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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It's only been a week but I don't know what to do. Never had a pup before. He's 4 months old.
Marco, my 11/12yo standard is submissive to the point of backing off any time pup wants anything. Pup can sleep in his bed, and M sleeps in the bathtub behind the shower curtain. He just wants to get away. If pup wants his food, M backs rights off (I have separate places for food and try to feed M first.)
Right now M is staying at the bottom of the stairs leading up to our apt.
Will this go on a long time? What can I do to bring them together? Thanks, you guys.
 

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I was just talking about this same situation in my class tonight with a student. She has a wild puppy and an older 12-year-old dog. The puppy overwhelms the older dog. I suggested she think of her home as a timeshare, where each dog gets special one-on-one time with the people, and each dog gets time alone. The older dog deserves a quiet retirement without a pre-schooler bouncing everywhere. The puppy can practice visiting the older dog just like a child visiting an elder relative, but the puppy is leashed and under control during these visits. Get a crate and put your puppy away when you feed your older dog.

The less freedom your puppy has now, the easier your life will be in the future. Crate the puppy when you can't be 100% focused on him. Put a leash around your waist and take the puppy with you around the house to get him used to moving with you. He needs direction and gentle leadership way more than the freedom to bop around your house being crazy.

He needs to practice being calm around his elders, which means management on your end. You wouldn't let a four-year-old human climb all over a frail 80-year-old, so don't let your puppy overwhelm your older dog. Take your puppy to a well run puppy class and talk to your teacher. In the meantime, crates and gates will make your life much better.
 

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Awww...your poor older poodle. Well, you're doing well to give them separation. You must protect M from being bothered or pressured. So be sure to make a "safe" place M can go any time he wants to get away. Give it time. It's all so new to both of them. And you. lol. Be sure to pay plenty of attention to M and try associating treats and affection in the presence of the new puppy. Maybe separate them with a baby gate so they can see each other, sniff when your older one is ready but there won't be too much intrusion from the little one. How old is the baby? Is there a dog bed in the bathtub? LOL. :bath:


LOL Click. I was still typing when you had already sent your post. Akkk. Sorry for the redundancy. You gave lots of good thorough advice.
 

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Marco is probably feeling that the pup is taking over his home and his family. Try to let him know that he is number one and the pup is number two. Pet him first before giving the pup any attention. He always gets food first and treats first and attention first. Spend time with Marco without the pup every day, he gets alone time with you. You might feel like you are ignoring the pup when you should be bonding with him, but you also need to spend alone time with the pup and without Marco every day.

If Marco wants to get away from the pup, give him someplace to go where he can escape. Don't try to force him, just let him know that he is not being replaced, and he doesn't need to be afraid that the pup is moving in and pushing him out.
 

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I was just talking about this same situation in my class tonight with a student. She has a wild puppy and an older 12-year-old dog. The puppy overwhelms the older dog. I suggested she think of her home as a timeshare, where each dog gets special one-on-one time with the people, and each dog gets time alone. The older dog deserves a quiet retirement without a pre-schooler bouncing everywhere. The puppy can practice visiting the older dog just like a child visiting an elder relative, but the puppy is leashed and under control during these visits. Get a crate and put your puppy away when you feed your older dog.

The less freedom your puppy has now, the easier your life will be in the future. Crate the puppy when you can't be 100% focused on him. Put a leash around your waist and take the puppy with you around the house to get him used to moving with you. He needs direction and gentle leadership way more than the freedom to bop around your house being crazy.

He needs to practice being calm around his elders, which means management on your end. You wouldn't let a four-year-old human climb all over a frail 80-year-old, so don't let your puppy overwhelm your older dog. Take your puppy to a well run puppy class and talk to your teacher. In the meantime, crates and gates will make your life much better.
What great advice!

Sent from my STV100-3 using Tapatalk
 

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Yes what click has already said. It is what I do whenever I bring a new dog into our home. The older ones get use to them behind gates or in crate. The puppy get used to it, learns, your home and your older dog is protected. I still have to separate my dogs at times. My poodle has lots of energy and loves to play, my boxer not so much. While they get along they don't eat together and when I see the boxer being harassed I remove the poodle from the scene.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you so much for being there, everyone!

Situation now: Marco is sleeping all night in the bathtub behind the shower curtain. He won't come out this morning. He did get out for a minute and then heard small bark from puppy and got right back in!

Is he being manipulative or is he sick (I took him his meds and a little cheese and he ate those right away).... he hasn't been out to pee this morning and this is when we usually go for a long walk .. . . don't know what to do!!!
 

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Thank you so much for being there, everyone!

Situation now: Marco is sleeping all night in the bathtub behind the shower curtain. He won't come out this morning. He did get out for a minute and then heard small bark from puppy and got right back in!

Is he being manipulative or is he sick (I took him his meds and a little cheese and he ate those right away).... he hasn't been out to pee this morning and this is when we usually go for a long walk .. . . don't know what to do!!!
He’s not being manipulative. Dogs don’t do that, they’re not like humans. He’s an elderly and he doesn’t like having the puppy around. It’s just too much for him so he is looking for peace.

I honestly don’t know what to say. Mixing a puppy with a senior dog is not easy. Marco’s life has been turned around, his peace and quiet is gone. Put yourself in his shoes.

Can someone babysit the puppy at their house for a while, and bring it back for short periods at a time, until Marco feels better about it ?
 

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Lily was seven (or just shy of it) when Javelin came into the picture. He was mostly pretty mellow around the older dogs, but Lily wanted nothing to do with him. I won't bother reiterating what has already been said, but will add it took well more than 6 months before she showed any kind of interest in him.
 

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It sounds like he's depressed. I think, given plenty of space and lots of things to do with just you, he'll come around eventually. Spend plenty of time lovin' on him and taking him special places for extra nice walks...whatever he likes. Associate the pup with the best treats or again...what he likes best.

I dumped two poodle puppies on my two senior Chihuahuas. I did the protective thing for them, kept the puppies from pouncing and making pests of themselves...used an ex pen. Of course, my Chihuahuas weren't submissive at all. They let the poodles know when they were bugging them and that's the best teacher...another dog. They'd let those little stinkers have it, growl, snarl. I did give them together time but supervised and separate time too. I didn't want the poodles to harass them, bother them a lot, but just a little, well within their tolerance range so they'd learn not to do the things they did. And soon, they settled down and they could all be together, once the poodles learned that the Chis wouldn't tolerate such insubordination. LOL. And eventually, they came to like the puppies and instigate play even. But in your case it sounds like your old fella is too submissive for that. So it may take more time. It would be nice if there could be spaces of time where the puppy is not around. But I am not sure if that might make the routine you're trying to develop more confusing.

No... being manipulative requires more sophisticated cognition than dogs have. So he's really feeling kind of lousy. He'll come around in time, no doubt.
 

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Interesting, How would you like it if you were elderly, quiet in your ways, and quite comfortable, and suddenly someone in your home, someone that you actually thought loved you, brought in two loud, obnoxious, misbehaved, awful kids and let them take over?
And then kept trying to drag you out to be with them?
 

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Mattsmom... I think if you have not you must separate the puppy from him. Give Marco his usual space and not the puppy. It sounds like he is over whelmed by the puppy. I'd keep the pup in a crate or in one room and not allow it to interact with Marco for the time being. Let Marco just get use to having another dog in the house. ZI'd also have the vet check him to rule out any medical issue. I sure hope this settles and that it works out. Sometimes our old boys just don't have the will to take on a puppy .
 

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I have decided after reading this that if I am going to get another dog, I will let my current beloved poodle choose it :) And then continue to treat him like the best buddy he has been.
 
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