someone without a proven history in showing is definitely not the norm. I'm surprised that you've run across quite a few breeders who had show quality pups available.

Show quality pups are sometimes held back for their potential but if they go oversize or something develops that would reduce their chances in competing then they're no longer show quality. That pup would be sold but as a pet and with limited registration and generally at the same price as their other pups.

If any of the breeders asking those higher than typical prices were on the Breeder List, would you please let me know? I'm compiling it based on provable health testing and looked thru every site pretty carefully but I'd want to be able to give a heads up to anyone else using the list.
 

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Just popping in to say I'm so glad you're doing your homework. :) It's so tempting to jump at the puppy that's available NOW instead of taking the time to find the breeder that's right for us.

Keep us posted on your search! Your efforts are going to pay off. I'm sure of it.
 

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Hi, sorry for any misunderstandings. Your experiences seem to be different from what I've learned.

I agree with FWoP and Twyla that prices of $3000-$6000 are simply well above typical for a pup of any quality being sold as a pet. I don't think I've seen higher than $2500 ever, for those that list pricing on their sites. I'm not asking but without knowing some of the breeders you've contacted and seeing their websites, it's not possible to gauge what kind of breeder you've run across.

It's not unusual that a breeder would charge more for a show quality pup if they're selling with full registration and therefore breeding rights and the ability to register any offspring if both sire and dam are registered, rather than limited registration. To show, a pup must remain intact which means breeding can happen with or without the breeder being involved, in spite of contracts. They're generally very protective of breeding rights because their kennel reputation is on the line.

But, most generally since there aren't that many show quality pups born, the breeders tend to keep them for themselves or co-own with another breeder or handler known to them. It's my understanding that selling a show quality pup to someone without a proven history in showing is definitely not the norm. I'm surprised that you've run across quite a few breeders who had show quality pups available.

Show quality pups are sometimes held back for their potential but if they go oversize or something develops that would reduce their chances in competing then they're no longer show quality. That pup would be sold but as a pet and with limited registration and generally at the same price as their other pups.

If any of the breeders asking those higher than typical prices were on the Breeder List, would you please let me know? I'm compiling it based on provable health testing and looked thru every site pretty carefully but I'd want to be able to give a heads up to anyone else using the list.
Rose n Poos, my response to your question ended up being my search history summary which I'd like to keep for myself. So I addressed your question with extra info. This will be helpful for me mostly I guess. Thank you!

Yes, by quite a few, I really meant quite a few. And they asked me do I want show quality as I kept on asking about all the necessary health checks. Then I was told these checks are done in all of their puppies, but show quality puppies' price would be much higher considering many other factors. It's been close to 45 days I've been searching constantly to find the perfect puppy. I've lost count of how many people I called. If I could, I'd have loved to give you the names of the people. I started calling people state by state. And I know there's nothing for me there so it's not possible for me to remember the names. Also, not a single breeder on AKC Marketplace responded to my query, even the ones where I did not mention red/apricot and it was mentioned on their profile that puppies are available or will be available soon. On AKC Marketplace, I contacted breeders state by state in all states of New England, New York, Maryland, Pennsylvania. Trust me, I did not receive even one single reply. Also, most of the breeders never bother to respond as they must be getting this calls all day long given the high demand. And the reputable breeders never receive calls. I called so many breeders already a few times but no response! Those who receive either informs me that they have around 40/50 on waitlist or they are accepting applications for Spring 2021 or whole year 2021. I'm on most probably all the Poodle related Facebook Pages looking for good breeders when people post healthy looking poodles. Surprisingly, other than the scammers, there are many helpful people out there who are willing to help as much as they can. Glad to realize that.
I earnestly requested in my emails and voicemails that I am seriously looking for one, I'd really appreciate if they please give me a call back. But to no avail! And surprisingly it happened the most when I contacted the reputable breeders. They don't even respond to Facebook messages. Fun fact, I was looking for a yorkie before i decided on a poodle. Reputable breeders of Yorkies at least responded, but poodle breeders - None! I know they are busy but when someone contacts everywhere and there is no response, then I have no idea how to reach them. Also, they have no idea it's the same person knocking them everywhere as I am not mentioning my name again and again in all of the platforms. I think the high demand during the pandemic made the reputable breeders stop receiving calls/emails as they have huge wait list already. Anyway, this have been my search for my dream dog history.
About the expensive ones, I found three in the New York and New England region. I think they were Crawmers, Rodell on the higher end and most probably Tiny Companion could be the $6500 one. Again, I just called and checked off the list and noted high price. I know I was told $6000-$6500 so seeing my "high price" note I'm guessing these could be the three. BUT, If anyone is reading this, please make sure you call and ask the price yourself. I've called so many, so I cannot guarantee 100% accuracy at this point as it's been a while I am searching.

BTW, I know it's my criteria for the poodle made it so difficult to find one - red/apricot female toy/mini. And they ask for higher for these colors. I have had other colors of dogs before. This is my dream dog I've been waiting for, so this time I am determined to do all it takes to get a happy healthy dream dog.
I have contacted a couple poodle clubs who gave me very important information on what to look for in a breeders. My next plan is to contact the referral people state by state on these poodle club.

P.S. Everything I mentioned above are the summery of the search for a perfect healthy toy/mini poodle for over a month. I tried my level best to mention everything (i.e. 40/50 waitlist, the price range) as exact as possible. I am going to create a post copy pasting this just in case it helps anyone out there looking for a poodle.
 

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Summery of my search for a poodle is actually for myself as it ll act as a puppy search history for me. I hope it gives insights to people looking for puppies. However, everyone should do their own research and should not rely on what I mentioned here.

I started looking for toy/mini breeders on AKC. However, not a single breeder on AKC Marketplace responded to my query, even the ones where I did not mention red/apricot and it was mentioned on their profile that puppies are available or will be available soon. On AKC Marketplace, I contacted breeders state by state in all states of New England, New York, Maryland, Pennsylvania. Trust me, I did not receive even one single reply. Also, most of the breeders never bother to respond as they must be getting this calls all day long given the high demand. And the reputable breeders never receive calls. I called so many breeders already for a few times but no response! Those who receive either informs me that they have around 40/50 on wait list or they are accepting applications for Spring 2021 or whole year 2021. I'm on most probably all the Poodle related Facebook Pages looking for good breeders when people post healthy looking poodles. Surprisingly, other than the scammers, there are many helpful people out there who are willing to help as much as they can. Glad to realize that.
When I contacted the breeders, I earnestly requested in my emails and voicemails that I am seriously looking for one, I'd really appreciate if they please give me a call back. But to no avail! They don't even respond to Facebook messages. Fun fact, I was looking for a yorkie before I decided on a poodle. Reputable breeders of Yorkies at least responded, but poodle breeders - None! I know they are busy but when someone contacts everywhere and there is no response, then I have no idea how to reach them. Also, they have no idea it's the same person knocking them everywhere as I am not mentioning my name again and again in all of the platforms. I think the high demand during the pandemic made the reputable breeders stop receiving calls/emails as they have huge wait list already. I don't blame them but I need to know a way how to get hold of them. Anyway, this have been my search history for my dream dog.
About the price, most reputable breeders' puppies are expensive given the health quality and other factors. I found 3 breeders whose range was between $6000-$6500 which I can't afford. Others start from $2500. Given my color preference, it becomes more expensive, a lot higher than $2500.
BTW, I know it's my criteria for the poodle that made it so difficult to find one - red/apricot female toy/mini. And they ask for higher for these colors. I have had other colors of dogs before. This is my dream dog I've been waiting for, so this time I am determined to do all it takes to get a happy healthy dream dog.
I have contacted a couple poodle clubs who gave me very useful information on what to look for in breeders. My next plan is to contact the referral people state by state on these poodle clubs.

BTW, this poodle search has been specifically difficult given the criteria of my dream dog (Read Title).

P.S. Everything I mentioned above are the summery of the search for a perfect healthy toy/mini poodle for over a month. I tried my level best to mention everything (i.e. 40/50 waitlist, the price range) as exact as possible.

PLEASE don't post any rude comments. I started searching for a puppy from scratch. I've been learning along the way. Any useful tips will be greatly appreciated.
ALSO, please don't ask me to get another breed if I can't afford a healthy poodle. Heard that already! No! I want a healthy poodle from a good breeder and I can't spend that much.
 

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I鈥檓 sorry it鈥檚 so hard to find your dog. The pandemic has created a frenzy for dogs and it has me very worried that so many of them are going to be abandoned when people who haven鈥檛 thought it out carefully realize having a dog is not just fairies and unicorns (I鈥檓 not saying it鈥檚 your case).

I鈥檓 from Canada but some of the prices you鈥檙e mentioning are just ridiculous (6000$). Around here, the only ones who sell dogs at that price are 芦 greeders 禄, people who only want to make money and don鈥檛 care about health or the breed. They will sell you more for certain colors too. On the other hand, good ethical breeders only have one price for their puppies sold as pets, no matter the color. A poodle from an ethical show breeder in Canada will cost around 1800$-2000$. I suspect it鈥檚 around the same in the States.

I don鈥檛 know if it鈥檚 something you would consider, but it鈥檚 always much easier to find an older puppy or young adult that a puppy.

Look around on the forum for ideas of ethical breeders who do health testing and try to better the breed.
 

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Thank you for this detailed information. I'll read it again more carefully later today but two things stand out to me,

The first is
And they asked me do I want show quality as I kept on asking about all the necessary health checks. Then I was told these checks are done in all of their puppies,
I really have to wonder about a breeder asking you if you want show quality just because you mention health testimg. Health testing is a given for quality breeders. That just seems more marketing ploy than conscientious breeder to me.

Health "checks" on puppies are helpful but this is not the proper health testing to be discussed. If the breeder starts immediately talking about "checks" on puppies when you ask about health testing, I'd be concerned. That testing is done on the breeding parents. A health "guarantee" on a puppy doesn't have much behind it to back it up without the parents having been tested and cleared for the known breed issues. Again, not knowing or asking which breeders, but puppy "health checks" without the genetic and other testing proven done on the parents is usually a sign of a not great breeder.

The second is
BTW, I know it's my criteria for the poodle made it so difficult to find one - red/apricot female toy/mini. And they ask for higher for these colors.
A conscientious, quality breeder does NOT charge different prices for colors. Doing that is another marketing ploy to increase their profit. A conscientious, quality breeder is not looking to make a profit when they breed.
__

Here's my personal chacklist for a breeder:

My ideal breeder is someone who is doing this because they love the breed. They want to see each new generation born at least as good as the previous, ideally better. They provide for every dog in their care as if that dog is their own. They will be there for the new family, and stand behind that pup for it's lifetime, rain or shine, with or without a contract. They will know the standards and pedigrees of their chosen breed, health and genetic diversity of their lines, and breed to better them. They will know of the latest studies in health standards for their chosen breed and variety.

They will have as many questions for me as I do for them. They invest in their dogs. They don't expect the dogs to support them.


Breeding Program
! to maintain, improve, strengthen the breed
by breeding to standard, for health and genetic diversity,
and will prove their dogs meet these standards by showing or competing
or by breeding from titled parents. It's not the title, but what it shows
! focus is on quality, never quantity
! they do not cross breed

Breeding Parents
! registry information available
AKC Registry Lookup
Dog Search
! not too old or young for breeding
! not overbred
see Asking questions from a breeder
and Frequency of Breeding a Bitch
! genetic health testing done appropriate to breed and variety
! other health testing such as eyes, hips
! results of testing on own website, OFA site or testing lab
see Health Related Publications - Versatility In Poodles, Inc.
and OFA Lookup https://www.ofa.org/look-up-a-dog

Living Conditions
! in home with family
! breeder allows, even encourages home visits

Puppies
! routine and urgent vet care, immunizations, dewormings
! socialization
! first groomings
! registry papers
! they will not require spay/neuter before physical maturity
! health "guarantee" generally favors the breeder, not the buyer.
health guarantee is no replacement for health testing of dam and sire.
beginning housetraining is a bonus
temperament testing is helpful

Advertising
! individual website to detail history of breeder, goals for their program
! information on dams, sires, puppies
! no trend pricing for color, gender or size,
! no marketing gimmick terms like "teacup" "royal"

! Anything not found on the website should be provided by breeder before buying

If a breeder wants me to believe that they believe in their dogs, they won't stop the investment when it comes time to find the new families. If they want to cut costs by using free advertising sites like craigslist or listing on retail marketplaces like puppyspot or puppyfind, or other classified ad sites such as newspapers, I wonder what else they've cut costs on.

Contact a few breeders to introduce yourself. Even if they don't have or don't offer what you're looking for, it can be a close knit community. They may know where to refer you.
_

and this thread to give additional and corroborating insight on finding a quality breeder:
Buying A Puppy Safely

----------------

Here's the resources to check on health testing of the breeding parents
AKC Registry Lookup - by kennel name or dog name or registry number

Health Testing Criteria - Parents Are Tested Not Puppies - Additional Testing

Toy Minimum Testing Criteria
prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) DNA testing from an approved laboratory
Eye clearance by the Companion Animal Eye Registry (CAER)
Patellar Luxation OFA evaluation

Here is where the results are registered by the breeder
OFA Lookup - by kennel name or dog name or registry number - Orthopedic Foundation for Animals

To find specifically what you're looking for, it seems you'll need to expand your search area.

If you haven't already looked thru the Breeder List I linked before, I'd go thru all the toy/mini breeders on these multi lists to see who's breeding the color you want and contact them regardless of location. This is not to necessarily get a pup from them but they may know of breeders nearer to you that have what you're looking for:

Multi State

Breeders here all do appropriate health testing.

Poodlesonline .com

PoodleBreeders .com

Poodle Variety Breeders
pending

Good Dog .com
pending

United Poodle Association
pending health ck and update - suggested by PF member

"I have contacted a couple poodle clubs who gave me very important information on what to look for in a breeders. My next plan is to contact the referral people state by state on these poodle club."

Very good idea. Note that a wait list is very typical if you want a puppy from a conscientious, quality breeder doing the right things to ensure the best puppies and the best for the breed. These breeders may only produce 1-2 litters a year and mini and toy litters are quite small. Anyone who pretty much always has puppies available, with a few good larger scale breeder exceptions, is not likely to be investing much in their dogs since that cuts into their profit.
 

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I can't thank you enough for all the information you've provided.

Answer to One,
Yes, they did ask me that when I asked about the tests you mentioned above about the Toy breed's 3 health test (I got to know about those 3 test from one of the poodle club people who gave me a list of things to look for in a toy breeder). And yes I know for sure no responsible breeder would ask me that when I ask about these tests.

Two,
I read it in so many places that no reputable/responsible breeder would ask for higher price for the red/apricot or unique colors. However, trust me, I have found none so far who charge the same for all colors

Regarding your breeder list,
yes I have bean through each and every one in New England, NY, PA, MD, VA. They either don't have toy/mini or they have but white and black mostly.

As you've suggested, I would have to expand my search! At times I think I should give up during this high demand phase. But that ll only postpone my getting a puppy as everyone seems to be filling out applications, so I might end up not getting a puppy even in 2021! Also, when I think all these days of research will go in vain, I can't accept I ll just give it up now.

I ll check out the links you've provided above. Thank you! I really appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I鈥檓 sorry it鈥檚 so hard to find your dog. The pandemic has created a frenzy for dogs and it has me very worried that so many of them are going to be abandoned when people who haven鈥檛 thought it out carefully realize having a dog is not just fairies and unicorns (I鈥檓 not saying it鈥檚 your case).

I鈥檓 from Canada but some of the prices you鈥檙e mentioning are just ridiculous (6000$). Around here, the only ones who sell dogs at that price are 芦 greeders 禄, people who only want to make money and don鈥檛 care about health or the breed. They will sell you more for certain colors too. On the other hand, good ethical breeders only have one price for their puppies sold as pets, no matter the color. A poodle from an ethical show breeder in Canada will cost around 1800$-2000$. I suspect it鈥檚 around the same in the States.

I don鈥檛 know if it鈥檚 something you would consider, but it鈥檚 always much easier to find an older puppy or young adult that a puppy.

Look around on the forum for ideas of ethical breeders who do health testing and try to better the breed.
Yes, I heard that from many people on social media about the good old price range. I wish the price range goes down soon. Otherwise, I can't even fill out applications because in that case I am applying knowing the high price!
BTW, do you mean CAD $1800-$2000?
 

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Expand into Canada to increase your choices, What I have there is listed after the US listings. I don't know what the importing status is right now but worth looking at, I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Expand into Canada to increase your choices, What I have there is listed after the US listings. I don't know what the importing status is right now but worth looking at, I think.
Thank you! Will do! Have to wait for this whole Covid-19 situation to get over.
 
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